Kimber History - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-21-2007, 09:20 PM
Kruzr's Avatar
Kruzr Kruzr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 13,220
Kimber History

For those who aren't familiar with Kimber's history and believe they've been making 1911's for over 25 years since they put out a 25 yr. anniversary model, here is the actual history.
The Ultimate 1911

(Full article on post #11 and another article on post #13)

The Government Model industry was shaken to its core by the introduction last year of Kimber's 1911. Priced at a mere $625...

...How Kimber, a name associated with high grade hunting rifles, came to be in the 1911 business requires a little history lesson.
The story begins in Yonkers, N.Y., with a company called Jerico Precision which was founded in 1978 as a manufacturer of hand tools and a subcontractor for various defense industries.
The name Jerico comes from founders Jerry Roman and the late Richard Brown, an acronym for "Jerry and Richard's Company."

...Jerico needed two things: a market and somebody who knew about 1911's.
The help they found turned out to be businessman Leslie Edelman, owner of a major firearms and accessory wholesale
company called Nationwide Sports, and Chip McCormick who knows something about 1911s. At the time, Edelman was a minority shareholder of Kimber Of America and his plan was to connect Jerico's manufacturing capability with Kimber's established dealer network.
The project began in the winter of 1994 and the prototypes of the "Kimber" pistol were shown at the 1995 SHOT Show.
Controversy swirled around the sample at the show, which were in fact made by Caspian Arms with the serial number and
manufacturer's identity hidden under the grip panels.
Then in late 1996 Edelman purchased Jerico and changed the name to Kimber Manufacturing. In April, 1997, Edelman closed Kimber's riflemaking facility in Oregon and moved the entire operation to Yonkers.
That's the history of how the Kimber 1911 came to be...

~ American Handgunner Sept/Oct 1997


Kimber has always used MIM parts. For the first guns, the parts were made in Spain with molds owned by Kimber. When they got the MIM machines in Yonkers, the molds came over here. Initially, even the bushings were MIM. This changed about 6 months into production with the delivery of two machines to make stainless steel bushings.

The Series II safety was introduced in 2001. No other parts on the gun were changed at that time. MIM then, MIM now.

When purchased by Kimber, Jerico was also making slides for Wilson Combat (and Kimber continued to make them for about 7 years.) Kimber and Wilson had an advertisement battle in 1997 as a result of Kimber advertising a gun worth $1500 for $615. Here is a blurb from American Handgunner in 1997 on the dueling ads:

Last edited by Kruzr; 11-24-2010 at 01:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-21-2007, 10:02 PM
jim293 jim293 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Yucaipa, Calif. (Southern)
Posts: 329
Thanks for the post. Some of the stuff I did not know. I do remember that ad though.
__________________
jim293
Kimber Tactical Pro II
Glock 21 and 43
Springfield XD Mod 2
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-21-2007, 10:18 PM
gmcal gmcal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 674
Good info. The "blurb" is not showing up.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 10-21-2007, 10:21 PM
stillwater's Avatar
stillwater stillwater is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,968
Thanks for the fun read, Kruzr.
__________________
"Rely not on the likelihood of the enemies not coming but on our own readiness to receive him" -SunTsu
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-21-2007, 10:58 PM
Kruzr's Avatar
Kruzr Kruzr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 13,220
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmcal
Good info. The "blurb" is not showing up.
? Shows to me. If you are getting a red X, try right clicking and copy the addy in Properties. Put that in the browser address box.

This article synopsis was first posted on the forum about 4 years ago by Sniper. It inspired me to find a copy of the magazine. American Handgunner also talked about Kimber's manufacturing process and QA/QC procedures. If I have time to upload them, I will. That will undoubtedly bring lots of responses like.."they sure don't do that anymore."

Last edited by Kruzr; 10-22-2007 at 12:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-21-2007, 11:14 PM
gmcal gmcal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 674
Shows up now, didn't earlier

Look forward to anything else you can post on the subject. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-22-2007, 06:37 AM
jimmy o jimmy o is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: texas,
Posts: 76
kruzr, thanks for the info,very interesting. gmcal i saw your 1911 in a post, nice gun
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-22-2007, 08:17 AM
F16DCC F16DCC is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 1,401
Thanks Kruzr,

This is a great thread! I have a couple questions for anyone who knows...

1. Why would a gun company like Kimber move to Yonkers, N.Y. ???

2. At what point did Kimber go from small, great 1911 building company to the larger, um... maybe too big, company today?

3. Any other info?


Here is some info from Wikipedia, if you guys believe anything printed there. I heard that they are not always the truth of information...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimber_Manufacturing

Thanks!
__________________
It ain't how hard you can hit; it's about how hard ya can get hit and keep moving forward... Rocky Balboa, 2006.

Last edited by F16DCC; 10-22-2007 at 08:21 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-22-2007, 08:40 AM
jpaul jpaul is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by F16DCC
Thanks Kruzr,

This is a great thread! I have a couple questions for anyone who knows...

1. Why would a gun company like Kimber move to Yonkers, N.Y. ???

2. At what point did Kimber go from small, great 1911 building company to the larger, um... maybe too big, company today?

3. Any other info?


Here is some info from Wikipedia, if you guys believe anything printed there. I heard that they are not always the truth of information...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimber_Manufacturing

Thanks!
I will take a stab at #1 and I may very well be wrong.

Most of the metal manufacturing in the US is done in the northeast. Of course there is some everywhere but the majority of it is in that area. I would think that the cost of doing business in the metal industry would be cheaper there than out west. From raw materials to the supplies to skilled labor there is more of it there than anywhere else.

May have been something as simple as he owned a building in Yonkers and he didn't in Oregon. Things that happen don't always makes sense.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-22-2007, 09:58 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Florence, Alabama, USA
Posts: 21,336
Was the above article the one in which the author tore down a Kimber and a Wilson and found no visible or measureable internal difference except that the Wilson "showed signs of hand fitting on the sear"?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-22-2007, 11:13 AM
Kruzr's Avatar
Kruzr Kruzr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 13,220
Jim, some of that is in this article and some in the "Jerico vs. Jerico" article that compared Jerico a built Kimber, Wilson and Ithaca. I'll post that one also.

Here is the entire article from American Handgunner:




Last edited by Kruzr; 11-24-2010 at 01:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-22-2007, 11:28 AM
Fred's Avatar
Fred Fred is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: CA
Posts: 1,085
Great read!

Thanks, Kruzr!
__________________
Regards,
AZFred - ONB
NRA member
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-22-2007, 11:46 AM
Kruzr's Avatar
Kruzr Kruzr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 13,220
The Jerico vs. Jerico Article - 1997








Last edited by Kruzr; 11-24-2010 at 01:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-22-2007, 05:52 PM
Huevos Huevos is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Idaho
Age: 64
Posts: 3,353
Thanks Kruzr! Marking this one for future referrence....
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-22-2007, 06:43 PM
sdgeorge sdgeorge is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 753
Love those Kimber 1911s!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-22-2007, 07:41 PM
Pollux Pollux is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 458
Kruzr, thanks for pulling out and sharing with us those old articles. Nice read!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:19 AM
AZ Husker's Avatar
AZ Husker AZ Husker is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 20,082
This should be made a "sticky"!
__________________
Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:34 AM
Armorer Armorer is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 123
This should be mailed into Kimber as a little reminder--
and now for some fighting words:
For a 1,500 dollar gun these days, I'd rather own a 615 dollar piece.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-14-2007, 09:56 AM
Kruzr's Avatar
Kruzr Kruzr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 13,220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armorer
This should be mailed into Kimber as a little reminder--
and now for some fighting words:
For a 1,500 dollar gun these days, I'd rather own a 615 dollar piece.
And today, that $1500 dollar gun of 1997 is closer to $2500+, while the $615 gun runs about $750.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-14-2007, 05:47 PM
Armorer Armorer is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 123
Exactly-- Seeing the number of broken hammers and such from broached MIM on Raptors, CDPII, and the like? I'd consider a stainless SA springer or Taurus a 750 dollar gun, and a much better investment. This is how my spending has gone, and will continue to do so until Kimber takes a look at how they're alienating a chunk of the market.
And while you might not get all the niceties of a Kimber, out of an 800 dollar gun, it's still a good platform to send off to any reputable smith as a base for a carry or competition project.
I know I'm not making any friends pointing this out, but since they brought in that Remington guy to handle most of their production, he's made a major assembly line out of a "semi-custom" line...with adding just so many limited, commemoratives, and the ilk per year, we're the ones who suffer a drop off in all the wrong areas-- least of all price.
I'm not saying that marginalizing is the way to go, but for the extended expenditures, I'd do for 4 less kimber models a year for a better gun closer to what the consumers can afford.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-14-2007, 06:21 PM
AZ Husker's Avatar
AZ Husker AZ Husker is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 20,082
Exactly why an early Kimber Custom Classic (their only model) was such a success, and are sought after today.
__________________
Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-23-2007, 07:38 PM
RdB RdB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Connecticustan
Age: 59
Posts: 5,496
I remember those articles well, and they were the catalyst for my first Kimber purchase, a 1998 Gold Match. I paid $820

For the record, it still has all its ORIGINAL MIM parts, less the bushing. The gun has around 22,000 rounds through it.
__________________
Russ
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-27-2007, 02:00 AM
russel5150 russel5150 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: cleveland oklahoma
Posts: 1,370
very good read! i remember those kimber ads, and wanted a custom classic for a long time.

sad to say last year i bought a custom II and was not very pleased. i wouldnt hesitate to buy an older kimber now, except ive grown to hate the looks of the front slide serrations.. lol..

it does make you wonder of wilson though... is the extra 1000 bucks worth it? im not someone who thinks so.. but thats just me.

thanks again for the great read!

russel
SDMF
__________________
TUNNEL VISION KILLS
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-27-2007, 02:08 AM
pacopper pacopper is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 113
Very interesting, and educational. Thanks for the post.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-27-2007, 05:33 AM
Gary1911A1 Gary1911A1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Ohio for now.
Age: 67
Posts: 4,992
Thanks for the post. I wish Kimber would still make them like that. I guess at 55 I like almost everything made the way it was though.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:29 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved