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  #1  
Old 01-12-2019, 02:42 PM
sc1911cwp sc1911cwp is offline
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Cleaning magazines

What is the best way to do this? Seems simple enough. Your experiences and recommenxations. I have never bothered before.
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2019, 02:53 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
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Take apart, throw in ultrasonic. Wipe and resemble.
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  #3  
Old 01-12-2019, 05:19 PM
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Butthead Butthead is offline
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Even cheaper is a gun cleaning patch dipped into your favorite solvent.

Ultrasonic cleaner to clean mags. $$$$
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  #4  
Old 01-12-2019, 05:55 PM
Kilrb Kilrb is offline
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Originally Posted by Butthead View Post
Even cheaper is a gun cleaning patch dipped into your favorite solvent.

Ultrasonic cleaner to clean mags. $$$$
I am with the solvent on patch, I stick them on a wire tie and just pull them through quick an easy
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  #5  
Old 01-12-2019, 06:43 PM
mil spec mil spec is offline
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Kleen Bore Mag-Brush https://www.brownells.com/gun-cleani...-prod8764.aspx
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  #6  
Old 01-12-2019, 07:05 PM
f1racefan f1racefan is offline
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Same as most mentioned here. Just be sure the inside of the mag is nice and dry before you put rounds back in it. I've heard of people putting some type of oil in the inside of the mag body, but I feel that's a big no-no.
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  #7  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:40 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
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Hose them down with Kano Kroil.

Then let them sit overnight. Blow them out with compressed air the next day and done.
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  #8  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:51 PM
frogfurr frogfurr is offline
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I have a couple of these but I don't think these are made anymore.
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  #9  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:34 PM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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Disassemble, wash, dry, put a very thin coat of clp wipe the excess.
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  #10  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:50 PM
terdog55 terdog55 is offline
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I invert them and spray brake cleaner from the base, let them drip on a clean cloth and note what, if anything, comes out of them.

Never had a problem.
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  #11  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:58 PM
557 557 is offline
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Then let them sit overnight. Blow them out with compressed air the next day and done.
Just the compressor for me. Havenít found one so dirty 200 psi wonít do the trick all on its own.
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  #12  
Old 01-13-2019, 12:20 AM
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Usually just a quick wipe of the feed lips and follower with a dry rag. After a few uses I'll disassemble them, stuff a rag from the bottom up through the top then reassemble. Solvent usually isn't needed unless you forgo cleaning long enough to allow them them to get caked up with fouling. Lastly I'll wipe the outsides with a CLP-dampened rag to prevent rust, but I leave the insides dry.
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  #13  
Old 01-13-2019, 01:35 AM
mangeek mangeek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Usually just a quick wipe of the feed lips and follower with a dry rag. After a few uses I'll disassemble them, stuff a rag from the bottom up through the top then reassemble. Solvent usually isn't needed unless you forgo cleaning long enough to allow them them to get caked up with fouling. Lastly I'll wipe the outsides with a CLP-dampened rag to prevent rust, but I leave the insides dry.
This ^^^^. I keep mine dry inside also. No solvents. Though, differing from dsk, I use compressed air most of the time. We have a compressed air device used to blow dust off our PC computers, and it works very well for Mags that get dropped in sand during USPSA matches. I will also stuff a rag through like dsk if needed though.

Last edited by mangeek; 01-13-2019 at 01:49 AM.
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  #14  
Old 01-13-2019, 02:28 AM
SVTNate SVTNate is offline
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Disassemble, Simple Green with a gun-specific 2-sided nylon bristle brush, rinse with hot water, air compressor to dry, done.

I like the 2-sided nylon brush rather than a tooth brush. The little side will get inside the mag body where it's too narrow for the big bristle side of the brush, plus scrub the underside of the follower.

Same method cleans my Glock mags, CZ, HK, Beretta, Sig, etc. mags. Any mag, really, that can be disassembled.
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  #15  
Old 01-13-2019, 05:03 AM
mil spec mil spec is offline
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I have a couple of these but I don't think these are made anymore.
You are right. I didn't notice that. It wasn't a year ago I had ordered on from Brownells.
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  #16  
Old 01-13-2019, 05:17 AM
Totally Tactical Totally Tactical is offline
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If your shooting competition and dropping empties in the dirt then they should be taken apart and cleaned after each range trip.
For just going to the range and leaving the empty mag on the shooting bench , my usual cleaning is to press the follower down and take a rag with some Birchwood Casey Gunscrubber on it and wipe the inside of the feed lips and follower as best as I can.
Outside gets a mist of Birchwood Casey Barriacade to prevent rust.
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  #17  
Old 01-13-2019, 05:41 AM
combat auto combat auto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Usually just a quick wipe of the feed lips and follower with a dry rag. After a few uses I'll disassemble them, stuff a rag from the bottom up through the top then reassemble. Solvent usually isn't needed unless you forgo cleaning long enough to allow them them to get caked up with fouling. Lastly I'll wipe the outsides with a CLP-dampened rag to prevent rust, but I leave the insides dry.
This is basically what I do also...I don't usually take them apart unless I drop them at the sandy range (or have an ad hoc special reason to take them apart). ...If there is a need, I'll give the front of the follower a small amount of One-Shot CLP, cures as a dry lube in 60 seconds or so, really neat stuff.
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Last edited by combat auto; 01-13-2019 at 07:48 AM.
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  #18  
Old 01-13-2019, 06:54 AM
passx passx is offline
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So let me ask this, over the time i’ve been following this forum it’s been consistently said to leave the mags dry, don’t get any oil inside or all hell and damnation will follow. While it’s highly recommended to run the gun (1911) wet, so what happens if you have oil in the mags ?

Myself, I try to take my mags part periodically and just wipe/deburr them maybe yearly. I try to keep them dry inside and maybe wipe the outside off with the rag used to remove any excess oil wiped off a gun after cleaning, nothing more. Maybe a short spray of a dry film lube once clean. I’m assuming keeping the inside dry is to avoid collecting any dirt there.

So why the heavy emphasis on keeping the mags dry ?
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  #19  
Old 01-13-2019, 07:13 AM
557 557 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passx View Post
So let me ask this, over the time iíve been following this forum itís been consistently said to leave the mags dry, donít get any oil inside or all hell and damnation will follow. While itís highly recommended to run the gun (1911) wet, so what happens if you have oil in the mags ?

Myself, I try to take my mags part periodically and just wipe/deburr them maybe yearly. I try to keep them dry inside and maybe wipe the outside off with the rag used to remove any excess oil wiped off a gun after cleaning, nothing more. Maybe a short spray of a dry film lube once clean. Iím assuming keeping the inside dry is to avoid collecting any dirt there.

So why the heavy emphasis on keeping the mags dry ?
I keep a lot of loaded mags around in dusty conditions. A dusty/ dirty dry mag functions and is easy to clean. An oily mag would be a gummy poor feeding mag (especially in the winter) that would take time and effort to clean. I donít care what my mags look like I just want them to function.
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  #20  
Old 01-13-2019, 08:48 AM
MarkS20 MarkS20 is online now
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I don't think it would be hard to get a suitably long straight brush of proper bristle size and bend it into the same shape.

Take care,
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  #21  
Old 01-13-2019, 09:37 AM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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Blast them out with brake cleaner. No oil, and Kroil is not a good idea in a mag because it will leave an oil residue. Oil or any other lubricant poses several problems in a magazine - it can cause the feed lips to fail earlier and possibly could permeate the primer and cause a misfire. The feed lips depend on friction to help hold the rounds in place, and when lubricated, the reduced friction may allow the rounds to creep higher, forcing the lips apart. This can also cause the next round to jump forward under recoil from the previous round, sometimes causing a double-feed jam.
Anything oily is also going to hold any particulate matter coming its way.
I've seen some really dirty mags, and I had one myself. I had an FEG AK that came with a 5-round mag which I always used at the range. I really didn't shoot it much but over 20 years the rounds add up. Finally the mag failed on me and I was figuring how I could re-spring it. When I took it apart, it was filthy from firing residues so I cleaned it - after which it worked fine again. I eventually sold the rifle but kept that mag since its perfect for shooting AK-types from the bench.
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  #22  
Old 01-13-2019, 11:01 AM
jtq jtq is offline
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Originally Posted by passx View Post

So why the heavy emphasis on keeping the mags dry ?
From Wilson's mag instructions

https://s3.amazonaws.com/wilsoncomba...s/47Series.pdf

Quote:
It is not absolutely necessary to lubricate your magazine pri- or to assembly, however a thin film of dry graphite or light oil will provide for slightly smoother follower movement. Do not use grease, excessive amounts of lubricant or penetrating oil. This could entrap con- taminates inside your magazine leading to erratic feeding behavior, or deactivate the primers of your ammunition.
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  #23  
Old 01-13-2019, 11:03 AM
jtq jtq is offline
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Note Wilson's polymer followers have an awful lot of bearing surface inside the tube. A GI or Devel follower have very little.
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  #24  
Old 01-13-2019, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passx View Post
So let me ask this, over the time i’ve been following this forum it’s been consistently said to leave the mags dry, don’t get any oil inside or all hell and damnation will follow. While it’s highly recommended to run the gun (1911) wet, so what happens if you have oil in the mags ?
Oil inside the magazines will attract dirt and lint, and this will get onto your ammo which in turn fed into the chamber. Oiling the insides of a magazine is only suggested if you're in an extremely damp and humid environment where rust is an even bigger problem, and then they need to be cleaned out often.

As a general rule don't disassemble magazines more often than you have to, as springs and feed lips are easily bent and the more you screw with them the greater the likelihood you'll damage something.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #25  
Old 01-13-2019, 05:31 PM
pogo123 pogo123 is offline
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new approach?

For the magazines I have with removable base pads, I pull them apart, then run a Swiffer Sweeper cloth thru them. Those clothes have a slight impregnation of silicone based oil to facilitate picking up dust off the floor when dry mopping - good enough for picking up dust off a hard floor, good enough for the inside of my magazines.

For those magazines I can't dis-assemble, I compress the spring with the follower, and use the SS cloth - in & out.

For my competition mags, usually spray a dry film lube before reassembly.
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