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  #1  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:15 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Lead in my blood

Had a routine physical and found lead to be elevated. Supposed to be less than 5 ideally. Mine is 10. So, it’s conskdered to be on the high end of the low end if that makes sense.

I guess I need to use gloves now when i clean and wash hands with lead removal soap when I shoot.

Anyone else with opinions on this?
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  #2  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:19 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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When I go shooting I always wash my face and hands with soap and cold water immediately afterwards (the ranges I go to all have bathrooms), then have a shower and change my clothes as soon as I get home. If you visit an indoor range it's also important to verify that they're in compliance with OSHA and EPA laws. A lot of the ones around me have been busted and fined several times.
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  #3  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:20 PM
PolymerMan PolymerMan is offline
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How do you know it's not in the water. Solid metallic lead isn't readily absorbed by the skin, it needs to be solubilized first before it is absorbed.
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  #4  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:29 PM
slopemeno slopemeno is offline
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It's very likely shooting related. The smallest effort towards hygiene will result in your level going down quickly. I was in the industrial battery world for a while and had several employees who I had to have lead tested.

1) Wash your hands with cold water. Focus on the areas between your fingers. Hot water increases absorption.
2) Change your clothes after shooting.
3) Wash down your door handles, controls, steering wheel in your car.
4) Get tested regularly until your level comes down.
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  #5  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:32 PM
Timbo3 Timbo3 is online now
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Typically from inhalation or ingestion are the common modes of entry in the industrial setting. Poor hygiene practices such as washing hands is where's most people I just it. Pick up a nice bread sandwich and the bread will collect it like a magnet.
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  #6  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:03 PM
malmon45 malmon45 is offline
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If you're like me who shoots mostly at indoor ranges, then wearing a mask would most definitely help. My lead level was at 19, then it dropped to 16 when I started wearing an N95 mask, now I am at 6.

This is a before and after pic, look at how much soot and dirt we inhale in one range session.
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  #7  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:10 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malmon45 View Post
If you're like me who shoots mostly at indoor ranges, then wearing a mask would most definitely help. My lead level was at 19, then it dropped to 16 when I started wearing an N95 mask, now I am at 6.

This is a before and after pic, look at how much soot and dirt we inhale in one range session.
How long did it take to drop?
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  #8  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:17 PM
malmon45 malmon45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
How long did it take to drop?
My lead level in 2016 was at 16, last year it dropped to 6. I am due for my annual checkup next month so hopefully it goes down even more.
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  #9  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:24 PM
YVK YVK is offline
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Three years ago my lead level went to about 20. I started a comprehensive lead reduction program that included a respirator, dedicated clothing and shoes that are changed at the range and then gets washed, D-lead wipes and D-lead soap after the session, separate live and dry fire guns, no food at or after the shooting until I showered. My levels are now about 8.
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  #10  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:34 PM
magazineman magazineman is offline
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Wow. This reminds me of a thread a couple years ago about whether a pregnant wife should go to the range.

Between noise & lead, I say it sounds like holding off for a few months would be wise.
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  #11  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:35 PM
earlwb earlwb is offline
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I remember quite a few target competition shooters, who used the ranges a lot, winding up with high lead levels and having to quit shooting for a long time. Using lead bullets is a good way to get lead dust in the air. Plus the bullets impact the backstops and spray even more lead dust into the air. You would likely see this happen with enclosed or indoor ranges more than with the outdoor ranges.

Now if you cast bullets to use, then you are at risk too. Maybe even more so.
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  #12  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:46 PM
Plaidad Plaidad is offline
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Sorry to hear about your problem. I think you have gotten lots of good advice above. Look on the bright side - at least it's not a concentrated 230gr amount in a vital area!
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  #13  
Old 08-27-2018, 06:49 PM
400cor-bon 400cor-bon is offline
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Shoot outdoors
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  #14  
Old 08-27-2018, 07:24 PM
Sistema1927 Sistema1927 is online now
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One of the reasons why I don't go to indoor ranges. It is truly a blessing that the weather here allows outside shooting pretty much year round. I also make sure to wash up when I get home since all we have at my range are porta-potties.

I do some casting, but have always done it outdoors.
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  #15  
Old 08-27-2018, 07:33 PM
HT77 HT77 is offline
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A lot of ranges just don't have adequate ventilation. The one I go to a lot spent a ton of money improving theirs and it has made a world of difference.
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  #16  
Old 08-27-2018, 07:33 PM
7.62Kolectr 7.62Kolectr is online now
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One of the many reasons I had to leave work as an RSO at indoor ranges was my bi-annual blood tests. My lead levels rose to the point to where my dr recommended I find another line of work.
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  #17  
Old 08-27-2018, 07:35 PM
Deyomatic Deyomatic is offline
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I have a couple of ranges near me that have terrible ventilation- I know this because I get dizzy after about an hour- not sure if it's lead related.

One of them has signs all over that say, "Guns don't kill people- lead poisoning does! Wash your hands..."
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  #18  
Old 08-27-2018, 08:14 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7.62Kolectr View Post
One of the many reasons I had to leave work as an RSO at indoor ranges was my bi-annual blood tests. My lead levels rose to the point to where my dr recommended I find another line of work.
At what point did the doc advise?
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  #19  
Old 08-27-2018, 08:16 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Thanks for the advice guys. This is all pretty depressing.

I don’t do a good job with clean up. Looks like that needs to change.

Dedicated clothing and learn to change. Wash up better. Lead wipes....ugh.

Glad I checked it before it got out of control.

I am supposed to start to teach too.
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  #20  
Old 08-27-2018, 09:00 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Unfortunately I do most of my shoot indoors. I went to the local outdoor range on Saturday and the place was so packed that every bench was in use, and we were all sitting so close to one another each man was pelting the guy to his right with his ejected brass. It also ruled out standing, meaning I had to spend the entire range visit shooting from the bench (boooorrring...). At least at the indoor range I shoot offhand and can shoot as fast as I want. I just make sure to wash my hands and face really good with the D-Lead soap they provide after I'm done. Wearing a face mask as well wouldn't be a bad idea, actually.
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  #21  
Old 08-27-2018, 09:04 PM
YVK YVK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
At what point did the doc advise?
There is doc's advice and there are professional regulations at what levels you should be taken out of exposure. The latter is slightly more liberal, and the former is on doc's discretion. Some data suggests that even very low levels have been associated with consequences. In addition, lead is stored mainly in bones with a very long half life, and serum concentration doesn't always reflect total body content. So the doc can recommend to stop shooting if your levels are >5, and he/she won't be wrong.

P.S. to my first post: I also changed to TMJ ammo from FMJ and I canned all intentions to ever start reloading.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
I just make sure to wash my hands and face really good with the D-Lead soap they provide after I'm done.
I start with using a D-wipe on a deck/table and it invariably gets between dark gray to pitch black.

Last edited by YVK; 08-27-2018 at 09:10 PM.
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  #22  
Old 08-27-2018, 09:07 PM
jlag19 jlag19 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earlwb View Post
I remember quite a few target competition shooters, who used the ranges a lot, winding up with high lead levels and having to quit shooting for a long time. Using lead bullets is a good way to get lead dust in the air. Plus the bullets impact the backstops and spray even more lead dust into the air. You would likely see this happen with enclosed or indoor ranges more than with the outdoor ranges.

Now if you cast bullets to use, then you are at risk too. Maybe even more so.


With the advent of Hi Tek coating of boolits, this should be a big help with the lead exposure.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  #23  
Old 08-27-2018, 10:02 PM
cavelamb cavelamb is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malmon45 View Post



That picture just came up Wrong!
Looked like something else.
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  #24  
Old 08-27-2018, 10:10 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Omg!!!!!
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  #25  
Old 08-28-2018, 12:09 AM
FredS FredS is offline
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I shot at an indoor range quite a bit a few years back. After a check up my BLL was up to 65. The culprit was the indoor range with poor ventilation.

I joined an outside range and over time, with regular cilantro (liquid and edible), it ended up under 10 - but it takes time.

Also, if you happen to live in an urban area / city the environment alone contributes to higher than normal BLLs.
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