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  #1  
Old 03-27-2020, 07:27 PM
scubadad scubadad is offline
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When it is over

So when this whole virus thing finally blows over what are you going to add or subtract from your list of preps? Besides more ammo and tp

Tops on my list well really Mrs Scuba's is to expand the garden this year and start canning. Also going to get another freezer and buy a whole cow.
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  #2  
Old 03-27-2020, 07:30 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scubadad View Post
So when this whole virus thing finally blows over what are you going to add or subtract from your list of preps? Besides more ammo and tp

Tops on my list well really Mrs Scuba's is to expand the garden this year and start canning. Also going to get another freezer and buy a whole cow.
I love my freezer- and vacuum sealer. My canning is limited- but could easily be expanded
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Old 03-27-2020, 07:45 PM
Blue Glow Blue Glow is offline
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More limited first aid and simple medical DIY supplies. The "nobody is going to help us for a while if we needed help" realization finally set in with my wife. TP is a luxury... stopping the bleeding is not.
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  #4  
Old 03-27-2020, 07:51 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scubadad View Post
So when this whole virus thing finally blows over what are you going to add or subtract from your list of preps? Besides more ammo and tp

Tops on my list well really Mrs Scuba's is to expand the garden this year and start canning. Also going to get another freezer and buy a whole cow.
My only caution would be that you are probably more likely to lose power (and be stuck with 200 lbs of thawed meat) in a real shtf scenario... we did during past hurricanes. I'm rethinking this as well.
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Old 03-27-2020, 07:57 PM
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We already planned on doubling the garden. I think maybe more things with which to disinfect? Had to go buy more lysol wipes etc. Had to make purell. We just ate our last jar of canned green beans and the last spaghetti squash about a month ago.
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Old 03-27-2020, 07:58 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by flechero View Post
My only caution would be that you are probably more likely to lose power (and be stuck with 200 lbs of thawed meat) in a real shtf scenario... we did during past hurricanes. I'm rethinking this as well.
Access to electricity is a consideration... my food store routine is in another thread...
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:31 PM
Amos Iron Wolf Amos Iron Wolf is offline
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Reorganize and tune the plan for food and certain things. Get the wife doing what I usually do and keep end feeding basics as we use them. From Toothpaste to TP. And slack less on it myself as I do occasionally.

Maybe do some porch gardening. Can't put one in the yard without building a cage to keep it in for the darned deer. Push comes to shove sometime I may just have to lessen the impact of so many of them.

Ordered an up to date, Digital Phase I & Phase II scanner for monitoring not only public service, but a lot of other things too. Finally putting up a base antenna for ham radio. Will also put up another for the scanner and for my SDR dongle. Good to listen a lot near and far, and talk a little and local.

I sold a few optics and instead of buying another gun or ammo decided to put together a bit of a radio shack and get at least a mobile ham & GMRS rig in the van. Later in the wife's car.
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:47 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Hand sanitizer, that has proven itself to be the Achilles heel of my arrangements.

We will rectify this as it becomes available.
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  #9  
Old 03-27-2020, 08:49 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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From my food storage thread, since this seems to becoming the thread of record for post- SARS CoV-2 preps....

[QUOTE][Another thread, related to ammo shortages, delved briefly into potential food shortages. A regular here mentioned getting a stand alone freezer, and I shared some tips based on my own experiences... rather than hijack the existing thread, I thought it may be worthy of one of its own.

I don't consider myself a "prepper" per se, but I do like the idea of being relatively self sufficient for a period of time if necessary. I'm also somewhat cheap, simple, and have space available. So this is more of a larger than normal scale food storage as a "lifestyle" rather than a prepping thread.... its it's also predicated on the assumption that one doesn't want to live on $10 per head per meal commercial "survival" food loaded with chemical crap and that one can actually cook a little...

I have a large chest freezer. Its moderately full, and its contents are rotated through. The tricks Ive found to long tearm meat storage are:

- Invest in a decent vacuum sealer. $150 from Walmart or Costco. This allows for 2 things- storing food in usage- size portions, and increases freezer life. Meat in a ziploc freezer bag is good for about 6 months. Vacuum packed (and prepared) its a year or better.

- Prep meat before freezing. Dry it for a day or 2 in the refrigerator, wrapped in cheese, on a rack over a tray of rock salt. This removes much of the water added to meat, prevents freezer burn and texture damage from ice buildup.

- Buy in bulk or sale/ "yellow tag" when possible. I get pork loins at Sams for <$2 a pound. I cut them into 1-1.5" chops, pack and freeze them. Same thing with boneless chicken thighs. I catch ribeye or roasts on sale, and prep and freeze them. Most of my lamb is "yellow tag", discounted a day or 2 before the sell by date. Loin chops that retail for $10 a pound for $3.50, legs for $3 a pound.... I still have 50lbs of pork butt at $0.70/lb that will become sausage when I get around to it...

- Be organized. Label and date everything. Come up with a way to ensure good rotation. Live off the top layer, and re stock below.

Dry goods- rice, beans, flour, sugar, salt pasta etc... 3 and 5 gallon, food grade buckets, available at Lowe's or Home Depot, are your best friend. Most of these things have an almost indefinite shelf life, when kept in a cool place out of the sun... I usually have 2 buckets of each, using one and rotating as one becomes empty.*

Cooking oils- again bought in bulk, kept cool and in the dark. Long life.

Herbs and spices. What good is eating if its bland and boring? Bought in quanty on line, divided into usable portion, vacuum sealed and frozen...

These are just a few of the things I've done over the years... what are your tips and tricks?

[QUOTE]

Looking forward, perhaps cold storage for onions, carrots, celery- the trinity of arromatics, as well as potatos and such. Maybe a garden, if I can store and consume the reapings....
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I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain. ~ John Adams
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  #10  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:42 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is offline
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I have been pretty well prepared. For this one, this set of circumstances.

If any learnings from this coronavirus, it is to prepare for the worst a little bit sooner. Pay attention to seemingly distant threats a little sooner.

I prepared -- just a little at a time -- for the current troubles in January and February.

But if I had to do it again, I would have done more than a little at a time. I would have presumed the worst at an earlier point in time.

In relation to firearms and ammo, I'm already supplied for life. So no concerns on that front. But I understand that some others are trying to shop only now. That cannot be easy...and that's not good. Seeing gun-ban types surfacing on the media, specifically attempting to use a crisis to hinder firearm/ammo purchases, is maddening (although hardly unexpected, as it's their textbook modus operandi).
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 03-27-2020 at 09:45 PM.
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  #11  
Old 03-27-2020, 11:45 PM
NonHyphenAmerican NonHyphenAmerican is offline
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I do a half beef and half pig. Our local meat locker smokes the ham and bacon, then saw cuts ham steaks and vacuum shrink wraps them.

I'd just picked up a half pig and half beef as well as put a 170 pound deer in the freezer in December.

So when all of this hit, my usual "Eagle Boy Scout Be Prepared" attitude started looking pretty dang smart.

So I'm not planning on changing anything.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2020, 06:13 AM
combat auto combat auto is online now
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Toilet paper for months (and other paper-products), and a second freezer to store more meat, more frozen veggies, and more bread...Rather not eat my several months of canned food and 20year dried beef when a CV type disaster comes. The canned stuff might make sense in a more significant disaster, anyway that was my intention with it. I would have never thought a "bug" not too dissimilar to flue would cause such a dislocation of food and "paper" distributions in this country.

Also more water, I have 2-3 months now, but plastic starts breaking down after that and creating leaks. So I have to get more of the caned water which has a 20 year shelf life (I have some of that).

The overall lesson learned is how fragile our society is. Not only the processes, but the people many of who are not use to having any adversity in their life and are open to panic easily. Our nation is soft from excessive comfort and the good life (which isn't necessarily a bad thing - until the SHTF). Think about it, only about 7% of the living US population has served in the military (where one does have plenty of adversity)...There are other ways to experience adversity, like dealing with significant health challenges, but in today's "Nanny-Society" it is becoming a rarer thing than in the past.

That all said, I am very impressed with many Americans working in the medical establishment and even in the food stores. They are all Hero's to me.

(I don't always agree with the medical establishment BTW, but I still think exposing themselves like they do every day is very couragous).
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Last edited by combat auto; 03-28-2020 at 06:33 AM.
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  #13  
Old 03-28-2020, 07:02 AM
Timbo3 Timbo3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combat auto View Post
Toilet paper for months (and other paper-products), and a second freezer to store more meat, more frozen veggies, and more bread...Rather not eat my several months of canned food and 20year dried beef when a CV type disaster comes. The canned stuff might make sense in a more significant disaster, anyway that was my intention with it. I would have never thought a "bug" not too dissimilar to flue would cause such a dislocation of food and "paper" distributions in this country.

Also more water, I have 2-3 months now, but plastic starts breaking down after that and creating leaks. So I have to get more of the caned water which has a 20 year shelf life (I have some of that).

The overall lesson learned is how fragile our society is. Not only the processes, but the people many of who are not use to having any adversity in their life and are open to panic easily. Our nation is soft from excessive comfort and the good life (which isn't necessarily a bad thing - until the SHTF). Think about it, only about 7% of the living US population has served in the military (where one does have plenty of adversity)...There are other ways to experience adversity, like dealing with significant health challenges, but in today's "Nanny-Society" it is becoming a rarer thing than in the past.

That all said, I am very impressed with many Americans working in the medical establishment and even in the food stores. They are all Hero's to me.

(I don't always agree with the medical establishment BTW, but I still think exposing themselves like they do every day is very couragous).
Right on! A big salute and thank you to all the medical folks. I think we all need to look at this as a fire drill and be better prepared for the next one. Myself a vacuum sealer and freezer. I'm pretty much set for the rest.
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  #14  
Old 03-28-2020, 07:12 AM
Welder Guy Welder Guy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
From my food storage thread, since this seems to becoming the thread of record for post- SARS CoV-2 preps....

Quote:
[Another thread, related to ammo shortages, delved briefly into potential food shortages. A regular here mentioned getting a stand alone freezer, and I shared some tips based on my own experiences... rather than hijack the existing thread, I thought it may be worthy of one of its own.

I don't consider myself a "prepper" per se, but I do like the idea of being relatively self sufficient for a period of time if necessary. I'm also somewhat cheap, simple, and have space available. So this is more of a larger than normal scale food storage as a "lifestyle" rather than a prepping thread.... its it's also predicated on the assumption that one doesn't want to live on $10 per head per meal commercial "survival" food loaded with chemical crap and that one can actually cook a little...

I have a large chest freezer. Its moderately full, and its contents are rotated through. The tricks Ive found to long tearm meat storage are:

- Invest in a decent vacuum sealer. $150 from Walmart or Costco. This allows for 2 things- storing food in usage- size portions, and increases freezer life. Meat in a ziploc freezer bag is good for about 6 months. Vacuum packed (and prepared) its a year or better.

- Prep meat before freezing. Dry it for a day or 2 in the refrigerator, wrapped in cheese, on a rack over a tray of rock salt. This removes much of the water added to meat, prevents freezer burn and texture damage from ice buildup.

- Buy in bulk or sale/ "yellow tag" when possible. I get pork loins at Sams for <$2 a pound. I cut them into 1-1.5" chops, pack and freeze them. Same thing with boneless chicken thighs. I catch ribeye or roasts on sale, and prep and freeze them. Most of my lamb is "yellow tag", discounted a day or 2 before the sell by date. Loin chops that retail for $10 a pound for $3.50, legs for $3 a pound.... I still have 50lbs of pork butt at $0.70/lb that will become sausage when I get around to it...

- Be organized. Label and date everything. Come up with a way to ensure good rotation. Live off the top layer, and re stock below.

Dry goods- rice, beans, flour, sugar, salt pasta etc... 3 and 5 gallon, food grade buckets, available at Lowe's or Home Depot, are your best friend. Most of these things have an almost indefinite shelf life, when kept in a cool place out of the sun... I usually have 2 buckets of each, using one and rotating as one becomes empty.*

Cooking oils- again bought in bulk, kept cool and in the dark. Long life.

Herbs and spices. What good is eating if its bland and boring? Bought in quanty on line, divided into usable portion, vacuum sealed and frozen...

These are just a few of the things I've done over the years... what are your tips and tricks?
Looking forward, perhaps cold storage for onions, carrots, celery- the trinity of arromatics, as well as potatos and such. Maybe a garden, if I can store and consume the reapings....

Use mylar bags with oxygen absorbers as well. Then put in the buckets.

Last edited by Welder Guy; 03-28-2020 at 07:15 AM.
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  #15  
Old 03-28-2020, 07:50 AM
scubadad scubadad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combat auto View Post
Toilet paper for months (and other paper-products), and a second freezer to store more meat, more frozen veggies, and more bread...Rather not eat my several months of canned food and 20year dried beef when a CV type disaster comes. The canned stuff might make sense in a more significant disaster, anyway that was my intention with it. I would have never thought a "bug" not too dissimilar to flue would cause such a dislocation of food and "paper" distributions in this country.

Also more water, I have 2-3 months now, but plastic starts breaking down after that and creating leaks. So I have to get more of the caned water which has a 20 year shelf life (I have some of that).

The overall lesson learned is how fragile our society is. Not only the processes, but the people many of who are not use to having any adversity in their life and are open to panic easily. Our nation is soft from excessive comfort and the good life (which isn't necessarily a bad thing - until the SHTF). Think about it, only about 7% of the living US population has served in the military (where one does have plenty of adversity)...There are other ways to experience adversity, like dealing with significant health challenges, but in today's "Nanny-Society" it is becoming a rarer thing than in the past.

That all said, I am very impressed with many Americans working in the medical establishment and even in the food stores. They are all Hero's to me.

(I don't always agree with the medical establishment BTW, but I still think exposing themselves like they do every day is very couragous).
Been thinking about more water as well (no pun intended)

My current set up is a well pump that feeds a 300 gallon storage tank. Then a smaller pump that supplies the house on demand. . Plan is to add another 300 gallon tank.
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  #16  
Old 03-28-2020, 07:52 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by Welder Guy View Post
Use mylar bags with oxygen absorbers as well. Then put in the buckets.
Good tip.... any recompense sources?
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I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain. ~ John Adams
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  #17  
Old 03-28-2020, 08:52 AM
Welder Guy Welder Guy is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
Good tip.... any recompense sources?
You can get them from Amazon, Uline, etc. Just Google search mylar bags. Some come with the absorbers and they come in different sizes. But they will help keep your dry goods preserved longer in the buckets.

Last edited by Welder Guy; 03-28-2020 at 08:56 AM.
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  #18  
Old 03-28-2020, 09:07 AM
countrydraftsman countrydraftsman is offline
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My big city nephew told his mother "If things get bad during this pandemic we can go live with Uncle Steve and Aunt Amy" (we have a nice farm). My wife was proud of him for having a plan (he is 16) and recognizing we were better prepared than most. Obviously, this would put a strain on our stocked supplies, resources, etc (reduce them by half instantly!). So his survival plan is to use what others have worked hard to assemble? Um, no. We are generous to a fault, but there is only so much to go around.

So for my preparation addition for the next disaster, I plan to start teaching him how to fish - rather than hand him my fish per his plan. He's not too young to learn how to purify water, and start stocking on essential goods, knowledge etc. There are a few other items I wish I had more of on hand - and I will add them, but I think the most bang for my buck will be limiting permanent visitors during crisis by teaching them how to take care of themselves.
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:19 AM
scubadad scubadad is offline
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Originally Posted by countrydraftsman View Post
My big city nephew told his mother "If things get bad during this pandemic we can go live with Uncle Steve and Aunt Amy" (we have a nice farm). My wife was proud of him for having a plan (he is 16) and recognizing we were better prepared than most. Obviously, this would put a strain on our stocked supplies, resources, etc (reduce them by half instantly!). So his survival plan is to use what others have worked hard to assemble? Um, no. We are generous to a fault, but there is only so much to go around.

So for my preparation addition for the next disaster, I plan to start teaching him how to fish - rather than hand him my fish per his plan. He's not too young to learn how to purify water, and start stocking on essential goods, knowledge etc. There are a few other items I wish I had more of on hand - and I will add them, but I think the most bang for my buck will be limiting permanent visitors during crisis by teaching them how to take care of themselves.
Good for you. Just because we prep does not mean we become the welfare agency for those who did not.
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Old 03-28-2020, 10:35 AM
SC shooter SC shooter is offline
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I think I am going to get a vacuum sealer. I have a good bit of beef, pork and deer in the freezer but it would be better to start vacuum sealing it.
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Old 03-28-2020, 01:11 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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I have mentioned this a time or two before.

But in case anyone missed it. I would advise, in addition to your other stores. That you order and put back a few cases of DATREX survival rations. These are what you will find in the life boats of any oceangoing vessel. It is like a coconut brownie, loaded with calories.

They have a five year use by date on them. But they will last much longer. We typically change them out after five years but tried them and they are fine. I am not sure that I would want anything shipped to my house from Louisiana right now, but down the road. Just another thing that most people do not know about.

https://www.datrex.com/
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Old 03-28-2020, 02:16 PM
Amos Iron Wolf Amos Iron Wolf is offline
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Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
But in case anyone missed it. I would advise, in addition to your other stores. That you order and put back a few cases of DATREX survival rations. These are what you will find in the life boats of any oceangoing vessel. It is like a coconut brownie, loaded with calories.

They have a five year use by date on them. But they will last much longer. We typically change them out after five years but tried them and they are fine. I am not sure that I would want anything shipped to my house from Louisiana right now, but down the road. Just another thing that most people do not know about.

https://www.datrex.com/
I keep some of the SOS lifeboat rations on hand and in the van. I need to add some more along the way.

Funny story. Before we moved I had some stashed up in the pantry. One day I was in there and didn't see them. I asked my wife what happened to them. She said she opened them and ate some. I said, "What? They were for an emergency!'

She replied, "I was hungry. It was an emergency."

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  #23  
Old 03-28-2020, 03:02 PM
PolymerMan PolymerMan is offline
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Originally Posted by flechero View Post
My only caution would be that you are probably more likely to lose power (and be stuck with 200 lbs of thawed meat) in a real shtf scenario... we did during past hurricanes. I'm rethinking this as well.
Something similar happened to me about a year ago.

I must have had at least $600-$1000 worth of frozen food in a large chest freezer at -10 degrees F. Worked great for 5 years. I would often buy food at the wholesale club when on sale. I had frozen Turkeys that I bought frozen after thanksgiving for 15 cents a lb, steaks, pork loins, frozen ready to eat foods like pizza, burritos, french fries, plus tons of sea food. My plan was to run the smallest generator that could easily run the freezer and the kitchen refrigerator. Bought a very efficient 2200 va, inverter generator that could run for a full day on 1 to 2 gals of gas.

My mistake is I had it in the garage on a GFI circuit. I had an extension cord plugged into the same circuit on the outside of the house and a massive rain storm hit.

The extension cord was sitting in a water puddle and that tripped the GFI.

Precisely what a GFI circuit is designed to do.

I wasn't aware of it despite the fact I had a freezer alarm, but that was battery operated and I couldn't hear it inside the house. Anyhow, it must have been at least 90 degrees F in the garage. A few days must have passed when I could smell a sweet-rotting odor which at first I though was another squirrel or rat that found its way into the attic and died. Had that problem years ago and fixed the hole the critters were getting in. Several more days passed and the smell got stronger so I started to investigate. I was planning on going into the attaic, but that is when I realized that the power light on the chest freezer was out.

When I opened the freezer the smell could knock a horse dead. I had to wear a full face gas mask with charcoal filters to pull that thing out of the garage.

Then the flies arrived. Even with gloves on, the odor of rotten food was on my hands, face, and clothes. It took literally 2 days for the odor that got on my arms to go away. It was a hell of a task, digging through the putrid liquid at the bottom of the freezer and pulling out bags of food that had ballooned with rotted food.

I have never smelled anything so foul.

Never replaced the freezer. I might but I will get an upright freezer I can keep inside the house with an alarm that will ring load.
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