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  #1  
Old 02-01-2020, 12:23 PM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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1969 Colt Question

Would a 69's slide be serial #d. Found a nice one but the slide and frame are different shades of blue at least it looks iike it in the picture. I was just wondering if its a mis matched slide and frame. Grips have shrunk up and their asking $1200 out the door for the gun. Just don't want to get a yard sale special and I'm not very knowledgeable yet. Thanks
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  #2  
Old 02-01-2020, 12:26 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is offline
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As far as I know not with the Gov model. If a GCNM then the last three digits of the serial number would be under the then Ellison rear sight. Of course you have to remove the rear sight to see it.
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  #3  
Old 02-01-2020, 06:29 PM
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Government Models did not have numbered slides after the end of WW2. What you are likely seeing is a plum-colored slide on the blued frame, which was common with those guns. Colt started down the long road of having QC issues beginning in the mid-1960s, and one of the apparent issues they had was getting the parts to blue properly without them turning a red or plum hue.
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  #4  
Old 02-01-2020, 06:38 PM
Infidel525 Infidel525 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Government Models did not have numbered slides after the end of WW2. What you are likely seeing is a plum-colored slide on the blued frame, which was common with those guns. Colt started down the long road of having QC issues beginning in the mid-1960s, and one of the apparent issues they had was getting the parts to blue properly without them turning a red or plum hue.
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  #5  
Old 02-02-2020, 06:01 AM
VF-1 VF-1 is offline
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Pictures would certainly help. But I’d scarf up a pre 70 Government model for $1,200.00 pretty quick! Just sayin’...
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Old 02-02-2020, 08:39 AM
filson filson is offline
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Oftentimes on 67-69 Government Models you'll find a color difference between the slide and frame. Small parts too often exhibit the same plum color variation.
As for the grip shrinkage, it was common in the later 50s and 60s pistols. Lastly, presuming the pistols finish is not scratched or damaged and is in excellent condition, $1200 out the door is an excellent price
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  #7  
Old 02-02-2020, 10:40 AM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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Originally Posted by VF-1 View Post
Pictures would certainly help. But I’d scarf up a pre 70 Government model for $1,200.00 pretty quick! Just sayin’...
I can't figure out how to post a picture I'm not very computer literate . I just noticed I didn't mention that the slide and its parts are what appears to be DARKER then the slide. Will be around some computer folks today will see if they can help me get some pictures posted. Thanks
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Old 02-02-2020, 11:12 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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If the pictures are on your hard drive you can attach them directly to your post.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #9  
Old 02-02-2020, 01:23 PM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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Here’s pictures of the pistol. What do you guys think. Thanks for the posting device I did on my cell phone couldn’t figure it out on my laptop.
Attached Thumbnails
E23AB8BE-CAA9-4A79-BE91-65E389907A94_1580670873088.jpeg   4C6AD812-92B8-4953-8376-3317CB3F41FB_1580670896897.jpeg  
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  #10  
Old 02-02-2020, 02:07 PM
filson filson is offline
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You're right, terribly shrunken stocks. I've never seen a pair that bad. I think someone removed them at some point. Over time they shrunk and the person probably heated the stocks to force them back on the pistol, at least fit over the grip screws. They are deformed and of zero value.
If you buy the pistol and look for late 1969 original stocks, expect they will be hard to find and expensive when you do locate a set.
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  #11  
Old 02-02-2020, 02:18 PM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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Originally Posted by filson View Post
You're right, terribly shrunken stocks. I've never seen a pair that bad. I think someone removed them at some point. Over time they shrunk and the person probably heated the stocks to force them back on the pistol, at least fit over the grip screws. They are deformed and of zero value.
If you buy the pistol and look for late 1969 original stocks, expect they will be hard to find and expensive when you do locate a set.
You think everything else ( differences in the slide/frame colors ) looks OK for the period $1200 is a decent price or to much since the grips are toast.
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2020, 03:33 PM
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I'd buy that for $1200 without thinking twice. Original grips (and reproductions) are out there, although most people simply go with nicer wood grips anyway.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2020, 09:13 PM
toocool45 toocool45 is offline
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Those are getting scarce. Value is on the upswing as usuall for colts. That era wont be getting any cheaper any time soon. So nows the time to purchase it if its still avail.
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  #14  
Old 02-02-2020, 09:40 PM
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One of the reasons why Colt came out with the new Classic model with its pre-70 rollmarks was because people were seeking out pre-70s for use as custom builds since the rollmarks are universally regarded as the nicest on a 1911. These same people were also wincing at the high prices of the base guns since they're now considered collectibles, and the new Classic offered a more affordable option.

While maximum value is attained with a mint unfired pistol with the original box and papers, even a clean but oft-fired pre-70 without the box can still fetch at least $1800.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #15  
Old 02-02-2020, 09:50 PM
Infidel525 Infidel525 is offline
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Originally Posted by hdswap View Post
You think everything else ( differences in the slide/frame colors ) looks OK for the period $1200 is a decent price or to much since the grips are toast.
If it were me that pistol would already be in my safe , everything looks right , I have a 70 National match that looks like that with the plum colored slide .
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  #16  
Old 02-03-2020, 08:57 AM
filson filson is offline
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By the way, i should have mentioned it earlier. If you choose to go with OEM stocks, the later production 1969 Government Model, including BB variant stocks, typically have a faint lighter, darker brown/orange color swirl not found on the earlier late 50s-60s production pistols.
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  #17  
Old 02-03-2020, 10:48 AM
army_eod army_eod is offline
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For 1200 I would throw on a set of stocks and shoot it.
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  #18  
Old 02-03-2020, 06:49 PM
Frank Vaccaro Frank Vaccaro is offline
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Originally Posted by hdswap View Post
Here’s pictures of the pistol. What do you guys think. Thanks for the posting device I did on my cell phone couldn’t figure it out on my laptop.
I like that, nice catch. Congratulations!
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  #19  
Old 02-03-2020, 07:10 PM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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Thanks again to everyone for your patience and wisdom, I really appreciate it. Looking forward to getting it in my hands to see it in person.
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  #20  
Old 02-03-2020, 07:20 PM
hdswap hdswap is offline
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Originally Posted by filson View Post
By the way, i should have mentioned it earlier. If you choose to go with OEM stocks, the later production 1969 Government Model, including BB variant stocks, typically have a faint lighter, darker brown/orange color swirl not found on the earlier late 50s-60s production pistols.
Thanks for the info. I was watching one on GB that had grips that looked like that, I thought they were after market because they were lighter in color. Not sure what I'll put on it, may play Jesse Stone or Longmire and put a pair of stag that I have on it for now.
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  #21  
Old 02-05-2020, 05:06 PM
filson filson is offline
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Mentioned in an earlier post the issues of late pre 70 Government Model color differences and stock shrinkage. Here's a 1968 Government Model. Stocks are in fine condition but you can see the color difference and rather shoddy appearance of the slide stop. Even the serial number has a slight imperfection. For 52 years old, the pistol is otherwise very nice and, in my estimation, characteristic of the late 60s workmanship and quality control.
Attached Thumbnails
D82A1CA2-34FC-4CC9-BF9D-A055E5AAE79F_1_201_a.jpeg   81DB683D-4A1B-4150-9E12-17079C679973_1_201_a.jpeg   3CDE029C-4E1E-4750-BBB1-85F30D9E5339_1_201_a.jpeg   E4658108-1D2B-41FB-BF75-61AAAA9491E1_1_201_a.jpeg  
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  #22  
Old 02-05-2020, 08:14 PM
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When Colt went through a buyout and new ownership in 1964 they lost a lot of their veteran workforce who were laid off or took early retirement. The new hires had a very steep learning curve, and that's why you often see Colts from this era through the 1970s with cosmetic anomalies such as wavy edges or mis-shapen triggerguards. A lot of the final shaping of the outside surfaces was still being done by hand and some workers did a better job than others.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #23  
Old 02-05-2020, 10:18 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
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dsk; You obviously know stuff about Colt 1911-guns.
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  #24  
Old 02-06-2020, 07:38 AM
SuperMan SuperMan is offline
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Nice catch and well worth the $1200...

Have a 1968 GM and a 1969 SUPER .38 both of which were purchased in the 1980s and were customized with BoMar sights ruining their collector value but made them so much more shootable...

I remember buying the 68 .45 at a gun show in Dallas. Older gentleman with a PEACH BASKET full of 1911s he had bought over the years and was now selling off. It came with the original receipt from a pawn shop where he had bought the gun back in the early 70s for like $86.00... Gun was unfired....

Pic #1: SUPER .38
Pic #2: SUPER .38 at 50'..10 rounds
Pic #3: 1968 GM .45 at 10 yards...14 rounds
Pic #4: 1968 GM .45 with matching Colt .22 Conversion Unit, Marvel Longside .22 Conversion and .400 CorBon barrel
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  #25  
Old 02-07-2020, 07:20 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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I'd buy that for $1200 without thinking twice. Original grips (and reproductions) are out there, although most people simply go with nicer wood grips anyway.
What he said on the grips. Forget about those originals. even non-shrunk ones are ugly.

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