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  #1  
Old 11-20-2019, 01:10 PM
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apipeguy apipeguy is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2013
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Indoor Range Season Has Begun

Our small private club has both a very nice outdoor range and an older small indoor range.

A friend of mine and myself open up the range for four hours a week for open shooting for anyone that wishes to come. This year we changed to doing it on Tuesdays from 8:00am til noon.

All summer I do defensive shooting drills outside and very much like shooting both steel and IDPA targets.

During the winter, we have a little more in the area of rules and no shooting from a holster, etc. so the winter is pretty much dedicated to 50’ bullseye shooting.

Took my Nelson Conversion with an Aimpoint Micro on it that resides on a S&W E-Series that I replaced all the innards with Wilson Bullet Proof parts. Did sear and hammer hook work and it has a trigger pull of about 2#. Did not shoot the .45 this week but will do so next week. I need to get some more bullseye loads made up for it as my stock is rather low. Surprised myself as to how well I did after not shooting any one hand bullseye all summer but definitely need to do some exercises to build up my arm strength. To get the wobble down a little.

Kind of excited about the winter shooting season as I no longer have a great deal of desire to go out to the outdoor range when the temp is in the teens and the snow is blowing.

Curious as to how many others change their shooting focus from one area to another as the seasons change.
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  #2  
Old 11-20-2019, 06:56 PM
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I only shoot outdoors during the summer, and even then less than a half-dozen trips per year. I only do it to sight in a rifle beyond 25 yards or shoot my black powder firearms. Otherwise I find having to sit at a bench with the rifle propped up on sandbags, shooting no more than ten rounds at a time while the range officers wait to pounce on anyone they feel is shooting too fast to be an absolute bore. The indoor range is only 25 yards, but at least I can shoot offhand and not worry about speed limits.

What I miss most is having a good place out in the woods to shoot on my own and shoot reactionary targets like steel plates or soup cans. Unfortunately the few places left where people actually CAN legally shoot look like a war zone and are in danger of being closed down like everywhere else.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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Old 11-20-2019, 08:48 PM
Amos Iron Wolf Amos Iron Wolf is offline
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Down this way it's more like the weather is finally cooling off enough to allow for extended range trips. It's all backwards here. When most people are getting their last rides of the season in and prepping their motorcycles for winter storage we're going, "Wow, finally some nice riding weather.

Granted, we get cold fronts that come through and turn damp, windy, and hit the low 30s. Some days just suck for one reason or the other, but generally October is more suited to going out and doing shoot and move stuff. Some people in the big cities like San Antonio seem to like going to indoor ranges year round regardless. Not for me, but I could appreciate that they would be nicer in the heat of South Texas summers.

Like I said, we're just sort of upside down here as regards seasons for doing a lot of things.
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  #4  
Old 11-20-2019, 09:10 PM
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Western WA rarely gets too cold to be able to shoot, but the perpetual rains and heavy cloud cover make everything soggy and the air cool and damp, so it's just not fun to be outdoors doing anything in the winter, let alone shooting. Eastern WA is more of a dry heat in the summer and dry cold in the winter. It gets colder there but with less precipitation, and there are probably a lot more outdoor recreation days each year than over here where the trolls and troglodytes live.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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Old 11-20-2019, 09:12 PM
Boarhunter Boarhunter is offline
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I hit a local indoor range almost daily all year long. Sometimes I shoot 100 rounds; sometimes as few as 5. Just depends on time availability and attitude.

I don't have to worry with rain or wind, but indoor temperatures can range from freezing to sweltering depending on season since the range is not climate controlled.

I figure that just makes the shooting more challenging.

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Old 11-20-2019, 10:30 PM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is online now
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The last 2 range trips were to an indoor handgun only range. Was pretty cold and windy and i didnt feel like setting up steel and paper targets at the outdoor club i belong to, in addiition to when I go to the outdoor range, ill always take a rifle or 2. Ive gone and shot in the snow, once we’re in full winter mode and its not ridiculously cold and windy.
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  #7  
Old 11-23-2019, 10:38 PM
BillW BillW is offline
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DSK

Ya'll come see me in Wyoming. We have a public range where I volunteer as a RSO a couple days a week. Although we only have a 100 yard rifle range at this time (we are working on a 300 yard range) we aren't quite so restrictive with your shooting activities. We also have a 50 yard and 25 yard outdoor range and a 25 yard indoor range with very few restrictions. The 25 yard outdoor range has two dueling trees for pistols. As long as you are shooting safely I will leave you alone with whatever activity you want to engage in!

Last edited by BillW; 11-23-2019 at 10:42 PM.
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Old 11-23-2019, 11:15 PM
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If I ever come to Wyoming I may have to take you up on that. Just today I was at the indoor range with my AR, and the place was packed. They had to give me the lane at the far end of the members bay, and the target carrier was broken and wouldn't move on its track. So I waited until another lane opened up, started shooting and suddenly had to be told cease-fire by the RSO because my rounds were splashing back. I guess their backstop was full of metal or somehow damaged.

And so they sent me over to the public bay, again to the last lane against the wall. And the target carrier on that one was broken too and wouldn't travel more than a few yards. So I just packed up and left.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #9  
Old 11-23-2019, 11:34 PM
BillW BillW is offline
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We don't have any rifle shooting at the indoor range. Our outdoor range isn't as sophisticated as yours, we have target stands at 50 or 100 yards, depending on the range. But I have never had an issue with brass causing an issue for another shooter. I have yet to have more than half of the shooting positions in use.
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  #10  
Old 11-24-2019, 04:44 AM
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Here in NE Florida, the weather has finally cooled enough for out door shooting. I’m a member of a great outdoor range. Rifle out to 200+ yards, individual pistol ranges with steel reaction targets. Only 45 minutes away. Great club. I’ll be out there two, three times a week now till late May when it will again turn too hot until late Fall. Love this time of year.
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Old 11-24-2019, 05:35 AM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is online now
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Yesterday was a good outdoor shooting day, 40 degrees and cloudy and minimal wind.
Good day to let the dogs go comb the fields for some of the chukkers that survived an earlier hunt. I was on the range when my friend that manages the club brought over a piece of 1” ballistic glass/plexiglas from a LE barracks being renovated. He planned to make a table top with. He asked me to add some character to it with some bullet marks. So shoot it we did, all from 25 yards for safety. 9mm 124gr, 38 super 129 gr, 9mm hollow point, 40 self defense round, 12 gauge #5. It held up very well, maybe too well. (You know where this is going, right?). I asked if he minded if i shot it with my 6.5 CM, (all in the interest of science of course). 6.5 CM went through it like butter. Was 140 gr ELD match round. So, our scientific study shows, well, you can draw your own conclusion......
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