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  #1  
Old 12-05-2015, 09:00 PM
16-1911s 16-1911s is offline
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When coating or painting a 1911 slide deux

Is it nessesary to coat the inside of the slide also ?
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2015, 06:30 AM
Steve in Allentown Steve in Allentown is offline
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Necessary? No.

Advisable? In my opinion, no, if you're referring to stuff like cerakote and gunkote. For stuff like hard chrome, NP3, tennifer, and ionbond my answer would be yes.
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Old 12-06-2015, 08:21 AM
EvolutionArmory EvolutionArmory is offline
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Yes, it is necessary to coat as much of the surface as possible. If you properly prepped your parts for paint, you blasted them. If you don't paint the inside of the gun, a carbon steel gun will rust. A non issue with stainless but if you are going to go through the trouble of painting it, why wouldn't you want to do it right?

Spray and bake coatings go wrong when people cut corners, not because of the product.
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2015, 10:32 AM
Steve in Allentown Steve in Allentown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvolutionArmory View Post
Spray and bake coatings go wrong when people cut corners, not because of the product.
Mark, this subject is of great interest to me. Your work speaks for itself so your insights would be most appreciated. I have no personal experience with cerakote but I have several 1911s that have been through the ionbond process.

We all know that any finish will wear. There has been a recent thread here that is critical of cerakote durability. Basically, the consenus of experience and opinion in that thread was that any painted method is inferior and will wear very rapidly.

Are you saying that cerakote on the inside of the slide will stand up to heat, oil, and physical contact with the barrel lugs/hood?

Last edited by Steve in Allentown; 12-06-2015 at 10:39 AM.
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Old 12-06-2015, 01:11 PM
EvolutionArmory EvolutionArmory is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve in Allentown View Post
Mark, this subject is of great interest to me. Your work speaks for itself so your insights would be most appreciated. I have no personal experience with cerakote but I have several 1911s that have been through the ionbond process.

We all know that any finish will wear. There has been a recent thread here that is critical of cerakote durability. Basically, the consenus of experience and opinion in that thread was that any painted method is inferior and will wear very rapidly.

Are you saying that cerakote on the inside of the slide will stand up to heat, oil, and physical contact with the barrel lugs/hood?
Heat and oil, yes. Cerakote excels in these 2 areas. Any moving part will show wear with time. Cerakote any exposed surface. You already have the paint mixed, the oven set up and your parts wired up. Why not apply it as professionally as possible, yes?

Dave. Mark is too busy answering emails to post on forums.

My thoughts on Cerakote are that it is a decent finish that gunsmith's can offer for very little cash invested. You can buy a reasonably priced airbrush, compressor and oven and if you have a basic level of painting skill, a person can get above average results. It has its pluses and minuses like most finishes. I much rather prefer Ionbond, black nitride or hard chrome but I have to charge my customers double what a Cerakote job costs.
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Last edited by EvolutionArmory; 12-06-2015 at 01:17 PM.
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  #6  
Old 12-06-2015, 01:59 PM
jamiesaun jamiesaun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve in Allentown View Post
Mark, this subject is of great interest to me. Your work speaks for itself so your insights would be most appreciated. I have no personal experience with cerakote but I have several 1911s that have been through the ionbond process.

We all know that any finish will wear. There has been a recent thread here that is critical of cerakote durability. Basically, the consenus of experience and opinion in that thread was that any painted method is inferior and will wear very rapidly.

Are you saying that cerakote on the inside of the slide will stand up to heat, oil, and physical contact with the barrel lugs/hood?

Not many pros actually posted in that thread. Also, when the pros post their work on here, notice how many of them use cerakote? Almost all of them do.
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Old 12-06-2015, 02:44 PM
Steve in Allentown Steve in Allentown is offline
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Hey Dave. Thanks for the reply. You guys do great work.

Jamie, the cerakote jobs done by the pros here are works of art. I think the reasons the pros do cerakote include the fact that it's, as Dave points out, much less expensive, doesn't require full bio-hazard suits to work with, and is more durable than bluing.

For me personally, I prefer the more durable finishes like ionbond, NP3, and melonite so I won't have to worry about refinishing stuff. I suppose I look at as saving time and money in the long run. I think the cost of two cerakote jobs might equal the cost of on ionbond job.
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Old 12-06-2015, 03:50 PM
jamiesaun jamiesaun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve in Allentown View Post
Hey Dave. Thanks for the reply. You guys do great work.

Jamie, the cerakote jobs done by the pros here are works of art. I think the reasons the pros do cerakote include the fact that it's, as Dave points out, much less expensive, doesn't require full bio-hazard suits to work with, and is more durable than bluing.

For me personally, I prefer the more durable finishes like ionbond, NP3, and melonite so I won't have to worry about refinishing stuff. I suppose I look at as saving time and money in the long run. I think the cost of two cerakote jobs might equal the cost of on ionbond job.

I agree. Just stating that the particular thread in question was full of opinions from people who haven't actually used it before, that much was obvious.
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Old 12-06-2015, 04:12 PM
1saxman 1saxman is online now
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All I've ever used are Brownell's oven-bake lacquers and 'Teflon/Moly' and Alumahyde II air-dry (mainly on parts that can't be heat cured). Durability is good without media blasting. All I've ever done is to work the part over with a wire brush as far as surface prep. Surface cleaning and degreasing is more important and is where most users go wrong. Clean and degrease using the most aggressive solvents/detergents you can think of, then bake the part at 300 F - grease will still cook out of the metal pores. Do this at least twice. Remember to only use the paint during clear, dry, temperate weather with low humidity. Let the paint can warm up in the sun at least an hour. Pre heat the parts to be coated. Only now are you ready to spray.
The uncured paint is fragile. Think ahead and make sure you have racks for baking that won't leave marks. Make sure you have jigs for holding parts so you can fully cover them. Follow the baking directions, but I do a little different; I start with a cold oven (at least not over 150) so I can take my time to position things. Then I turn it on. When it cuts off the first time I start the countdown. When the prescribed baking time is reached, I turn the oven off but do not open the door. I let it cool down gradually, maybe another hour. One of the great things about the coatings is, you can touch up and re-bake without hurting anything. And if you really make a mess, you fix it before baking when it's easy to sand or remove with thinner. Here are some things I've done with various colors. My two favorites are 'Dark Parkerizing' and 'Matte Black'. BTW, there is no operational downside to using bake-ons. They cure out very thin - you will see every scratch and pit that was on the metal.





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