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  #1  
Old 05-24-2020, 06:38 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Lockdown boredom story #238: more parts swapping

I just wanted to share the latest incarnation of my O1911C Classic. I've been trying to give it a custom look without losing the basic OEM Colt appearance. Also I wanted a little mix of vintage and current. I think I'm pretty much there:



The stainless barrel sticking out the blued slide was bugging me, so I decided to embellish it with a stainless Wilson bushing I had on hand. It also fits a little more snugly than the original so it might improve accuracy, not that there was anything wrong in that department to begin with.



The back end however received a makeover, with a GI thumb safety, 1950s checkered Colt hammer and a steel Colt flat mainspring housing. The pistol is also wearing 3-dot sights now. I replaced the rear with an OEM Colt unit and carefully drilled the front post. I do wish the mainspring housing had a lanyard loop, but nobody to my knowledge offers a serrated one with that feature.



The trigger currently is a long Colt polymer trigger, but I have a Harrison medium-length trigger in black on order. The grips are just a simulated ivory polymer with an embossed dragon reflecting my interest in Chinese culture and history.



Anyway, nothing super-fancy but maybe it might give others some ideas if they're trying to come up with something similar.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.

Last edited by dsk; 05-24-2020 at 10:25 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-24-2020, 07:09 PM
fnfalman fnfalman is offline
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I dig the grip.

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  #3  
Old 05-24-2020, 07:44 PM
Whit Whit is offline
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Your slight makeover looks good dsk. However, just based on other threads in which you have posted, I must admit surprise that you did not install an arched mainspring housing. Ivory, even faux ivory, just belongs on a Government Model or Commander, at least that is my worthless opinion. Good luck with making it fit your tastes.
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  #4  
Old 05-24-2020, 08:01 PM
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I did have an arched housing on it at first. Problem is, while I prefer the looks of the short trigger/arched housing of the M1911A1, I shoot better with a slightly longer trigger and a flat housing. I've been switching back and forth on this pistol for the past few months, and hope with the Harrison trigger I'll be in just the right comfort zone to finally stop.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #5  
Old 05-25-2020, 02:17 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is offline
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No recent parts changing except for grips/stocks, but a lot of mine are getting cleaned and even detail stripped. Springs changed when they probably don't NEED to be changed, etc.
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  #6  
Old 05-25-2020, 05:02 PM
Captain H Captain H is offline
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dsk,

Although it is arched and not flat, Auto Ordnance sells a serrated arched MSH with lanyard loop. It isnt two peice like the original USGI one, but still a dead ringer for the real deal in looks. You can order straight from them.

Looks nice BTW
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  #7  
Old 05-25-2020, 05:34 PM
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I know that arched housings can commonly be found with the lanyard loop, as can flat housings that are either smooth or checkered. But nobody makes a serrated flat one w/loop, dag nabbit.

On the other hand, the OEM steel Colt housing fits like it belongs there, unlike a Les Baer unit I have which doesn't match the frame contours perfectly. I believe Midway still has them available on their website as of this writing.

And by the way... this morning I already undertook Lockdown Boredom Project #239. I swapped around a bunch of parts on my ARs and set them all up differently. I had already been contemplating doing it for awhile, but since it's pouring rain outside I figured today was a good day to finally do it. And if this lockdown continues much longer project #240 might be to completely refinish the wood on my Uberti lever actions.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.

Last edited by dsk; 05-25-2020 at 06:50 PM.
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  #8  
Old 05-27-2020, 04:25 PM
Sandhills Write Sandhills Write is offline
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Strange, I have been contemplating refinishing one of my Uberti lever guns too, lol, but we are not on a tight lockdown here.
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  #9  
Old 05-27-2020, 04:39 PM
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The shiny red stocks on Ubertis drive me nuts, as they're not authentic. A year or two ago I removed the grips on my Cimarron SAA and refinished them, and they look a whole lot better now.

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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #10  
Old 05-27-2020, 05:29 PM
Scott Wilson Scott Wilson is offline
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Those look nice. The Italians sure do have access to some nice walnut.
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  #11  
Old 05-29-2020, 12:43 PM
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The Harrison trigger arrived yesterday, and I fitted it to the pistol with minimal effort. Unfortunately I decided that I like the feel of the polymer Colt trigger better, as it's actually slightly shorter (despite the Harrison being a medium-length) and there's more curvature to the trigger face. I may end up using the Harrison trigger in another project pistol instead. I test-fit it to that frame but it actually needs additional fitting, so I'd deal with that later when I'm ready to take on Boredom Project #240.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #12  
Old 05-29-2020, 02:14 PM
summerhelp summerhelp is offline
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I thought boredom project #240 was redoing the wood on the lever actions.
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  #13  
Old 05-29-2020, 02:18 PM
summerhelp summerhelp is offline
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How did you refinish the grips on the SAA?
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Old 05-29-2020, 02:21 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Whoops, you're right. But the pistol project will likely be assigned #240 anyway since refinishing the lever actions will take longer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by summerhelp View Post
How did you refinish the grips on the SAA?
Took the old finish right off with some Jasco, then applied some Minwax gunstock stain and rubbed Bichwood Casey Tru-Oil over it. The base wood Uberti uses is very plain and colorless so it needed the stain to make it richer.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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Old 05-29-2020, 05:19 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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I have something that should keep me going for a while.

I bought an all original 1887 Winchester High Wall rifle a couple of weeks ago. It is chambered in 40-70 Straight Sharps. I have a box of ammo coming for it this week. But at five bucks a round., I am going to have to get to where I can load my own ammo for it.

Getting set up to do this is going to be a bit of a trick, black powder and all. But we are looking forward to it.

I do not see myself doing much in the way of parts swapping though.
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  #16  
Old 05-29-2020, 05:58 PM
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$5.00 a round?!? Holy smokes! Twenty shots and there goes my ammo budget for the month. One good thing about it though, is that it really encourages you to take good shots so you don't miss.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #17  
Old 05-29-2020, 10:24 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Holy smokes is right!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
$5.00 a round?!? Holy smokes! Twenty shots and there goes my ammo budget for the month. One good thing about it though, is that it really encourages you to take good shots so you don't miss.
Although much more eloquent than what my reaction was, printable as well. And here I have been wondering about the guys that shoot .50 BMG.

The plan is to get to where I can load my own. But I have to start somewhere. The twenty rounds that I have coming will theoretically have properly sized brass for the round. Which is about as scarce as hens teeth to begin with. From there I can make certain checks to figure out the correct bullet, powder charge, etc. To hopefully get to the point where I can load my own rounds at an acceptable cost. Part of the reason that I am willing to pay this much for this ammo is to actually procure that brass.

There will be a number of considerations that will have to be taken into account going forward from there. Accumulation of additional brass, proper bullets, powder, etc. Loading dies will likely have to be custom, at least with a special order expander die.

No doubt this will be a learning experience looking ahead. But I am looking forward to this. There is a small but active community of fanciers of these vintage guns. The people that I have been in touch with are pretty supportive.

We will of course see.
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  #18  
Old 05-29-2020, 11:21 PM
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I got out of reloading 20 years ago when bulk range ammo appeared on the scene and was almost as cheap as rolling my own. Of course that was when 9mm and .45ACP were my two most-fired calibers. I'm now getting into a lot of older calibers more (like .45 Colt) that are way too expensive to buy new. It's a bummer that I literally gave away all my reloading gear many years ago instead of just storing it somewhere, but at least it gives me something to start investing in once again. Yeah... project #242.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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