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  #1  
Old 05-17-2020, 03:22 AM
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Grease vs oil

When/why would you use a grease like Tetra on your weapon vs a traditional gun oil like Rem oil? Is there a specific instance where a grease would be better than oil...or is it just a chocolate/vanilla thing?

Also, is Brian Eno's "Slide Glide" considered a grease, or is it something else entirely?
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  #2  
Old 05-17-2020, 03:58 AM
steveno steveno is offline
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years ago I tried some grease from a well known 1911 maker on my Kimber SST Compact. at 30 degrees temp I might as well used peanut butter as it really gummed things up. I guess it doesn't get that cold in the south. there was nothing to indicate on the tube about a temp range. I use nothing but Birchwood Casey gun oil

Last edited by steveno; 05-17-2020 at 05:20 AM.
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Old 05-17-2020, 04:20 AM
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Great simple question with endless answers. Many will preach brands, methods and mfg marketing agenda. In most cases the lube feature is the primary focus. While this is important other qualities of the product can be important and/or useful. If you seek industries definition they site grease as having bonding agents to add to the viscosity which is temperature based. This technical stuff is important to heavy geared equipment. Our guns don’t fall into the need for heavy grease at extended high temperatures and friction loads. The lube you use will dissipate or dry in time depending on conditions. Having said that I’ll share my thoughts. Gun grease (I use Lucas Red “N” Tacky and Lubriplate 130-A) is great for assembling stuff that likes to hide, slip, drop, spring away, or otherwise move. I like the red because I can see where it is or is not. No other reason. Any thick grease will work. I like the Lubriplate on springs because it goes on great with a toothpick and it is known as a builders lubricant/preserving agent. I use high temp moly on my slide tracks because it continues to provide friction protection even when it appears to not be there. We use it on high speed rotating splines on jet engine accessories. A thimble full will do 25 guns. The tacky red grease will hold those series 80 safety levers in place for reassembly and HELP reassemble those infamous Gold Cup Jesus springs and associated tiny parts. The more guns (and other stuff) you take apart, the more times you will find use for grease. In most places/cases the endless general oil products will lube but will not protect your gun forever. I select those by user friendly containers/applicators. In most cases, the closest one is what I grab. It’s really that unimportant. I buy Lucas gun oil in 5 gallon containers for the ultrasonic. I have a larger multi vat model and the price was good. That gun you cleaned and lubed last year still needs periodic inspection. Rust happens. For long term storage....well that’s another story and game.

Last edited by STORM2; 05-17-2020 at 04:29 AM.
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  #4  
Old 05-17-2020, 04:52 AM
Totally Tactical Totally Tactical is offline
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Some people like grease of slide rails.
But over the last 30 years I have seen grease slow slides down enough to cause the gun to become unreliable.
The only places I use grease on a 1911 is a toothpick tip amount on the hammer hooks and on the top plunger in the mainspring housing.
( The part were the hammer strut contacts)
I use a light White grease.

With that said oils like Rem oil, while a good oil is thin.
I like Rem oil for lubing the trigger assembly of a remington 870, or a ruger mark 2.
Small intricate parts.

My go to lube is Breakfree CLP and LP.
The CLP I use for cleaning and the LP for the moving parts.
If you can't find the LP, then the CLP is fine.
Lp is a hair thicker because it doesn't have a cleaner.

I have used it for many years
It doesn't gum up or burn off
the company isn't going to stop making it acouple of years from now
I can find it anywhere Midway, Brownells, Amazon, even Walmart.

There are alot of other good oils out there, pick one and use it.

Last edited by Totally Tactical; 05-17-2020 at 04:55 AM.
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  #5  
Old 05-17-2020, 04:58 AM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is online now
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I use grease on my garage door rollers and lawnmower, snowblower, , , ball joints and tie rod ends (if serviceable). As far as firearms go, I use Wilson oil. I used Tetra 5 years ago and when the gun got warm, it was like butter melting on an hot ear of corn. The tube is still in my cleaning bag (somewhere?).
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  #6  
Old 05-17-2020, 05:25 AM
combat auto combat auto is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flight Medic View Post
When/why would you use a grease like Tetra on your weapon vs a traditional gun oil like Rem oil? Is there a specific instance where a grease would be better than oil...or is it just a chocolate/vanilla thing?

Also, is Brian Eno's "Slide Glide" considered a grease, or is it something else entirely?
You are asking the "unsolvable" riddle of all time ;-)...But simple answer is shooters-choice (anyone pushing an "always or never" POV is living in Dogma-Country). Do what works for you.

The key is to find a balance btwn penetration of the lube and the ability to stay in place...To wit:

1) On most guns I use WC Oil (the regular oil, not lite or heavy they also offer), it meets both requirements above very nicely.

2) On some of my plastic fantastic which I use for HD I use grease, the white stuff. I don't want to spend much time maintaining these guns and the grease stays in place (albeit dried out a little) for a year easily. I only clean these 1/year.

3) As far as Slide Guide, it is an awesome product. I use it on my Infinity because that is what they recommended when I got the gun. The infinity is the tightest fitting "1911/2011" I own by far, so enter the Myth Busters concerning wives tale about not using grease on a tight custom 1911/2011...And to be clear, living in NJ, I use the Slide-Glide-"lite". Down south maybe the regular works better...

So if Slide Guide is so great why not use it on all my guns? Simple answer, I would, except it STINKS, that is smells, and it is strong, for quite some time after applying - like many weeks if not months. Nothing is perfect .
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Last edited by combat auto; 05-17-2020 at 05:31 AM.
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  #7  
Old 05-17-2020, 06:25 AM
Colt Carson Colt Carson is offline
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I believe the Wilson Combat oils are a great product line, that arrive in a very practical bottle. I use their universal oil, some call it liquid grease, on anything that slides. I use the middle weight oil on everything else. The heavier oil is good at staying put, while the lighter oil is great at creeping along pins and such. I don’t use their lightest oil, but then I don’t go to the range in cold temperatures. I have no use for Rem Oil.

Last edited by Colt Carson; 05-17-2020 at 06:35 AM.
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Old 05-17-2020, 06:53 AM
M-Peltier M-Peltier is offline
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I've tried many different products over the years for firearm lubrication. The two I have settled on and have used for the last 10-15 yrs on everything is Mobil one synthetic oil and TW25B Synthetic grease. I typically use a dab of grease on hammer hooks when doing a thorough cleaning, sometimes a dab on slide rails. any other lube needs gets the oil. At the range during competition if things get a bit dry and dusty, a few drops of oil from a syringe type oiler I keep in my range bag is all I need. I don't use the Mobil 1 because I feel it's any better than anything else. Literally every gun oil I have tried does a fairly good job, as long as it's not too thin. The Mobil 1 is just a byproduct of doing oil changes and is basically free, I just fill a bottle with the last few drops from the bottles of fresh oil at oil change time.
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  #9  
Old 05-17-2020, 06:53 AM
jhat jhat is offline
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Rem Oil is a terrible lubricant. Too thin! Try Weaponshield.

Last edited by jhat; 05-17-2020 at 07:13 AM.
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  #10  
Old 05-17-2020, 07:18 AM
Zerodefect Zerodefect is offline
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Rem oil sucks. Tetra is no big deal.

I make my own lubes. I avoid solvents as often as possible.
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  #11  
Old 05-17-2020, 07:22 AM
bp52 bp52 is offline
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weapon shield is good stuff
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:48 AM
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I use something a bit different, I use chainsaw, chain oil. It stays put and doesn’t run when hot, plus cold weather doesn’t seem to thicken it enough to impede slide movement although on the next really cold day here in nw Indiana I want to leave one of my guns in the trunk overnight to verify but so far it has worked very well.

If you take the chain bar oil with a drop between your fingers it will string out and is the same kind of oil that we used for slideways when I was building machine tools. Just works well, thick enough to really smooth Things out, stays in place.

Of course my alternative is 10w-40 or 15w-50 (preferred) Mobil 1 ,,, really doesn’t seem to care about temps, but the chain oil seems to work better. Gun specific oils or grease in my opinion is just a reason to charge more. Some good, some not so good.

In my experience all the different greases I that I’ve tried tend to impede slide movement when cold, not allowing the gun to work. My .02

Last edited by passx; 05-17-2020 at 07:54 AM.
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  #13  
Old 05-17-2020, 07:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flight Medic View Post
...or is it just a chocolate/vanilla thing?
I generally think it is. You can use anything you want, as long as you use it, and it works for you.

The Wilson lubes have been mentioned, and they are a good product. They have a use recommendation on their page that may be helpful.

https://shopwilsoncombat.com/Ultima-...tinfo/577%2D4/
Quote:
Ultima-Lube II Lite Oil - Very low viscosity. Ideal for extreme cold weather use. Recommended Uses: Tightly fitted handguns of minor caliber.

Ultima-Lube II Oil - Thin viscosity penetrates hard to get to areas. Ideal for cold weather use, 10° to 350° F temperature range. Recommended Uses: Tightly fitted handguns of all types.

Ultima-Lube II Universal - All purpose lube for all types of firearms. Stays put under extreme conditions, 40° to 350° F temperature range. Recommended Uses: Service pistols/revolvers and broken-in custom handguns, Long guns of all action types, AR style rifles in the 20° to 50° F temperature range.

Ultima-Lube II Grease - Ideal for heavy wear areas. Stays put under extreme conditions, 40° to 350° F temperature range. Recommended Uses: Full and Semi-Auto rifles and carbines, Optimal in AR style rifles at temperatures above 50° F.
Note they only recommend their grease, and their grease is a pourable grease, for "Full and semi-auto rifles and carbines", they don't recommend it for pistols.

On a sunny, 85 degree day, shooting a Springfield Mil-Spec in .45 Auto, you could probably use anything you want, including the thickest grease. On the other hand, on a 15 degree day, shooting a brand new Les Baer in 9mm, you may have some problems with grease.

Edit to add: I find it easier to clean my guns after using oil rather than when I use grease. However, both have functioned well while shooting.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:16 AM
RodII RodII is offline
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There is no one rule for gun lubes, and no way to prove one way or another. All you will get are people's opinion, so here is mine. I use a small dab of red wheel bearing grease on my 1911 rails and barrel feet. As to oil I use air tool oil, I bought it for my nail gun and other air tools. I tried it first on a Browning Buckmark and it seemed to last longer, it is not thick but does adhere very well. When shooting I still put a drop on the rails and the oil mixes with the grease, you get a bit of both.
I have not had a problem in cold weather, but I do not get out unless I have too in very cold weather. If I go to the range it has to be in the 40ths and not overcast and windy. If I had to be out in very cold conditions I would most likely leave off the grease.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:24 AM
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I used to have an Explorer, now I have a Yukon. They both carry my 1911s to and from the range. The guns didn’t/don’t know the difference.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:26 AM
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i used to have an explorer, now i have a yukon. They both carry my 1911s to and from the range. The guns didn’t/don’t know the difference.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:35 AM
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Some greases are thixotropic. On a slide rail, for example, the grease has it's "normal" viscosity 'till the two pieces begin moving against each other. This is called "shear". When it's undergoing shear, a thixotropic grease will lose viscosity (becomes "thinner") so as to not interfere with machinery operation, and then return to "normal" viscosity at rest. So the grease "stays put" but won't interfere with, in this case, proper slide velocity.

I use Super Lube grease on slide rails. There are probably lots of other thixotropic greases out there but I've had no need to look further.

https://www.amazon.com/Super-Lube-41...FME/ref=sr_1_1
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:38 AM
Old Fart Old Fart is offline
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I always heard, if it turns, oil it, if it slides, grease it. I don't suppose that was intended specifically for firearms, but greasing the roller groove, carrier, and op rod is recommended on the M14 (M1A) rifle, and I do it on the slides of my 1911's; just a hair line of 130-A Lubriplate in the rail grooves. No chance of it gumming up the works, it gets cleaned off and replaced after every outing to the range or whenever the gun is fired, same as the minute amounts of oil used.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:08 AM
hardluk1 hardluk1 is offline
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I've used automotive amsoil synthetic oil and grease for general firearm lube needs since the late '70's . 10w30 on slide rails , grease on the lug / locking area and barrel wear area's . Very light coats is all that's needed . I have used the same grease on bolt action rifles lugs in -10* weather with no issues Places every new pistol I get after cleaning and lubing in the freezer to -1* , walk them out side and fire a mag full of standard pressure ammo . G-96 as wipe down cleaner lube and kept in the range bag and hunting pack .
If I lived in a cold climate year round then I would change the oil to a 0w-20 amsoil maybe .

I use the same oil in our car , truck , mowers and generator so just draining the bottles well gets all the oil needed same for the grease , grease the tractor and movers and pump a little in my gun use container .
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:29 AM
Sergio Natali Sergio Natali is offline
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I don't think lubricating a gun is a particularly difficult duty for a lubricant, in particular if one cleans and relubes frequently, one can’t over clean a gun, I always clean a gun every time I shoot it.
I use Ballistol as a bore cleaner, with a brass brush, many clean patches and a lot of elbow grease...
On everywhere else I first use some WD40 then BALLISTOL and wipe properly with clean cloths.
I apply a small bit of TETRA Gun Grease on the rails and outside of the barrels. In very cold weather I replace the grease with some drops of MOBIL 1.
All my firearms are thoroughly cleaned after each use to as new as possible, and never had a single issue in 40 + years.
Just my long-winded two cents
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:31 AM
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A light viscosity, thin full synthetic grease on the rails of well used pistols during the warm weather months works nicely. New and/or tight guns may short stroke with grease or may tend to stumble in colder weather, though.

For me, grease (thin full synthetic) is reserved for aluminum frames and the high mileage guns. If you decide to use grease, I would recommend a thin 100% synthetic only...and you must clean often. Oil helps float away debris, but grease can trap it. Clean and reapply. Grease works very well if you find an appropriate product and use it properly.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:43 AM
JMJ1015 JMJ1015 is offline
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I have tried a lot of different oils & greases. Now I just use Mobil 1 synthetic oil.

The Shooters Choice grease that was mentioned is good stuff but should be used sparingly. The only time I ever had a malfunction in an old Ruger P-series pistol was after using it. I put too much of it on the slide rails. The next time I shot I had a FTE. After clearing the jam I looked down into the pistol with the slide locked back. The grease had migrated through the pistol & was all over everything inside. The extractor had literally slipped off the cartridge casing. It is possible to over lubricate.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:51 AM
Bowdrie Bowdrie is offline
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Have used Mobil I for many years, no problems ever, and it's cheap per unit quantity.
Lots of it, and more. But not quite as much as these guys use.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9bOT_d60LM
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:58 AM
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Funny how everybody says they're tired of lube threads, yet this one has 24 replies in just six hours.

I use Break-Free simply because I've been using it for 40 years and have never had an issue. No matter what oil you use, eventually it'll evaporate or drain out and need a re-application.
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:16 AM
Snapping Twig Snapping Twig is offline
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Generally accepted mechanical reference:

If it slides - grease it.

If it spins or rotates - oil it.

Exceptions of course, but as a general principle, you can't go wrong.
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