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  #1  
Old 01-04-2020, 12:10 PM
Combat Weapon Sys Combat Weapon Sys is offline
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Nitre Bluing (photos)

I have been doing some Nitre Bluing recently for several different builds. Thought I would share a few photos.
Attached Thumbnails
Nitre Mainspring.JPG   Nitre Mainspring 2.JPG   Nitre Novak.JPG   Nitre Recoil Plug.JPG   Nitre Remington 870 Bolt.JPG  
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Old 01-04-2020, 12:17 PM
Combat Weapon Sys Combat Weapon Sys is offline
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Thumb Safety
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Nitre Thumb Safety.JPG   Nitre BLue Kart2.jpg  
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Last edited by Combat Weapon Sys; 01-04-2020 at 02:48 PM.
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  #3  
Old 01-04-2020, 12:18 PM
DWARREN123 DWARREN123 is offline
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Nice looking finish!
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Old 01-04-2020, 07:45 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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I love this. The early Government Models with the polished Carbona blue with fire-blue parts were some of the best-looking pistols of all time.
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Old 01-04-2020, 11:44 PM
drail drail is offline
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In the words of B.B. King - "How blue can you get? " That 870 bolt sure looks good. Very nice.
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Old 01-05-2020, 06:31 AM
DesmoAndrew DesmoAndrew is offline
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Care to share your method? You look to have achieved pretty good uniformity which can be a challenge sometimes with flame based process. I've seem a fellow on youtube who built a "bluing bed" to spread heat our uniformly. Wondered if you did the same?
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Old 01-05-2020, 02:52 PM
Combat Weapon Sys Combat Weapon Sys is offline
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It's not flame based. The process works just like hot bluing but with much higher temperatures.

650F- 750F.
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Old 01-05-2020, 02:59 PM
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Any issues with altering heat treat with those temps?
I've heard some say it's not a problem at all, while others claim those temps destroy the part.

I tried to blue some parts with the "boiling hot stump-killer method", but I couldn't get the temps high enough to consistently color anything but small, thin parts.
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Old 01-05-2020, 07:14 PM
pat_jones pat_jones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Combat Weapon Sys View Post
It's not flame based. The process works just like hot bluing but with much higher temperatures.

650F- 750F.
The oxide layer is significantly thinner with a heat blue. I would be concerned about getting barrels that hot as that is enough heat to change the temper.

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  #10  
Old 01-05-2020, 09:21 PM
Combat Weapon Sys Combat Weapon Sys is offline
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No I have not seen any change in the heat treatment of the parts. Unlike a hot bluing bath where the parts are submerged for minutes at a time. Nitre Bluing the parts are only exposed to that temperature for a few seconds. I have seen barrels heated to much higher temperatures using torches to burn out Loctite and remove stuck compensators. While I wouldnt advise exposing the parts of your gun to such high temperatures for an extended amount of time as it could eventually damage the heat treat and cause the part to wear faster etc. I read about Bar-Sto doing tests on their barrels 10+years ago heating them to cherry red and then checking the barrels for any damage. They did not find any change or damage to the barrel when exposed to high temperatures for a short period of time. A nitre Bluing bath can be used to temper steel. The steel would be exposed to those temperature for much longer times then it takes for the bluing process. A nitre bath does not have to run at the high end of the temperature range 650F to blue parts. The temperature will change depending on the color you are trying to achieve. And the higher the temperature the faster the color change will take place.
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Old 01-06-2020, 12:35 AM
partsproduction partsproduction is offline
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You may be right. I made a flat spring out of 5160 spring steel and got it too hard for the switchblade knife I was working on. I tried to draw the temper down several times by sequentially raising the draw temperature and letting it cool slowly, after succesively higher temperatures up past 600F I finally gave up.
Testing was done using a Rockwell tester though, and if I didn't have one I'd never do that to a gun of mine and shoot it without knowing the hardness before and after those temps.
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Old 02-01-2020, 10:28 PM
Combat Weapon Sys Combat Weapon Sys is offline
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Was finally able to get a couple photos that shows the deep blue color of the parts. The other photos washed out for some reason.
Attached Thumbnails
Wide Spur Ebay Nitre.jpg   slide stop nitre ebay.JPG  
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  #13  
Old 02-03-2020, 08:21 AM
ndnchf ndnchf is offline
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Wow - that is beautiful! Cant wait to see the completed pistol!
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  #14  
Old 02-03-2020, 12:55 PM
DarkLord DarkLord is offline
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Niter bluing is SUPER easy, but you cannot let oxygen get to your parts after they're polished. It will show every molecule of oxygen you allow to settle on your part.

Polish, drop in oil, then polish the next part. When you have a bunch of parts in oil, degrease, and immediately drop into the solution. Then it's just a matter of heat/time and the color you desire.

It's one of the best looking bluing processes, but it doesn't wear well.

Last edited by DarkLord; 02-03-2020 at 03:03 PM.
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2020, 06:23 PM
dragonsbreath dragonsbreath is offline
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Is that the nitride bluing salts from Brownells or just heating with a torch to desired color and putting in oil?
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