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  #1  
Old 01-16-2014, 07:34 AM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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Sometimes "disaster" is small and localized



Came across this accident this morning. It happened right in front of me. I was off-duty, but first-responder never the less.

I set my vehicle across the lanes of traffic to block oncoming vehicles. I set my Fenix TK-41 on variable strobe, and set it on the roof of my truck, pointed back at oncoming traffic.

I ran to the vehicle calling 911 on the way, but couldn't open the door. I used an old CRKT T-Hawk with a nice impact tip to shatter the window. The lady inside was still strapped in her seatbelt upside down, but had slid halfway out of the belt. I couldn't reach the belt release. I used my Strider SMF to cut the seat belt. I pulled the lady out with help from a couple more bystanders.

Long story, short - she was fine. Ambulance arrived within minutes and took her to the hospital for check up.

Sometimes, a disaster can be on a very small scale - but the moral is to always be prepared. Not for EOTW, or zombies, or thermo-nuclear devastation - but for the little unexpected things that can go wrong TODAY, right in front of you.

Folks, make sure your cell phones are always charged before heading out. Keep a good knife, hatchet/glass breaking tool, and flashlight with good batteries in your vehicle ALWAYS. Sometimes disaster may happen right in front of you.




Last edited by shane45-1911; 01-16-2014 at 04:35 PM. Reason: spellin'
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  #2  
Old 01-16-2014, 08:19 AM
Raylan Givens Raylan Givens is offline
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You're right. The percentages are much higher for encountering this situation as opposed to red legs in your back yard. I have happened upon many incidents just like this one. The number one thing you can do as a first responder, professionally or privately, is to see the big picture and not get tunnel vision.

Glad I don't have to deal with snow and ice but on a rare occasion.
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  #3  
Old 01-16-2014, 08:54 AM
Pedro 1 Pedro 1 is online now
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Nice job Shane. I bet the lady was grateful for you being there.
Respects, Pedro.
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  #4  
Old 01-16-2014, 09:01 AM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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Thank you. She was shaken and stirred, but once I confirmed she had no apparent neck or spine injuries, we hauled her out of there as quickly as possible.

She was indeed grateful, and through her sobbing, all I kept hearing is - "My husband's gonna kill me". I told her not to worry - I gave her my badge# and contact card, and told her to call me and let me know how she's doing. And then jokingly told her "no one's doing any killing on my watch." She laughed and squeezed my hand and gave me a very sincere "thank you". Made my day actually, all things considered.



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  #5  
Old 01-16-2014, 09:29 AM
CavCop CavCop is offline
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Its always good to be ready for a wreck/emergency. Be it a flipped van, motorcyle, bus on fire, even a shooting.

I travel a nasty streach of Hwy and run up on things often. For a while I had emergency stobe light front and rear. Heck I may go back to that. A few times I had to jump out of the way of another wreck. A few year back in Dec (24-26) a guy I knew as a soldier, and who was an officer where I lived and lived where I am an officer, stopped to help a broken down vehicle, he was hit and killed. Always be alert of your surounding.
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  #6  
Old 01-16-2014, 12:18 PM
Amos Iron Wolf Amos Iron Wolf is online now
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Well done, Shane. It's those little things like the lady's sincere thank you that can really make your day.

Had a guy from Austin, TX, on a motorcycle forum say how he always had his cell phone on him and had roadside assistance didn't need any tools or other stuff with him. I reminded him that you don't have to go that far into the Texas Hill Country to find places your phone won't work. It just didn't seem to click with him though. He pretty much figures he's covered wherever he goes.

Around Del Rio, you get out of town and it's easier to find yourself in places that are far from anywhere and don't have phone service than it is to find places that do. You make darned sure you know exactly what kind of fuel mileage your bike gets and where the nearest fuel stops are. You also have at least a few basic items on you. Since it can be 100+ F outside a lot in the summer here you best be thinking about having water or Gatorade in your bag. Even if you can call someone, sitting with no shade in that kind of heat for the hour or so it takes for them to get to you can be a drainer. You certainly aren't going to use the bike for shade with a just shut off engine pumping heat at you.

That so many people go around without even a minimal cutting edge on them is baffling to me. Something as simple as a SAK Classic or a Peanut type knife can be be the difference between being trapped or not.

You don't have to go around with bug out bags and every gadget known to the marketers, but you should have at least a cutting device and a few things on you.

It's all those little "moments" that are what the Boy Scout's "Be Prepared," and the U.S. Coast Guard's, "Always Prepared." mottos really apply to.

Good reminder.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:13 PM
1toughdog 1toughdog is offline
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Nice work sir! Prepared with a few simple, packable tools is common sense but often overlooked. Great post, thanks!
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  #8  
Old 01-16-2014, 10:04 PM
kimberette kimberette is offline
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Well done Shane! Good post and reminder.

Lots of good info from everyone. I definitely need to put a few extra things in my vehicle for just in case.
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  #9  
Old 01-16-2014, 10:33 PM
stitcher stitcher is offline
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Thanks for sharing, that's a great reminder...
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  #10  
Old 01-16-2014, 10:47 PM
NonHyphenAmerican NonHyphenAmerican is offline
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Shane,
I like neighbors like you.

I try to be neighborly like you.
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  #11  
Old 01-17-2014, 11:10 AM
wildfire45 wildfire45 is offline
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glad it worked out ok.

the last one i dealt with was a 2 car head on in the middle of a busy intersection, multiple head traumas and one severe compound leg fracture on a young boy, oh and noone in the worse off car spoke english... luckily no vehicle fire involved. scene safety and triage became my priorities until a cop showed up and took over traffic control. i continued triage and trying to keep everyone calm until FD got on scene with extrication tools, just so happened it was my uncle on the rescue, we were both busy enough we didn't realize we were both on scene until it was basically over. no way i was moving anyone without neck braces due to the lack of fire.

good points on prepared mindset and in-vehicle rescue tools.
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  #12  
Old 02-17-2014, 06:20 PM
grubbylabs grubbylabs is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CavCop View Post
stopped to help a broken down vehicle, he was hit and killed. Always be alert of your surounding.
I know its hard not to stop especially when you know what to do. But think about what that man's family went though.

I don't know what the current numbers are but when I was working as an EMT about 80% of EMS fatalities while on the job were from on coming traffic. If they can't see an ambulance or a fire engine, they won't be able to see you or your car. And think about your wife and kids or other loved ones sitting in that car when it gets hit by on coming traffic.

I know its hard not to stop, but think about it.
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Old 03-08-2014, 11:07 PM
lurch6889 lurch6889 is offline
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Cell Phone

Another word on the cell phone issue for the small disasters in life, always keep your cell phone in something while driving your pocket center console of the car something that isn't going to move in case of an accident.
I say this because in August i was driving my tow truck home from a long call at about 11:30 at night. The route i chose to take home was a fairly deserted road that time of night. Well for still unknown reasons i ended up going off the road behind a guard rail down in a canyon and rolled the truck even farther down a hill and i got ejected from the truck. (before anyone asks no i wasn't wearing a seat belt, I realize I am an idiot for this but in hindsight wearing a seat belt probably would have killed me in this particular accident.) Well while driving I always would set my phone on my leg so i could have quick access to it when receiving my next call. (Again stupid because my freaking work shirts had breast pockets but hey hindsight is 20/20) Well after I hit the dirt I knew i had to find my phone to call for help because i was no where nearly in sight of the road. But i couldn't find it, I found my GPS, I found my Ruger LCR that had been in an ankle holster that had been torn off my leg, (that action is probably what broke my pelvis) but I couldn't find my phone. Lucky for me there was a car about a mile behind me that didn't see the accident but saw all the dust and pulled over to call 911. If that car hadn't stopped I possibly would have been out there till my wife got worried and started looking for me. and its even iffy if she would have seen down far enough to find me. It turns out my phone was later found directly underneath the truck. so it would have taken awhile for me to find it, if left to my own.
So if you ever end up in a serious accident knowing where your phone is extremely important.

P.S. IF you are wondering I got out of the accident fairly good, broken left pelvis, fractured right clavicle, broken tail bone, busted my face all open, had both lungs slowly collapse (2 chest tubes and 8 days in the hospital for that one) and later found out i herniated a disk in my back, and messed up my right rotator cuff (I guess whatever i grabbed a hold of with my left hand i didn't want to let go of) I'm still off work on Workmens Comp and just went through shoulder surgery 2 weeks ago but i should make a full recovery.
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  #14  
Old 03-09-2014, 06:37 AM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lurch6889 View Post
P.S. IF you are wondering I got out of the accident fairly good, broken left pelvis, fractured right clavicle, broken tail bone, busted my face all open, had both lungs slowly collapse (2 chest tubes and 8 days in the hospital for that one) and later found out i herniated a disk in my back, and messed up my right rotator cuff (I guess whatever i grabbed a hold of with my left hand i didn't want to let go of) I'm still off work on Workmens Comp and just went through shoulder surgery 2 weeks ago but i should make a full recovery.
Yikes!!! I'm glad you are going to be OK.

Thanks for bringing up a good point about the cell phone. You are absolutely right. Even in a small impact, you'd be surprised where things end up inside a car. No sense having a phone if you can't get to it, or find it, when you need it most.



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  #15  
Old 03-09-2014, 11:10 AM
jdinid jdinid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shane45-1911 View Post
Thank you. She was shaken and stirred, but once I confirmed she had no apparent neck or spine injuries, we hauled her out of there as quickly as possible.
Thanks for adding that. It was the first thought that came to mind when I read you had extricated her.

Nicely done.
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