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  #1  
Old 12-26-2013, 10:42 AM
Fastball Fastball is offline
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First Aid/Med Kit

I'm putting together a SHTF bag for in my car. I travel out of state 40 miles, 1-way to & from work and have a nice little collection of things for in it so far. A small one in my wife's car is also in the works.

I am wondering if I'm better off building my own first aid/med kit or is there a kit some may feel is a good all-a-rounder out there for sale. I have been Googling and reading until my eyes are seeing double, but would like to hear from members here. Any links and suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 12-26-2013, 10:51 AM
ambidextrous1 ambidextrous1 is offline
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When I wanted to build my own first aid kit some years ago, I went to one of the local community colleges and spoke with one of their EMT Instructors. She had a handout for her students & gave a copy of it to me. This became my shopping list. In addition to the list, you'll need an appropriate sized tote bag (range bag?) from the "usual sources".

None of the items on the list are prescription drugs; for those items, you'll need some help from a friendly doctor. I also added some Vietnam-era battlefield medical items, which are readily available.
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  #3  
Old 12-26-2013, 10:56 AM
Vin63 Vin63 is offline
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^^^This is similar to what I did for my first aid kits in my race car trailer and shop. I spoke with a friend who is an EMT, and he provided me a list of critical items, and several first aid kits that he personally uses that are pretty comprehensive.
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  #4  
Old 12-26-2013, 10:57 PM
shocktroop shocktroop is offline
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I'm in the medical field, and the biggest thing I see people doing when building these kits, is buy things they can't use. Kind of like carrying a weapon that you don't know how to effectively operate. Depending on the situation, the when's and where's, and what your patient population is, can be a big determining factor. Restore the breathing, stop the bleeding, treat for shock is the basic gist of it, but that doesn't really begin to scratch the surface. Also depends on your level of training and what your comfortable with. I keep a supply stocked at the house for the wife for when I'm gone but I tailor it to things that she would be familiar with, basic meds, bandages, battle dressings, simple splints and such. My idea on this might be different than others from 18yrs of either lugging a "first aid kit" on my back in the field or caring for a crew independently under the oceans surface.
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  #5  
Old 12-26-2013, 11:31 PM
grubbylabs grubbylabs is offline
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As said above have only what you know how to use. Basic bandages a CPR shield and some basic meds for you( Tylenol or Advil or similar type stuff) any regular meds you may take.

The biggest thing to me is that too many people stop for accidents usually. The biggest killer of EMS personnel is on coming traffic. Unless the people in the accident are worth your life or a family members life don't stop. If people can't see a fire engine and EMS or Fire personnel in reflective gear, what makes you think they will see your car and or you?

Also, if you are not trained to do it, don't. You are more likely to make it worse. As in if your not a life guard don't go after a drowning person.

Also tourniquets, they are not the evil that many people have made them out to be. One year we had a surgeon come and put on a CEU class for all the local EMS and he talked about tourniquets, it was a very interesting lecture. The gist of it was that thousands of people every day go into OR's and some one puts a tourniquet on them and it's there from a few minutes to several hours and they very seldom if ever have any problems. So if you are dealing with a lot and don't have time to baby site a persistently bleeding wound don't feel bad about using one. Just make sure it's fairly wide and remember you only have to put it on tight enough to control the bleeding.
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  #6  
Old 12-27-2013, 11:25 AM
Fastball Fastball is offline
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It's been a few years, but I was a trained First Responder, plus have been CPR certified for a number of years, so not unfamiliar with protocols.

Again,this is basically a personal survival pack w/med kit in case I am trapped 40 miles from home in a bad situation. Not looking to play EMT or anything during my daily commutes.

Remember that earthquake that hit VA a couple of years ago? I know it wasn't, the "big one", but I felt that sucker in Baltimore and this is what has really got me thinking, what if.....?
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  #7  
Old 12-27-2013, 11:38 AM
Boomer121906 Boomer121906 is offline
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I'm defintly paying attention to this thread and hopefully you get some good info bc I'm working on a cpl med kits myself. I think putting them together will be better and less expensive than buying one. Ive gathered some stuff threw the years. Suture kits and some antibiotics and plenty of bandages from my bad burn accident but need to put it all together in a cpl kits.

Not to hijack the thread as I'm sure it would be helpful to the OP as well as me and others but can/will anyone provide thier personal list of must haves in a med-PAC ???

As the OP is a dizzying effect trying to get GOOD info online. Sometimes to much info is just that TOO MUCH.

This to the OP and ALL those that help.
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  #8  
Old 12-27-2013, 12:19 PM
CombatDiver CombatDiver is offline
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You must live on the eastside of the US to be able to travel out of state in 40 miles. 40 miles one way is standard back in Utah where I just moved from and so is preparedness. We regularly taught self preparedness at the fire station. A group worth looking into who has spent a lot of time developing lists of supplies as well as disaster training is CERT (Community Emergency Response Team). It's like boy scouts for adults and falls under FEMA.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2013, 12:16 AM
Jester122 Jester122 is offline
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There is a YouTube personality named Patriot Nurse who put out a video about building a first aid kit for approximately $50 that I've been trying to assemble. Granted, it's more of a keep at home in case the proverbial fecal matter collides with an air oscillation device type of thing, but she also explains that the three big things to consider are skin integrity, diarrhea, and upper respiratory care.

If you know or trust someone with EMT/medical experience, go with that. I have no idea who the hell Patriot Nurse is in real life or what her qualifications are, but was trying to expand out from just watching people shoot stuff. Eventually I will just take some classes.
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2013, 12:26 AM
AFshirt AFshirt is offline
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I keep the same IFAK in my car that I had attached to my vest in Iraq (with non expired items of course). If I need anything more than quickclot or at worst the CAT then the victim is going to die anyway.
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  #11  
Old 12-28-2013, 08:07 AM
hukuzatuna hukuzatuna is offline
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I have a small med kit attached to the outside of my go-bag, but honestly I forget where I picked it up. (Yeah, helpful, right?) I have a huge kit in the back of the Jeep that's designed to support a squad, along with the recovery gear, just in case I have to keep someone(s) alive until first responders get there.

ITS Tactical has a series of pre-packaged combat med kits that I think are excellent, and would buy if I needed another med kit. One example is their Tallboy med kit. MOLLE-compatible, of course, and comes in a variety of colors depending on your application.

ObQual: I started doing serious mountaineering and spelunking before the days of cell phones and radios (showing my age here), and was on a cave rescue team (lots of caves back in Indiana), so most of my training has been for situations where first responders are at least many hours, if not days/weeks away, and how to keep seriously injured people alive for that length of time (sucking chest wounds, etc....) I strongly urge you to complete several of the excellent medical training courses available today so you know and understand the use of the materials in the kits. At a minimum, advanced first aid/CPR (which IMHO everyone should have anyway.)

Cheers,
Phil

Last edited by hukuzatuna; 12-28-2013 at 08:07 AM. Reason: corrected typo in URL
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2014, 12:22 PM
eljay45 eljay45 is offline
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I keep the same IFAK that AFshirt mentioned in my range bag, I added a few bandaids , electrolyte tablets and some eywash. The kits in my truck and home are similar with the addition of some over the counter medications like pain relievers, ammonium AD, antiseptics, antibiotic ointments and eye wash.
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  #13  
Old 01-01-2014, 03:24 PM
EireRogue EireRogue is offline
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I've got a full first aid bag in the car always. I never go to the range without a Tac-Pack in my cargo pocket. I've used in once on an AD victim and it's worth the carry.

http://trrtactical.blogspot.com/2009...cal-packs.html
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2014, 11:56 PM
Ordnance Ordnance is offline
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I have a case that was pre-kitted that goes between the car and home. Bandaids, antiseptic, small tools, gloves, tourniquet, meds, etc. Can't remember for the life of me where I bought it from though.
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  #15  
Old 01-03-2014, 08:13 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastball View Post
I'm putting together a SHTF bag for in my car. I travel out of state 40 miles, 1-way to & from work and have a nice little collection of things for in it so far. A small one in my wife's car is also in the works.

I am wondering if I'm better off building my own first aid/med kit or is there a kit some may feel is a good all-a-rounder out there for sale. I have been Googling and reading until my eyes are seeing double, but would like to hear from members here. Any links and suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
My thoughts on your primary question (build vs buy) is to build it yourself. If you buy pre-made, you'll over pay for every component. Look at some of the pre-made kits, and price out the items....

The one thing that the pre-mades are good for is the inventory sheet; it should give you a fairly good idea of what you want.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2014, 12:15 PM
CantSkipThisStone CantSkipThisStone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordnance View Post
I have a case that was pre-kitted that goes between the car and home. Bandaids, antiseptic, small tools, gloves, tourniquet, meds, etc. Can't remember for the life of me where I bought it from though.
If you go to your local Walmart you can find them
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  #17  
Old 01-05-2014, 11:45 AM
Gary in TX Gary in TX is offline
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Military IFAK's are a good starting place.



Just add a few things.
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  #18  
Old 01-06-2014, 12:21 PM
johnbrowning1911 johnbrowning1911 is offline
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I have been a “consumer” of first aid kits over about four decades, and have tried a wide range of commercial kits, from el cheapos to fairly advanced, and have assembled my own from time to time. My main interest in first aid kits has been for aviation use in light airplanes and helicopters. In this use, one may be dealing with an off airport landing (crash) in the boonies where assistance could be a long time in coming. (In a LearJet crash in the northeast a few years ago, it took two years to find the aircraft despite the largest search in the region’s history. In this case the occupants died on impact so a first aid kit would have been of no use. The point is that it can take a while and selection a first aid kit should take this into consideration). Assembling your own might allow you to tailor the contents more precisely to your needs, but in most cases you wont save money unless your time is free; you also will not get the benefit of the cumulative experience the manufacturer has gained over the years. Another criticism of the roll-your-own kit is that most are not well organized, and are often just a bunch of stuff dumped in a bag.

I live in the Northeast in a suburban area and my usual travel patterns by car rarely have me out of sight of a possible source of assistance. For this reason I see little need for a “portable field hospital” style kit for my vehicles. I will also add that in the many decades I have been driving and flying, I have never been involved in a situation where a first aid kit would have been useful (beyond the need for an occasional Band Aid around the house or shop). Below I have linked to kits that are my current choices based on the circumstances I think are somewhat likely (none deal with thermonuclear war, for example.) Choice of an appropriate kit will vary with circumstances and personal preferences. YMMV. (NOTE: I distinguish between first aid kits and survival kits. First aid is part of survival, but survival covers a much wider range of needs.)

In each car/truck: http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/...grizzly-1.html

In each aircraft and as a home kit (allowing for a SHTF scenario): http://www.aeromedix.com/Doc_Blue_Fa...dical_Kit.html

In each range bag: an IFAK style kit - many suitable available for no more than $100.

For those traveling well off the beaten path (or maybe even not so far off the path) I also recommend one or more of these (we have one for each seat in the aircraft, and I am considering carrying one in each car): http://www.acrartex.com/products/cat.../resqlink-plb/
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Last edited by johnbrowning1911; 01-06-2014 at 05:58 PM.
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2014, 10:15 AM
hukuzatuna hukuzatuna is offline
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Thanks for the detailed response, John, and for the links. I also go hiking regularly in a very rugged (for this area) nature preserve system that is very popular with groups of mountain bikers and trail runners. I have broken out my combat med kit (which is on my go-bag, which I carry while hiking) on more occasions than I can count because of serious falls by other people, who invariably do not have med kits of their own. I've had to replace many triangular bandages, instacold packs, alcohol wipes, gauze, tape, and a pack of quickclot. It's also amazing to me that even in a group of people who are used to being "in wilderness," if there's no cell phone coverage the entire group is frozen with indecision and don't know what to do, even for simple things like bee stings.

I've never run across an accident that required me to break out the big med kit from the back of the Jeep, like you pointed out, but it doesn't cost me anything to leave it there. I just feel like as soon as I take it out I'll be first on the scene of a bad accident, ya know?
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Old 01-07-2014, 12:15 PM
Gary in TX Gary in TX is offline
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There are these. They're pretty good.

Elite Military IFAK (*Click*)


There are also Military IFAK's that are less expensive ($22 vs $49), but that doesn't include some items like Quik Clot. Someone could just add items/gear as they go.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/IFAK-INFANTR...item3f2e535234



Quote:
  • MOLLE ACU Pouch 7.5" X 5" X 3"
  • TK - 4 military issue tourniquet
  • 1 - Robertazzi NP airway 28 fr
  • 1 - 6" IDF Emergency bandage
  • Fresh roll of 2" surgical tape
  • H & H PRIMED 4 1/2" x 4.1 yds compressed gauze
  • 2 - new pair of large nitrile exam gloves
  • 1 - 5.5" EMT/EMS shear
One of the IFAK's I have was purchased from that guy on eBay for $20-something bucks. Everything was there when it finally got here, but the guy lolly gagged so long that he felt bad and threw in an M-16/M4/AR mag.

You can also buy adult Epi-Pens online.
http://www.canadadrugsuperstore.com/...roductID=44413

Just make sure you get some training on how to use the items and become proficient on patient assessments. The first rule of medicine is 'Do no harm'.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:07 AM
forcefedsupra forcefedsupra is offline
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I went ahead and bought a $40 trauma kit w/ quikclot and just added a sterile stitching kit to it. It has a good variety of items and it's portable. I keep it in my truck and attach it to my pack when I hunt. I am looking at what to add to it since there is a little extra room in the pouch.
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  #22  
Old 01-12-2014, 02:54 PM
Fastball Fastball is offline
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Good feedback, John!!

Thank you of course to all that have responded so far. Great intel.
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  #23  
Old 01-14-2014, 09:01 PM
38357 38357 is offline
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We bought a couple of Czech military surplus first aid kits from centerfire systems. They really emphasized bandages. We added in a few syringes, great for removing ocular foreign bodies. We also have suturing supplies and the knowledge to use them.

We also have a good supply if the medications that we normally take and some growing plants like foxglove, willow, catspaw, oregano and plantain therapeutics. Get books as going online may not be an option.

Part of our preparations include some books "the forgers harvest" on how to find edible weeds. For instance wood sorrel is a green that tastes like lemon. Headed OT.
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  #24  
Old 01-15-2014, 09:39 AM
KneeShot KneeShot is offline
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A nice piece of kit to have would be a SAM SPLINT. Maybe x2. They are great for basic splinting, used in conjunction w/ some ace wrap or triangular bandages. SAM splints are very light, slim and portable.
Not affiated w/ the company.
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  #25  
Old 01-21-2014, 02:25 AM
norb5150 norb5150 is offline
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Here is a very good first aid kit http://shop.sportsmansguide.com/net/...FecRMwodMksAaw
It is small enough to fit in your glove compartment has enough room in it to add items. It doesn't have any non-sense stuff that you are not going to be able to use. For instance the nasal airway in the IFAK is only one size and every ones nasal cavity is different and two most people do not know how to use them nor understand the purpose of them. Blood Clotting adgents take up a sever amount of room in the IFAK. In most cases your going to need more bandages and stabilizing devises then Stop clot which also can be dangerous if used improperly. I'm not knocking the IFAK. It was designed for military applications for in field use where theres a medic close by with more medical/emergency equipment. This is just my .2 on the subject. I am a certified EMT-B in PA. I worked for an EMS service for five years. This above kit is a good kit. You can also find it at surplus stores as it is a military based/issued firstaid kit
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Last edited by norb5150; 01-21-2014 at 02:37 AM. Reason: adding information
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