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  #1  
Old 10-25-2013, 10:14 AM
kyew kyew is offline
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Preparedness Items

What are some of the items in your go bag/BOB/SHTF shelter that are most useful or interesting?

I live by the principle that simple things are much more valuable than complex things (one of the reasons I love the 1911 design).

After having read a few of the other threads, I notice a lot of people rely on things like batteries and stored food.

I've been finding "wind-up" - or dynamo - lights and two-way radios. While they use batteries that have a finite lifespan, they're rechargeable by winding them up. A lot of them have solar panels for recharging when you have access to sunlight.

I've also abandoned the "carry as much food as possible" mentality. My go bag weighs about 100 lbs right now without food. I do however carry books (that weigh a lot less than food) that have pictures of edible and medicinal plants in my state/region, and instructions on preparing them. After all, carried food is temporary, while skills/knowledge can't be stolen or lost.

The very essence of preparedness is being ready for... you know not what. By definition, you don't know how long you'll be without the luxuries of civilization, making it difficult to plan sufficiently. Having alternate, long-term solutions to very basic problems is a must.
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2013, 10:45 AM
corvo450 corvo450 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyew View Post
what are some of the items in your go bag/bob/shtf shelter that are most useful or interesting?

I live by the principle that simple things are much more valuable than complex things (one of the reasons i love the 1911 design).

After having read a few of the other threads, i notice a lot of people rely on things like batteries and stored food.

I've been finding "wind-up" - or dynamo - lights and two-way radios. While they use batteries that have a finite lifespan, they're rechargeable by winding them up. A lot of them have solar panels for recharging when you have access to sunlight.

I've also abandoned the "carry as much food as possible" mentality. My go bag weighs about 100 lbs right now without food. I do however carry books (that weigh a lot less than food) that have pictures of edible and medicinal plants in my state/region, and instructions on preparing them. After all, carried food is temporary, while skills/knowledge can't be stolen or lost.

The very essence of preparedness is being ready for... You know not what. By definition, you don't know how long you'll be without the luxuries of civilization, making it difficult to plan sufficiently. Having alternate, long-term solutions to very basic problems is a must.
+1
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2013, 10:58 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is offline
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100lbs isn't a "go" bag if you actually have to "go" anywhere. The rule of thumb for sustained movement is 55lbs or 1/3 of your body weight, whichever is less.

I like the idea of reference materials, but books are heavy. Try making copies of just the sections you need, at 1/4 size, to reduce weight. Go through all your gear, and determine what you NEED- and if a lighter version is an option.
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  #4  
Old 10-25-2013, 11:25 AM
kyew kyew is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
100lbs isn't a "go" bag if you actually have to "go" anywhere. The rule of thumb for sustained movement is 55lbs or 1/3 of your body weight, whichever is less.

I like the idea of reference materials, but books are heavy. Try making copies of just the sections you need, at 1/4 size, to reduce weight. Go through all your gear, and determine what you NEED- and if a lighter version is an option.
That may be true for the average person, but someone who has been conditioned for it can cover an appreciable amount of ground with 100 lbs. easily. Even as out of shape as I am at 44 years old, I carried that same go bag four miles in two hours, with a ten minute break in the middle.

You'll never know what you can do unless you push yourself.

Still, as I mentioned, I'm always looking for ways to lighten that load. I like your idea of making the copies smaller print and saving weight that way. As far as what I absolutely need, I could scrap the whole bag and muddle through. It would be harder, but I could do it. I think of the contents of my go bag as being "essential luxuries". While I don't need any of it, it would sure make it easier to do the things I may have to do.
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  #5  
Old 10-25-2013, 12:02 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is offline
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Originally Posted by kyew View Post
That may be true for the average person, but someone who has been conditioned for it can cover an appreciable amount of ground with 100 lbs. easily. Even as out of shape as I am at 44 years old, I carried that same go bag four miles in two hours, with a ten minute break in the middle.

You'll never know what you can do unless you push yourself.
I have pushed myself, probably much more than average. I grew up hiking and climbing in the Cascade Mountains. I've been in the army for 24+ years, everything from jumping into Panama in 89 to humping the mountains in Afghanistan. The rule of thumb I cited is the generally accepted military standard for sustained movement. If you have to carry it day in, day out, 100lbs is impractical. Hell, when I went to Panama, my ruck weighed 120lbs, plus a T10 parachute, M60 machine gun.....I barely made it on the plane, ans I was a 19 year old Ranger school graduate. The second I hit the ground, everything but water, ammo, and food got dumped.

4 miles at 2mph is a start, but can you carry that same ruck 15 miles a day, over varied terrain? What about day 2....? Day 3....?

The point is, if you have to move, 100lbs is a lot of weight, and it is not sustainable. I'm about your age, and in pretty good shape, but no way I'm carrying a load that heavy more than about 20 miles, and I'm not moving for a week after I do it.
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I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain. ~ John Adams
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  #6  
Old 10-25-2013, 12:23 PM
kyew kyew is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
I have pushed myself, probably much more than average. I grew up hiking and climbing in the Cascade Mountains. I've been in the army for 24+ years, everything from jumping into Panama in 89 to humping the mountains in Afghanistan. The rule of thumb I cited is the generally accepted military standard for sustained movement. If you have to carry it day in, day out, 100lbs is impractical. Hell, when I went to Panama, my ruck weighed 120lbs, plus a T10 parachute, M60 machine gun.....I barely made it on the plane, ans I was a 19 year old Ranger school graduate. The second I hit the ground, everything but water, ammo, and food got dumped.

4 miles at 2mph is a start, but can you carry that same ruck 15 miles a day, over varied terrain? What about day 2....? Day 3....?

The point is, if you have to move, 100lbs is a lot of weight, and it is not sustainable. I'm about your age, and in pretty good shape, but no way I'm carrying a load that heavy more than about 20 miles, and I'm not moving for a week after I do it.
All good points. As far as what I would be carrying that load out for, it wouldn't be for sustained travel. In a situation where I would need to move for survival, I wouldn't have far to go to be out of harm's way. There's plenty of woods around here where I could lose myself fairly easily, all within a day's walk, even at 2 mph. It really wouldn't be practical to keep moving. I wouldn't be carrying enough food to be able to keep moving indefinitely. I'd have to hunt/trap/fish, so I'd have to stop somewhere, sometime.

I could do it though. There are things I would throw out if I had to, but I'd take what I could to begin with, and dump what I couldn't carry later. And the whole time I'd be losing more weight as I went (assuming I carried some food with me at the beginning). At 6' 2" and 200 lbs., I'm fairly strong. Ran distance in high school, so I know I have more endurance than speed. Grew up in the woods so I know the easiest ways to move through them. But even knowing what you can do under normal "pushing" circumstances, you would probably surprise yourself with what you could do under extreme circumstances.
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Pain is simply weakness leaving the body.

Holding onto freedom is like holding a handful of sand.
If we aren't constantly vigilant against losing it, we will have lost it,
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  #7  
Old 10-29-2013, 07:53 PM
motorcycle joe motorcycle joe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyew View Post
That may be true for the average person, but someone who has been conditioned for it can cover an appreciable amount of ground with 100 lbs. easily. Even as out of shape as I am at 44 years old, I carried that same go bag four miles in two hours, with a ten minute break in the middle.

You'll never know what you can do unless you push yourself.

Still, as I mentioned, I'm always looking for ways to lighten that load. I like your idea of making the copies smaller print and saving weight that way. As far as what I absolutely need, I could scrap the whole bag and muddle through. It would be harder, but I could do it. I think of the contents of my go bag as being "essential luxuries". While I don't need any of it, it would sure make it easier to do the things I may have to do.
I'm 68 and I'm taking my dirt bike (DR650). 100lbs should not be a problem.
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  #8  
Old 10-29-2013, 08:04 PM
raggedwhole! raggedwhole! is offline
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Man invented the wheel a long time ago. I prefer to carry a 100 lbs of fuel. Also 500 cc of displacement can take you a long way for a little fuel. I am in better shape than most people physically.
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  #9  
Old 10-29-2013, 08:11 PM
raggedwhole! raggedwhole! is offline
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Originally Posted by motorcycle joe View Post
I'm 68 and I'm taking my dirt bike (DR650). 100lbs should not be a problem.
I saw your post after I typed mine. Apparently we are of the same mindset. I'm guessing we both carry a 1911 as well.
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  #10  
Old 10-29-2013, 10:47 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Around here we plan to shoot people riding through on motorcycles.

That way we can take all of their gear.

Just kidding guys. I could not help it.
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  #11  
Old 10-30-2013, 07:09 AM
CavCop CavCop is offline
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A Spec Plus Spax, Lone Eagle in .223, D-Rings, bungee cords, 550 cord, 100 MPH tape, sharpening stones, monofiliment fishing line, rat traps with 12 GA holes in them, 12 GA ammo, nails, hammer, Everclear grain alcohol, bandana's, etc...
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  #12  
Old 10-30-2013, 08:44 AM
1911pete 1911pete is offline
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I seen multiple articles now advising to fortify in place. This saves you the problems of having to decide what to take, weight limited inventory, dangers on the road and the possibility of your bug out location being compromised by the time you get there anyway. Multiple experts now advise against bugging out.
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  #13  
Old 10-30-2013, 10:46 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is offline
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Originally Posted by 1911pete View Post
I seen multiple articles now advising to fortify in place. This saves you the problems of having to decide what to take, weight limited inventory, dangers on the road and the possibility of your bug out location being compromised by the time you get there anyway. Multiple experts now advise against bugging out.
The decision to stay or go really depends on several things:
The type/severity of event- Katrina killed a lot of people because they chose to stay.
The expected duration of the event- How long will it take for things to get back to normal
Location- Can you secure and sustain your location? Easier to do at a rural farm than an NYC apartment.
Lead time- Time is your friend. A hurricane gives plenty of warning, an earthquake does not.

Ultimately, there isn't a MK1 MOD 0, one size fits all solution. Thats where prior planning comes in.
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I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain. ~ John Adams
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  #14  
Old 10-30-2013, 01:18 PM
gunslingergirl gunslingergirl is offline
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At my age if it comes to hiking long distances we are staying where we are. I live in a mid size town 100 miles from a city. We figure we can sustain in place for a month, we have a river, food and ammo. Beyond that we'd need to head to the high country - which would probably not be very successful considering the occupants already there might not greet us with gifts. But our plan is to "pick up" a couple of M-1 Abrams to carry our stuff and sort of ease our way through any obstacles like preppers.

Probably not a very good plan I know, but that's all I got. That or a plane, but you can't carry much in a Piper.
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  #15  
Old 10-30-2013, 11:44 PM
Red Dirt Dave Red Dirt Dave is offline
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I would suggest that one go, now, and apply the information gleaned from books and Youtube videos BEFORE those skills may be needed to survive.

It is good to know how to do things. It is better to have done them. You will find, only by trying, what will work and what will not. That will be a hard lesson if learned when one's life depends on the grade.

P.S. One would be well advised to learn to make and use primitive weapons, (they are actually hardly so) traps, snares & etc. before one is forced into it by circumstance.
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  #16  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:32 AM
kyew kyew is offline
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Originally Posted by 1911pete View Post
I seen multiple articles now advising to fortify in place. This saves you the problems of having to decide what to take, weight limited inventory, dangers on the road and the possibility of your bug out location being compromised by the time you get there anyway. Multiple experts now advise against bugging out.
What experts would they be? Do they intentionally find disasters to practice on?

No offense intended to you, but anyone who claims to be an "expert" on a subject that's almost by definition unpredictable, any advice they give is suspect. Those experts sounds like someone giving advice on how best to deal with the afterlife.

Unless the advice is as wccountryboy said and plan for any possibility. That's a tall order too, but at least you won't be caught flatfooted when you have to head for high ground and you were expecting to be able to stay in place.
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Pain is simply weakness leaving the body.

Holding onto freedom is like holding a handful of sand.
If we aren't constantly vigilant against losing it, we will have lost it,
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  #17  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:35 AM
kyew kyew is offline
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Originally Posted by Red Dirt Dave View Post
I would suggest that one go, now, and apply the information gleaned from books and Youtube videos BEFORE those skills may be needed to survive.

It is good to know how to do things. It is better to have done them. You will find, only by trying, what will work and what will not. That will be a hard lesson if learned when one's life depends on the grade.

P.S. One would be well advised to learn to make and use primitive weapons, (they are actually hardly so) traps, snares & etc. before one is forced into it by circumstance.
I second this vehemently. I had this same thought a couple years ago and set about doing just that. It's harder to make a fire without tools than you might think. Especially if everything is wet! But trying it before you need to try it is a learning experience well worth having before you're dumped into a situation where you have to learn it on the fly.
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Pain is simply weakness leaving the body.

Holding onto freedom is like holding a handful of sand.
If we aren't constantly vigilant against losing it, we will have lost it,
one grain at a time, before we realize it's gone.
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  #18  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:41 AM
Russ Jackson Russ Jackson is offline
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Originally Posted by raggedwhole! View Post
I saw your post after I typed mine. Apparently we are of the same mindset. I'm guessing we both carry a 1911 as well.

+1
I have a KLR and a Concours 14. Both of which are set up to haul quite a bit of gear. Anyone ever build a faraday cage for a motorcycle?
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  #19  
Old 11-02-2013, 07:16 PM
hatidua hatidua is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyew View Post
I live by the principle that simple things are much more valuable than complex things (one of the reasons I love the 1911 design).
I love 1911's as much as anyone but if the goal is simplicity, 1911's aren't winning that race...nor even coming close.
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  #20  
Old 11-02-2013, 07:24 PM
kyew kyew is offline
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Originally Posted by hatidua View Post
I love 1911's as much as anyone but if the goal is simplicity, 1911's aren't winning that race...nor even coming close.
Your opinion being what it is (an opinion), this isn't the thread for that discussion.
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Pain is simply weakness leaving the body.

Holding onto freedom is like holding a handful of sand.
If we aren't constantly vigilant against losing it, we will have lost it,
one grain at a time, before we realize it's gone.
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  #21  
Old 11-05-2013, 08:20 AM
markwell markwell is offline
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Having lived in the Alleghenies since before the Mel Tappen years 'til present day, I agree with 1911pete that staying put is preferable to moving. Unless dire circumstances required it, we wouldn't think of leaving our place in the mountains. Dealing with hurricane Juan in '85 was an education but basically we got along just fine. Stocking up is just part of rural living as is being reletively self reliant. Having good neighbors also helps. Getting home, if out and about on a trip, is a concern, but not something we dwell on.

We are fortunate.
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  #22  
Old 12-08-2013, 03:13 PM
fhaxton fhaxton is offline
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We're in the country and don't foresee a bugout situation. The main problem we would face is people piling out of the cities to try to survive in the country. I dont know how to exactly deal with that. Even with a fortress the siege eventually wins. We have plenty of deer and turkey for us but not for the nearby city. We really don't have anyplace to bugout to.
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  #23  
Old 12-08-2013, 06:24 PM
Biged65 Biged65 is offline
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I have a plan if we have to leave but I'd stay in my house as long as possible. I live just outside the city and have a lake and river close by, wildlife is plentiful and my biggest fear would be the "city folk" heading my way.
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  #24  
Old 12-10-2013, 09:13 PM
LWolken LWolken is offline
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stream light sidewinder compact II for a head lamp. Runs on (1) aa, aaa, cr123 hard to beat the versatility. Water Pasturation Indicator (WAPI) allows visual confirmation of water temp for pasturation which can be done in plastic bottles.
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  #25  
Old 12-11-2013, 05:09 PM
aka.cyberman aka.cyberman is offline
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As a former Backpacker, I would suggest to anyone interested in putting together a Bug Out Bag to Google "The Ten Essentials". These items will get you started and you can add on with creature comforts to fit your needs. This will also start you in the right direction to stimulate your thought process on what you really need. I can pack a week's worth of stuff and keep it to around 50 pounds. This wouldn't include a firearm with ammo though.
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