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  #1  
Old 10-03-2013, 04:26 PM
Gabe Asher Gabe Asher is offline
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Hurricane Katrina- What Have You Learned

I see we have a new sub forum for Disaster Prep- which I think is awesome and about time !

Here is what I would like to see: Using History is the best way to learn (so lets just start with one historical incident at a time and move on to others later) !

What should/could the average citizen do both in preparation and the aftermath...in say another similar incident like Katrina ?
(yes this is old event and could be said to be MMQB.. but it is useful to people that believe learning from History helps keep it from repeating itself) !!

GA
  #2  
Old 10-03-2013, 07:07 PM
ccamp_fx ccamp_fx is offline
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Hide your guns!
  #3  
Old 10-03-2013, 07:38 PM
robbf213 robbf213 is offline
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Pack and leave, that's what they all should have done.
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Old 10-03-2013, 07:40 PM
bigdogdaddy bigdogdaddy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbf213 View Post
Pack and leave, that's what they all should have done.
I don't think that is what the OP is looking for, but I believe it is the correct answer. I was there afterwards. They should have all left.
  #5  
Old 10-03-2013, 07:44 PM
robbf213 robbf213 is offline
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Originally Posted by bigdogdaddy View Post
I don't think that is what the OP is looking for, but I believe it is the correct answer. I was there afterwards. They should have all left.
That's the only answer I could come up with. I was there also, it was like another world, in a bad way.
  #6  
Old 10-03-2013, 07:48 PM
bigdogdaddy bigdogdaddy is offline
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Originally Posted by robbf213 View Post
That's the only answer I could come up with. I was there also, it was like another world, in a bad way.
All the debris hanging 30 to 50 feet up in the trees looked like some weird special effect from a Tim Burton movie. I will never forget it.
  #7  
Old 10-03-2013, 08:40 PM
CPTKILLER CPTKILLER is offline
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Plan ahead.

Take the necessities (records, food, important stuff, family, pets, food, and medicine).

Be prepared to stay away until things are better.

Insure that you have a place to go.
  #8  
Old 10-03-2013, 08:54 PM
rs00956 rs00956 is offline
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That Bush was a scuba diver.Seriously think for yourself and don't wait for someone to tell you to leave.
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  #9  
Old 10-03-2013, 09:03 PM
1911cherry 1911cherry is offline
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I lived through it the first time in Bay St. Louis, now I live 150 miles north of the bay, have plenty of cash, food , water, gas and ammo on hand. A months supply of medications is a good idea also, did I mention cash? My bank was underwater so all my accounts were frozen for weeks after the storm, money in the bank is no good when you cant use it. I am ready to bug out to anywhere else USA if the shtf again.
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  #10  
Old 10-08-2013, 12:11 AM
CavCop CavCop is offline
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I was/am a first responder. In the National Guard we went into Katrina and were the first ones in on Rita.

I have found every State is different for how ready they are (Texas is more ready than mosts states from what I know and have seen). I took part in setting up a few of the Texas mass exit plans and it is well set up. Best bet is exit when warning come, dont wait till it is to late. Take what is important, secure what you leave behind as best you can.

Dont expect the Federal Government to do much but write checks and spend money on silly programs. Be ready to care for yourself for a few days. Be ready for what might happen in your area (wind/water/fire/electricity).

Even in Texas, we took in guns if you had them out on the street. Dont go out in public armed with a long gun.

Obey cerfews, dont steal a generator and run it indoors, it is not stealing if you just take what you really need to live. If its luxury, its stealing.

If you live in the county seat, you will get supplies. The county seat is not always the largest city. The Goverment/FEMA wants rules and regs followed over real help/aid.

Pets and Animals are priority for some. Take your pets with you.

No matter how bad you think things are, soldiers have done more with less than what you have, so be ready to suck up bad situations.

Police will warn one time. Then all bets are off.

Recovery is a group effort, you might have to give up on your project/property and help a neighbor.

Doing nothing but waiting for the Government is what everone else is doing, be different and do something.

Having tobbaco or alcohol can be better than having money.
  #11  
Old 10-08-2013, 07:12 AM
dep2386 dep2386 is offline
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I have made five hurricane deployments to include Andrew and Katrinia. CavCop has given excellent advice. I would simply add EVACUATE as soon as possible. Take your pets, legal papers, small family heirlooms, firearms, and ammo. I would take photos of your home and vehicles for insurance purposes.

If your going to stay, realize this. You are going to need at least a weeks worth of food, water, and supplies. It will take at least three to four days for assistance to arrive. Due to the erratic travel paths of hurricanes, responders have to wait to see exactly where the storm has traveled.

If you decide to stay bunker up with a group. Make sure you have id on you at all times,so you will not be mistaken for a looter. Realize that you will be confronting looters and desparate people who have not prepared. The use of lethal force is a real possibility. A single person cannot stay up 24 hours a day for days at a time. This isn't a Hollywood movie.

If the local goverment issues a mandatory evacuation. You cannot be forced to leave. However your area will be the last to receive assistance.
  #12  
Old 10-08-2013, 07:21 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Lessons learned:

1. Understand the hazards of the area you live in. Be prepared to evacuate if needed. Pay attention to warnings.
2. Have a plan and resources in place; remain flexible.
3. Don't rely on any government entity to take care of you, they will screw it up.
4. Soliders/LEOs/ FEMA etc will NOT respect your constitutional rights in any way.
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  #13  
Old 10-08-2013, 08:34 AM
Stan_TheGunNut Stan_TheGunNut is offline
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This has been around for a while but is still a good read:

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/bl...ons/index.html

It's written by a man who lived in New Orleans and had to evacuate. It has some good points to consider.
  #14  
Old 10-08-2013, 10:59 AM
flyinrock flyinrock is offline
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Living in Mobile,AL teaches people about hurricanes! Those in low coastal areas are fools to stick around when a major portion of the hurricane is due to hit. Countless people have died while foolishly hosting wind parties and got drowned by the surge, or collapsed buildings. My place was 240' above sea level so our major concern was wind damage with trees coming down, power lines down, fences and roofs being destroyed. I was flying helicopters in the gulf and did some later flights taking photographers along the coast to survey damage. I have never seen so many blue tarps on roofs and jokingly referred to them as the "Katrina Roofing Company". The extent of damage from the storm surge was sobering. I was also in the area during Camille, and Katrina was a twin.
After the storm, the clean up begins. Power was out for many, water supplies were suspect or outright contaminated. Supplies coming in were limited with road/bridge damage. Stores were quickly cleaned out by the unprepared and some law breaking was rampant in a few areas.
My home was prepared with at least a two week food supply of staples that did not require refrigeration. Water was usually not a major issue between the pool, the hot tub, and the 50 gallons we would put in when a hurricane was due. I did learn to get some SteriPens for water sterilization for our consumption. I first took one to Uganda several years back and treated ALL my drinking water with it, and never got sick.
We also have a small 2000W Honda generator (now 20 years old and still works fine) to run fans and to keep the refrig and freezer cold. Alternated between the refrig and freezer and kept them closed as much as possible. Had 20 gallons of gasoline stashed in "cans" for the generator and the cars. It was usually 3-4 days before things began to get normal again.
Bottom line is some common sense (which seems to be in short supply these days?) and preparation for the area you live in. If you are in a flood plain, or in a coastal tide area, get out before you get trapped or worse. Take your valuables and pets and do a lot of praying while you head for high ground.
Prepare for wind damage, have some supplies to last for two weeks and you'll most likely be OK. God knows there is a plethora of information for anyone with half a lobe. Waiting until the eye is 24 hours out is a poor time to prepare! Like I said, common sense is in short supply it seems?
Flyinrock
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  #15  
Old 10-08-2013, 11:45 AM
SthTxOne SthTxOne is offline
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People in New Orleans take a chance just deciding to live there. Its below sea level. I disagree with the argument of many people saying hit the road and leave. Yes that's a semi good idea if its started a week early which is difficult since a week before noone will know where the hurricane is going. I live on the gulf coast area close to houston. When the media started in on the potential for it hitting here and quote experts started urging evryone to leave there was a huge problem. During both storms all the major highways and interstates from houston heading to san antonio, dallas or any evacuation routes where bumper to bumper almost not moving traffic for at least 3 days. Ok think of this. . What would happened with tens or maybe hundreds of thousands of people stuck in cars. Cannot move and no shelter and then the hurrican does actually come downdown on them. There would be twice the casualties. Id say know where you live, what chances you want tke whether its best to stay where you are at. And take whatevere the media or expert advice is and ask yourself if they know what they are talking about. People were stocking up on refrigerated meats, electric can openers and useless junk the news agencies were suggesting.
  #16  
Old 10-08-2013, 06:02 PM
CavCop CavCop is offline
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Originally Posted by SthTxOne View Post
People in New Orleans take a chance just deciding to live there. Its below sea level. I disagree with the argument of many people saying hit the road and leave. Yes that's a semi good idea if its started a week early which is difficult since a week before noone will know where the hurricane is going. I live on the gulf coast area close to houston. When the media started in on the potential for it hitting here and quote experts started urging evryone to leave there was a huge problem. During both storms all the major highways and interstates from houston heading to san antonio, dallas or any evacuation routes where bumper to bumper almost not moving traffic for at least 3 days. Ok think of this. . What would happened with tens or maybe hundreds of thousands of people stuck in cars. Cannot move and no shelter and then the hurrican does actually come downdown on them. There would be twice the casualties. Id say know where you live, what chances you want tke whether its best to stay where you are at. And take whatevere the media or expert advice is and ask yourself if they know what they are talking about. People were stocking up on refrigerated meats, electric can openers and useless junk the news agencies were suggesting.
People in the Houston area waited till near the end to leave and many did not leave. It was a cluster as many people did not have enough fuel and many did not want to take toll roads. We had to do a lot of classes, posting of signs, warning signs, media, and others things. The current set up is better.

My unit took up camp just outside of Houston in a fortified building with our equipment. We road in as the storm was leaving. We are one of two armed response Guard units. We teamed with Texas DPS to secure major shopping area's and them moved on to the Beaumont Ford rodeo/ice hockey area where we staged for a day and then moved to help clear roads in Hardin County where we set up in Kountze where the county seat was. Then we went to Silsbee where the majority of the population was. We violated FEMA and set up at the local McDonalds, then Fire Station to help those that needed it. We also took care of Wal-Mart, and they took care of us. One thing Texas was not going to do was let looters run the streets. Funny or sad thing was 99% of the looters we dealt with were later identified as being from NO. They thought everything should be free and wanted everything from the Government. It took us a short amount of time to find out who the NO people were and we dealt with them in a not so nice way.

Getting out of Houston now has set routes and gas stations have to keep a set amount of fuel on hand. We teamed with AT&T and have system to use school busses and private charters to get people and animals from Houston to set area's. Not everyone needs to go to San Antonio. We can track the people and busses. We have plans for securing businesses, but not not residences. Rita was dealt with well, almost to well IMHO and a lot of waste was at the end.

I also found a huge new found respect for two Smokejumping teams that worked with us clearing trees/brush. F-ing STUDS.
  #17  
Old 10-08-2013, 08:41 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
Lessons learned:

1. Understand the hazards of the area you live in. Be prepared to evacuate if needed. Pay attention to warnings.
2. Have a plan and resources in place; remain flexible.
3. Don't rely on any government entity to take care of you, they will screw it up.
4. Soliders/LEOs/ FEMA etc will NOT respect your constitutional rights in any way.
That last bit is just fracked up...
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  #18  
Old 10-09-2013, 06:34 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
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Originally Posted by Capt. Methane View Post
That last bit is just fracked up...
How so? The topic is lessons learned from Katrina. FACT: NOPD did violate the Constitutional rights of citizens. FACT: One of our members on this forum acknowledged that his NG unit seized weapons. FACT: If you go to ANY camp/facility/shelter operated by a govenment entitiy, you will not be allowed to possess arms there.

Since all of the above actions occurred during Katrina, a reasonable lesson to take away from the event is that its foopish to assume that various government entities will have any respect for your personal liberties.
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  #19  
Old 10-09-2013, 01:46 PM
sousana sousana is offline
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I've learned what I've known all along, the only one you can depend on to help you and your family is your preparedness. I keep food stores designed to stay viable for 30 years in my walk in vault, enough for 40 for a year, for my wife and I, along with water that is changed out yearly.

Plenty of food, water, access to an underground water supply well, solar panels that can be set up and taken down fast, very ample weapon and ammo supply along with bows, arrows, swords, knives, crossbows and bolts designed for big game hunting. I also maintain a very large supply of 1/2 ounce silver rounds to be used for barter.
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2013, 11:20 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Originally Posted by wccountryboy View Post
How so? The topic is lessons learned from Katrina. FACT: NOPD did violate the Constitutional rights of citizens. FACT: One of our members on this forum acknowledged that his NG unit seized weapons. FACT: If you go to ANY camp/facility/shelter operated by a govenment entitiy, you will not be allowed to possess arms there.

Since all of the above actions occurred during Katrina, a reasonable lesson to take away from the event is that its foopish to assume that various government entities will have any respect for your personal liberties.
I do not dispute the veracity of your claims and the matter of the illegal seizure of arms during the aftermath of Katrina is a matter of public record.

It makes the government and their various agents criminals-indeed in violating the Constitution they become traitors-you're point, the lesson you present is exceptionally clear, the government is absolutely not to be trusted when you need them the most... and that's as fracked up as a soup sandwich.

The lesson? Be prepared to take care of yourself and your loved ones...
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  #21  
Old 10-10-2013, 03:47 PM
South South is offline
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As someone who lives in the area:
Leave town. Life really sucks in the aftermath, so does leaving your home and business.
Prepare to drive for 20 or more hours to a place that normally takes 6. Fill up gas in all of your cars, even the ones you leave behind. Fuel will be scarce. I hope you have some 5 gal fuel tanks. Those sell out quick at home depot.
Bring all your lawn furniture inside and secure anything that can fly away and can become a projectile. Board up your windows if you had the plywood cut and stored for these regular events.
Load up on bottled water and non perishable food. Eat all your perishable food. Empty your fridge or be prepared to buy a new fridge when you come back unless you had a built in generator that didn't fail.
Bring your animals if you can, animals aren't allowed in public shelters which is another good reason people stayed behind.
Aftermath: Should you live an a flood plain or a flood zone and stayed you should keep some tools to break out of your attic. People get trapped and die up there.
Don't carry a gun. Cops confiscated guns under marshal law. Some cops shot/executed pets left behind disgracing our city. Other cops shot civilians trying to escape the city on a bridge in the aftermath further disgracing us. Police and emergency personnel were overworked and fatigued. Food is scarce but the national guard was there with MREs, ice, and bottles water, they weren't greedy either. Its the only way the government responded well.
If you left like I did I was not welcome back despite the storm has been passed for a week or two despite owning property and a business. There is no electricity and boil water issues. Since no electricity there are no sewerage pumps to pump out sewerage. Lower lying areas had sewerage back up problems. Cash is king, bank cards don't work well without electricity. You are asked not to put trash outside since no one will be picking it up which will be attracting bugs and animals.
A lot of people got road home grant money. It was an insane amount of money to get residents back. These funds were misused and there were no checks to see that the residents were using the money to make the repairs the money was issued for.
  #22  
Old 10-11-2013, 04:21 AM
erikk erikk is offline
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First of all try to live ABOVE SEA LEVEL
If you live on the coast or low area LEAVE when they tell you to
In my case I live a bit inland at 31 feet above sea level and every June I stock my barn with 100 gallons of gas for my 2 generators, have a well and several refrigerators and freezers along with regular canned and dry food.

we have hurricane shutters for all the doors and windows and they go up at the first sign of a severe storm.
all vehicles are full of gas/diesel as well
It goes without saying that I have ample supplies of ammo, security cameras and we live on 10 acres with farm animals that can be used if needed
When Charlie came to call in 04 with 150mph winds passing through out property leaving us without electric service for almost a month, and minor structural damage to barn we survived very nicely.
Our town and others in its path were pretty well destroyed but clean up went pretty smooth with no looting and very little media coverage due to the small loss of life and the lack of "Oh poor me" attitude and where ae the freebies.
Today everything is rebuilt and back better than it was before the storm. I am sure there will be others but each year we do the same thing to get ready in the event one comes
  #23  
Old 10-11-2013, 07:55 AM
SW686man SW686man is offline
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These recollections are really interesting.

Never get that stuff here in Michigan, 1000 ft above sea level. Sort of makes me re-think my level of preparedness which is, admittedly, very low.
  #24  
Old 10-11-2013, 01:46 PM
Nuclear Nuclear is offline
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In addition to the advice already given, have a chain saw and other tools to clear downed trees and poles. Take it with you if you leave. Leave well before the storm hits if you are going to leave. Fill up your vehicles and spare tanks at least 3 days beforehand. With modern weather models and satellites there is no reason to not know where the storm is going to hit 3 days ahead of time (unless we are talking tornadoes). Have a checklist of things to take with you if you leave. Have multiple ways to communicate with family and/or friends (Landlines, cell phones, internet cable, radios). Have a plan if you can't communicate with family and/or friends as what to do and where to meet.
  #25  
Old 10-12-2013, 06:12 PM
Hardballing Hardballing is offline
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Living almost my entire life in the New Orleans area (with all too brief 4 year stint in Houston), and having been through Katrina, Rita, Andrew and others, here's my take.

Leave. Leave early. Have your items ready to roll, pack them in your vehicle(s). And then leave. You can watch it all unfold on TV somewhere else.

As to preparedness, after Katrina, if you live here and don't have two weeks worth (or more) of stored canned goods, solar rechargers for phones/devices, and generators with spare gas cans you're going to be a burden to those who do. During a small TS Issac two years ago, had "neighbors" who came over to warm soup. Didn't have the foresight to buy a simple $25.00 Coleman propane stove and gas cannisters. DUH. My stove became immediately broken after that if you get my drift. Sorry, ya'll, during these events I have family and true neighbors I rely on, and who rely on me. If you're not them...you're sol. Ant and grasshopper kind of thing.

With regards to weapons (it is a gun site after all). Use your head. You don't really need to be walking the block with your AR/AK do you? Sidearms were in abundance. Shotguns were out on porches. Heaver weapons work just fine immediately inside of your front door (and walls can provide concealment and/or cover) without being "Rambo". Work out a plan, AHEAD OF TIME, with your support group to have a security perimeter in your neighborhood. Then stay indoors and defend that perimeter. Strange vehicles entering your area, you and your neighbors warn of it, step outside armed and thats about all it takes. It's pretty simple stuff really. Believe me, there's more than enough crap left around, and areas undefended, that looters will move on when they see an area being watched and folks armed.

But before all that happens. Leave. It's just stuff after all, not worth your or your family's life. But they'll always be those who won't. Just proves out Darwin imo.
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