Local Comp - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-19-2017, 09:45 PM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
Local Comp

Please? No disrespect intended to the dedicated comp shooters. Lord knows I could never compete nor did I ever have any intention of doing so. Just wanted to toss out a cool experience I had!

Yesterday the Wife and I participated in a local competition that I thought was just right for us. We love to shoot, and is something that we have and can do together. That is important for us.

The comp was presented to us designed as a defensive oriented competition that differed from the sanctioned events in one way in that one’s EDC was strongly encouraged. Racing guns strongly discouraged. It was presented as a typical armed citizen type event. I have no experience in comps. Counting this I have participated in exactly one! I saw participants using everything from their G43’s all the way up to govt size 1911’s. Those were not walkabouts btw. I asked. Women and men mix. No classes, no differentiations. Just folks running stages together.

The stages were inconsistent in that targets were called on the fly and after the timer beep. Lot’s of moving and thinking, which was excellent. You may have been called the easier targets, or maybe the more difficult ones. Under the timer to add the pressure to the accuracy pressure, and great scenarios simulating possible everyday defensive situations. On/off hand, family situations, holding a baby that you can’t let go, house clearing, in your face encounters, etc. Simple scoring. Accuracy first, then times to determine any accuracy ties. But the strong suit, in my opinion, was that the competitors competed against themselves by design.

Results? Well it ran the gamut from really good to great and I thought everyone made an excellent showing. These are not competition shooters and most ran what they carry which was the point of the exercise. I saw one lady who had a couple of bad failures with her carry, which she handled like a true boss. She totally finessed it! No alibies allowed, clock running. I was very impressed and she showed true Grace under Pressure. She finished in the top tier due to her accuracy though her time suffered.

As for me? Well, I shot 100% accuracy with top times except for one stage! I decided to run it in a somewhat unorthodox manner. Cool thing? I had the choice and I was having fun!

Time rocked, accuracy took the hit to 90 %!

We had a gorgeous day weather-wise. The Hosts ran a safety-tight range on a great facility, helped when it was needed on the firing line and I had the opportunity to meet and hang with some very cool folks.

That’s what I call a great day!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-20-2017, 05:52 AM
45collector 45collector is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 427
Sounds like you are now hooked.
__________________
Son, all you need is love... and a .45
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:10 AM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
And I was afraid that might happen 45!
Reply With Quote
 
  #4  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:48 AM
davsco davsco is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 263
uspsa, idpa, etc are a great way to see how you and your gun handle a little bit of pressure and to ferret out any issues. and a lot of fun vs a static range.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:38 AM
waktasz waktasz is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: SE PA
Posts: 1,378
Everything about this post is great except the first line. You just showed that you can definitely do it, so no reason not to now. Get out there to your next local USPSA, IDPA or Steel match and make it happen.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-20-2017, 09:01 AM
YVK YVK is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,595
There is absolutely no reason not to shoot your carry gun from your carry gear in any formal sanctioned match if that's what you want. People are doing it all the time. I've done it. You will have to conform to some rules but it is no biggy. If you went USPSA route, there will be less conforming to do and you can shoot it in any unorthodox fashion you want. Competing against yourself never stops being the case, but at some point it is really beneficial to shoot against people who can really shoot. With a right attitude you will have fun either way.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-20-2017, 05:00 PM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
I appreciate the comments and encouragement guys.

We have some portable target stands (PVC-DIY) for when we can get out to our outdoor range area (The Farm). We like setting up drills and such and doing different things. We even have room for rifle out to about 200 yds. This comp was beneficial to us in many ways, but also in that it gives us a few ideas to expand on this.

Guess we’ll have to look into a shot timer! I swear! Shooting is the Gift that Keeps on Spending!

It was interesting the way it was promoted. It was said that this local thing differed in that in sanctioned comp shooting, folks spent a lot of $$ on gear because they want to win. They advocated the “run what you have” theory. The hosts made a point at the safety meeting of discouraging the participants from smack talking. There were all levels of participants from very new shooter (some experience was necessary), to much more seasoned vets. It was said that being a FNG in one of these events wasn’t easy because they got rode pretty hard! That wouldn’t bother me in the least, but I could see where it might be detrimental to some folks if it happens. This is my only comp so I don’t even know! I think the Hosts just wanted to let it be known that everyone was welcome regardless and maybe keep it kind of low key.

I personally lean the other way. I’m more the kind that cheers the shooter coming off the line. Even if a shooter has a difficult stage, there is always something positive that can be cheered on and encouraged. It’s hard enough if you go out there and suck, but if you make a big deal out of the cools things they did (and rightly so) then you get a big beam and they start to look at things a little differently! I’ve been through all this in my 40+ years as a whitewater kayaker/instructor/competitor. This is a very tight community of folks and if any ribbing is done it is by the vets only to other vets. The new folks get only encouragement all around. YVK said:
Quote:
With a right attitude you will have fun either way
and that pretty much nailed it!

One gal I met had travelled to compete in a sanctioned event. When she told me this I grilled her a bit! She said it was a blast. She finished way on down the line but said it was absolutely worth doing. I wish I could have had the chance to talk to her some more.

We don’t really have much in the way of USPSA or IDPA, or much else in our area so this local thing was welcome. The Hosts, (Hubby/Wifey NRA instructor Cert. RO team) plan on doing this event monthly. I’m thinking I’m going to participate anytime I can! Any event that will help to advance improvement is pretty cool in my book!

Last edited by BroadsideofaBarn; 03-20-2017 at 05:04 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-20-2017, 05:40 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Florence, Alabama, USA
Posts: 17,724
Agree with waktasz, anybody can compete.
Only a few win, but that does not keep the rest of us from enjoying and benefiting from competition.

The sanctioned matches like USPSA and IDPA ensure that you can go anywhere and shoot under the same rules. That doesn't matter if you won't travel to shoot, in which case a local outlaw event might be all you ever need.

How can you "compete against yourself" at random problems seen in USPSA, IDPA, and the various local offshoots? There is no way for you to know how you are progressing in those except by comparison with other shooters doing the same thing the same day.
Now if you take up NRA, GSSF, Steel Challenge, etc., you can keep a log of your performance on their standard events. I have a record of every score I shot in F Class and BPCR MS, and it means something because it is the same requirement every time.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-20-2017, 06:30 PM
Geologist Geologist is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Eureka and SOCAL
Age: 61
Posts: 47
I took a long hiatus from shooting. When I got back into it recently one of the main motivators beyond personal protection was to shoot USPSA/IDPA. I love to compete. It is just in my DNA. I will participate in my first match in way too many years this coming Sunday! Can't wait!!
__________________
An armed Liberal Veteran, imagine that!!!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:08 PM
davsco davsco is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadsideofaBarn View Post
Shooting is the Gift that Keeps on Spending!
haven't heard that one before but it's funny because it is true.

yep, find you some more competitions and have some fun and keep getting better with your guns and gear. seems like every week i find something else i "need."
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:47 PM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
How can you "compete against yourself" at random problems seen in USPSA, IDPA, and the various local offshoots? There is no way for you to know how you are progressing in those except by comparison with other shooters doing the same thing the same day.
Now if you take up NRA, GSSF, Steel Challenge, etc., you can keep a log of your performance on their standard events.
Excellent question Jim. You know man? I wouldn’t have a definitive answer. I have already made it (I hope) abundantly known that I am distinctly unqualified due to my lack of shooting comp experience! I do, however, have some other experiences that apply! So with your permission sir? I would offer a theory (and only a theory) regarding the interesting question you have posed.

First, I concede and agree that standard repeating events create a great baseline for comparison.

How one “competes against oneself” takes on much more, and mostly reveals much more than a score. It is a head game. Get your head right, and you will prevail, regardless of score.

As an example? If you are a newer shooter, how confident are you in handling your firearm? Okay, you are good with safety and you have the mechanics of your weapon going on. Have you practiced working from a holster enough? Carrying magazines and reloading them under pressure? Slide lock? Tactical reload? Acquiring multiple targets under the timer? Quickly? Ability to carry out target calls, discerning targets an acquiring them with an eye toward innocents and surroundings? Shots fired on the fly moving and thinking? Now this is just a couple of examples for the sake of conversation! I saw two or three folks who drew nicely, fumbled with the thumb safety, and could not get off a shot in time to save their life. I saw several non-combatants shot.

A couple of instances made me wonder if I was on site as a potential secondary combatant (meaning a dude that came up on a situation where there was an armed citizen already engaged), how safe would I feel and what would I do?

This is how one competes with one’s self. Though the problems are random, the solutions one performs are not. We make the decisions. They need to be scrutinized and diagnosed with a severe eye. What did you do right? Where did you screw up? How could you have been faster (more attention to training thumb safe/fire on presentation?) and more accurate? What exactly are you shooting at (Bad guy/non-combatants in the background?). Again, just some random thoughts Jim!

I have to believe these things, done in a controlled competition, will help when it comes to a Real World situation, which is what these comps are supposedly advertising and why we do them. And that is very cool.

But to just judge one’s self on scores alone I think is missing a great opportunity to take a harder look at one’s self.

And further Jim, I think we are most likely saying the same thing in different ways to each other! I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to do so sir!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:49 PM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologist View Post
I took a long hiatus from shooting. When I got back into it recently one of the main motivators beyond personal protection was to shoot USPSA/IDPA. I love to compete. It is just in my DNA. I will participate in my first match in way too many years this coming Sunday! Can't wait!!
Awesome Geologist!

Shoot safe, shoot straight, and have a blast man!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-20-2017, 07:52 PM
BroadsideofaBarn BroadsideofaBarn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsco View Post
yep, find you some more competitions and have some fun and keep getting better with your guns and gear. seems like every week i find something else i "need."
Thank you davsco!

I totally screwed the pooch when I convinced the wife to shoot! I can't keep her in ammunition now! Nor can she me!

Life is good!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:32 PM
Geologist Geologist is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Eureka and SOCAL
Age: 61
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadsideofaBarn View Post
Excellent question Jim. You know man? I wouldn’t have a definitive answer.
Even at matches like USPSA, etc. you can still "compete against yourself" by measuring your personal performance. Like you noted, your personal confidence, etc. I also used to track how many mikes I had, how I did at various distances, etc. and tried to improve each time out. So while a match may be different, with different people shooting, etc. I can still get a good sense of how I am personally doing.

I am never going to be a Grand Master, so those guys can rest easy, but I know I'll have fun shooting, improving my own personal performance and having some fun while doing it!!

Plus, the other bug upside to shooting practical pistol especially is that it puts you in a stress situation. While not the same as a true self defense situation you will still have skills that the casual range shooter will not have.

So it's all good, and if you ain't having fun, then go find something else that is more fun!!
__________________
An armed Liberal Veteran, imagine that!!!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-21-2017, 05:20 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,244
Most important thing to do when shooting with your wife.....

Get into reloading and teach her how to reload......!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-21-2017, 09:06 AM
M-Peltier M-Peltier is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadsideofaBarn View Post
Excellent question Jim. You know man? I wouldn’t have a definitive answer. I have already made it (I hope) abundantly known that I am distinctly unqualified due to my lack of shooting comp experience! I do, however, have some other experiences that apply! So with your permission sir? I would offer a theory (and only a theory) regarding the interesting question you have posed.

First, I concede and agree that standard repeating events create a great baseline for comparison.

How one “competes against oneself” takes on much more, and mostly reveals much more than a score. It is a head game. Get your head right, and you will prevail, regardless of score.

As an example? If you are a newer shooter, how confident are you in handling your firearm? Okay, you are good with safety and you have the mechanics of your weapon going on. Have you practiced working from a holster enough? Carrying magazines and reloading them under pressure? Slide lock? Tactical reload? Acquiring multiple targets under the timer? Quickly? Ability to carry out target calls, discerning targets an acquiring them with an eye toward innocents and surroundings? Shots fired on the fly moving and thinking? Now this is just a couple of examples for the sake of conversation! I saw two or three folks who drew nicely, fumbled with the thumb safety, and could not get off a shot in time to save their life. I saw several non-combatants shot.

A couple of instances made me wonder if I was on site as a potential secondary combatant (meaning a dude that came up on a situation where there was an armed citizen already engaged), how safe would I feel and what would I do?

This is how one competes with one’s self. Though the problems are random, the solutions one performs are not. We make the decisions. They need to be scrutinized and diagnosed with a severe eye. What did you do right? Where did you screw up? How could you have been faster (more attention to training thumb safe/fire on presentation?) and more accurate? What exactly are you shooting at (Bad guy/non-combatants in the background?). Again, just some random thoughts Jim!

I have to believe these things, done in a controlled competition, will help when it comes to a Real World situation, which is what these comps are supposedly advertising and why we do them. And that is very cool.

But to just judge one’s self on scores alone I think is missing a great opportunity to take a harder look at one’s self.

And further Jim, I think we are most likely saying the same thing in different ways to each other! I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to do so sir!
You are describing self critique. Self critique is an important tool to advance your shooting skills and I always encourage that. A notebook to record this information is very helpful. But Jim is correct. If your stages are random and every one is in essence shooting a slightly different version of the stage there is no comparative value to how your progressing. In USPSA and other sanctioned competition, stages are equal for everyone and you start to see a pattern of who you are consistently finishing with, and who is finishing ahead of you. This is very crucial to advancement as it helps to identify personal bests. Which should always be the goal. You may feel like a stage went very well, but in actuality it didn't and with out a comparison to others you may get a false sense of advancement. Shoot your best game and don't worry about anybody else until the scores are posted. Then review the scores to see how you really did. The most important aspect (besides safety) is having fun, and it seems that you have that covered.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-21-2017, 09:17 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Florence, Alabama, USA
Posts: 17,724
It sounds like you have found a "home on the range" which is good.

But
Quote:
The stages were inconsistent in that targets were called on the fly and after the timer beep. Lot’s of moving and thinking, which was excellent. You may have been called the easier targets, or maybe the more difficult ones.
Seems odd and makes scoring competition difficult. Not impossible, but difficult.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:31 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved