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Old 12-06-2019, 04:36 PM
MCinTN MCinTN is offline
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Loop on original magazine from 1917?

I just recently got my 1st 1911 ever, an original Commercial produced circa 1917 via serial number. It is fine condition and shoots quite well, the only thing I do not understand is what this loop is for on the base of the magazine(see pic). I know about the lanyard loop, which is on the base of the grip of the pistol itself. But cannot imagine why a loop would be put on base of the magazine itself-especially after(reflexively)slapping the base of the mag to seat it and giving myself a nice bruise on the heel of my hand the first time I took it to the range!
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Last edited by MCinTN; 12-06-2019 at 04:38 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2019, 05:06 PM
jtq jtq is offline
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It is a lanyard loop.

You didn't want to lose your mags, because that's the way to get more rounds into the gun. They were switching over from revolvers and these magazine things were new.
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Old 12-06-2019, 05:38 PM
MCinTN MCinTN is offline
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Ah, so it is a lanyard loop...But then what's the loop on the base of the grip of the actual pistol for? I am thinking a "lanyard" was the old fashioned thing where a cord/lanyard was used to tie a pistol to ones belt to prevent dropping/losing it on a battlefield, right? Were they thinking individual magazines would also be tied to ones belt and the empties just dangling after use? If so, I can see why common sense/practicality prevailed and the magazine loops disappeared in later models!
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2019, 05:49 PM
jtq jtq is offline
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They are both lanyard loops. One keeps you from losing your gun, the other for your mags.

Think supply chain in the early days. You probably got two magazines and that was it. You didn't want to lose them.

Today, mags are disposable items, and even the typical civilian shooter probably has dozens of them. Probably not the case in 1917.
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Old 12-06-2019, 06:59 PM
markwell markwell is offline
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Think cavalry. The 1911 first saw action in the Mexican campaign. When on horseback both the gun and the mag needed to be secured from loss. You couldn't stop a cavalry charge to pick up your mag. See The History of the Big Bend for photos of the era; Horses, Springfield 03-A3s, 1911s and bi-planes; it was a period of transition to say the least.
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Old 12-06-2019, 07:02 PM
dfariswheel dfariswheel is offline
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Back at the beginning, the military was just horrified at the idea of losing magazines.
They were so budget strapped that they never really considered just making extra magazines available.

They were also highly concerned that the new 1911 was a "two piece pistol" and that if the magazine was lost the gun would be out of service.
A Cavalryman would be at a high risk of dropping and losing magazines in a battle while ducking enemy fire and trying to control a bucking horse, so they had the idea of attaching the pistol and all three magazines with lanyards.

Since the primary user of pistols was the Cavalry, the Cavalry was in charge of developing the new pistol.
They had to also make sure it was usable by the other services and the always conservative Navy also voiced concerns about loosing magazines over the side of a ship or a boat during landing operations.

It soon became apparent that having FOUR lanyards attached to a trooper quickly led to a tangled rats nest of lanyards, so eventually common sense prevailed and the magazine lanyard loops were dropped.
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Old 12-07-2019, 08:14 AM
MCinTN MCinTN is offline
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Thanks for all the replies-interesting historical information, and now I get it. I was looking at it from the modern perspective of magazines being plentiful and cheap!
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