Decision between two options - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-04-2019, 09:08 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
So I'm getting the itch for something new purely for cool factor and am torn between a wood furniture AR15 A1 build or buying an old Winchester .30-30, I am kinda tempted by the lever gun since it would give me something entirely new to learn but the wood AR would be fun to use for the irony factor and showing it to liberals as a "hunting rifle"

Yes this idea was sparked from the spirited debate over an SD rifle in this sub-forum, the lever guns looked cool.....I'm guilty of envy I guess!
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-04-2019, 09:41 PM
Autonomous Autonomous is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,312
ARs' with wood furniture are good for a short giggle and then become just odd.
The 30-30 is timeless.
__________________
There is something to this 1911. I think it'll catch on.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-04-2019, 11:50 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 309
Can do a good ol' Winchester 94 Carbine. This one's in .32 Winchester Special rather than .30-30 which is the obvious better choice between the two cartridges.



These were taken on the occasion when the rifle shot the best 5-shot group ever from the bench rest at 100 yards.




Another group from that afternoon. Was a sight verification trip to the range about this time of year, anticipating taking a deer in November. First time the rifle would have been taken afield in 20 years.


Love old lever-actions. The center fire lever-actions on hand, top to bottom.

Winchester Model 1873 from 1900 in .38-40
Winchester Model 1886 from 1887 in .45-90
Winchester Model 1892 from 1896 in .32-20
Winchester Model 94 from 1941 in .32 Winchester Special
Winchester Model 1895 from 1904 in .405 WCF
A Savage Model 99 from 1956 "snuck" in there, in .300 Savage



All have taken deer except the '73 (but an earlier '73 just like it, same caliber did take a deer) and the Model 1892. Have been sorely tempted to take a deer with it using a .32-20 "high-velocity" hand load.

Last edited by bmcgilvray; 10-04-2019 at 11:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-05-2019, 02:38 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
So of those options what is the easier gun to own? As in parts, maintenance, ammo and all that.......I know nothing about lever guns except older ones are more desirable, what should be inspected before buying
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-05-2019, 03:21 PM
combat auto's Avatar
combat auto combat auto is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 11,387
See if you can get a 44-magnum lever action - it will kick-up the cool-factor :-) and is more fun to shoot (I have a Marlin), was the first firearm I ever purchased in my 20's...No worries with your wrist, the recoil is transferred into the shoulder and no big deal, just fun.

Maintenance? Not much. Clean chamber and bore, swab out the reciever, a little lube, and go. On par with a pump SG as far as effort...I guess I could take it apart further but haven't had a need. Not a high-volume thing for me but I suppose it could be, they have a "Cowboy-Geezer" shoot at my club 2X/month.
__________________
Member: NRA, GOA, ANJRPC, VCDL.
"To be born free is an accident. To live free is a responsibility. To die free is an obligation."-Gen. Halley.
"To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." ĖUlysses
Ekeibolon - Jeff Cooper

Last edited by combat auto; 10-05-2019 at 03:30 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-05-2019, 03:46 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 21,019
If you want to get something good for shooting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Striker2237 View Post
So of those options what is the easier gun to own? As in parts, maintenance, ammo and all that.......I know nothing about lever guns except older ones are more desirable, what should be inspected before buying
And are not really concerned about having an antique. The Miroku made Winchesters are about the best made gun out there. With the Ubertis close in comparison. Either one will serve you well for a long time.

Some people like the Henrys, But I could never warm to them. Late production Marlins are a crap shoot. Some of them perform well, some not. Older Marlins that have not been abused can usually be picked up fairly cheap and are often a good buy.

Older original Winchesters that are clean and tight will be expensive. Examples like what BMC shows will cost you, but certainly have their cool factor. I have a number of them but my late production Miroku copies see most of the action.
Attached Thumbnails
DSC01764.JPG  
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-05-2019, 03:54 PM
Mike 139 Mike 139 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 414
BMcgilvay, You REALLY need to take a trip to Cody to see the Winchester’s. Outstanding collection you have!





The older Winchesters that go up in value are the pre-64s and the 9422s....If you can find a 9422 or 9422M mfg. before 1981,that’s before WRAC took over and they are well built Rifles and fun and economical to shoot, and absolutely go up in value.

You also can look at Marlin’s 39, again the older ones are the ones to buy...They only go up in price if taken care of....The Browning Lever is also a real decent Rifle, though it’s Japanese production instead of Belgian.


As far as what to look for in an older Lever Rifle, carefully inspect the Bore for bulges, rust, etc, check all the screws ,damaged ones indicate someone without the proper tools have messed with it, check the wood for cracks, function test it with dummy rounds ,making sure it feeds and ejects properly...check for cracked but plate, the original hard rubber ones are tough to find, test-fire before purchase if possible making sure everything works and you like it.

When you have it outside, in natural light ,you can see any “touch-ups” or other repairs in the finish and stock.

Last edited by Mike 139; 10-05-2019 at 04:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-05-2019, 04:22 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 309
Depends on how much shooting use a person anticipates.

I'm not the hugest fan of the AR 15, but the AR 15 here's fired far more rounds than all the lever-actions combined.

Of the lever-action rifles on hand, it's the Winchester Model 1892 that's seen far more shooting use than the others. It's a special favorite for jaunts afield on our old family place and for plinking sessions out there at cans, rocks, mesquite stumps, cactus, or other targets of opportunity.

That Savage 99 has seen an awful lot of use in the 40 years I've played with it, developing hand loads. hunted with it, and shooting it for group from off the bench rest just for fun.

Maintenance? I'm fastidious about keeping firearms clean and lubricated. All the lever-actions here were gathered up in the late 1970s to early 1980s except the Model 1886 which was given to me by a dear old friend in the early 1990s and the Model 1873 which is a relatively recent addition, acquired to replace another Model 1873 .38-40 I had years ago which was regrettably sold with a group of guns in order to purchase a collectible car. Mourned it until I could get around to getting another.

Parts? Have never once required any replacement part. The Model 1886 was missing a fore end cap screw when I got it so one was hunted down. These lever-actions were used and some were well worn when I got them, but they have never failed to be dependable and I do use them every one. No cold clammy hands of a collector here. The Browning-designed Winchesters such as the Models 1886, 1892, 1894, and 1895 as well as any derivatives of same are pretty much everlasting if given a modicum of maintenance care. Typical of Browning designs they're well thought out and overbuilt. They may be detail stripped, but I can't say they are a joy to do so. I can accomplish it, but I don't enjoy it. I'm not the most mechanically inclined though.

Ammunition? For big game, the .30-30 is your friend if you don't hand load. For that matter the .30-30 is your friend if you do hand load. I hand load for everything, but .22 rimfire. Don't much fool with shotshell loading anymore. I've played with .30-30 a lot over the years, but don't currently have a lever-action so chambered. I do have a .30-30 chambered bolt-action Winchester Model 54 carbine that's the cat's meow, both for hunting or for accurate shooting from the bench. The .30-30 is both highly effective on deer sized game and economical to purchase. I challenge anyone to realistically differentiate between observed wounds in deer carcasses that were shot with the .30-30 and those shot with even the various .30 magnums. Dead is dead. Good hits are golden and bad hits are just that, bad hits.

Quick story. A deer hunting coworker at a bank were we both once worked shot all his deer with a .300 Winchester Magnum. One season he came to the office fussing that the .300 Winchester Magnum had failed to put down a deer he'd shot that previous weekend. He was going to get something more powerful. Any excuse will do. So he ordered a Ruger 77 in .458 Winchester Magnum. Hey, he apparently wanted one and again, any excuse will do. He took it whitetail deer hunting too and shot one. The big 510 grain slug hit it high in the back, knocking the buck down. It sprang back up though and ran off, leading him on a merry chase in order to recover it. I couldn't help but smirking: "Where ya' gonna go from here pursuing the quest for more power?" These were Texas whitetails and light of body.

Good alternative lever-action choices would be the .45-70 (bit pricey if not hand loaded), and the .44 Magnum. Marlin was the go-to manufacturer for these, but I don't know about the company's current status, both quality or availability.

Gun owning friends have owned Marlin Model 1894s in .357 Magnum and I've been impressed with how punchy such a lever-action carbine can be in that chambering. Many folks love the Henry line of lever-actions. I'm not personally keen on their design and execution but have a brother-in-law who has had great luck with one or two of them.

I'm speaking about used lever-actions of which I am familiar. Companies and their lever-action products have undergone a transformation since the lever-action rifles with which I am familiar were produced. Company names and models may yet appear in product catalogs but with change of company ownership and with the products having required safeties added, different techniques in manufacturing, as well as cosmetic appearance differences, may not have the same feel as the ones from the "olden days."

I'll stick with the oldies if I am to acquire any additional lever-action rifles.

Hah! A scan of an ancient Polaroid of that first Winchester Model 1873 .38-40 on the side of the hill at our old family place at the lake.


A scan of an early(?) 1990s photograph taken in Coke County, Texas with the Winchester Model 1886 .45-90 and black hair (what happened to that?). I think I was looking disgusted because I'd missed a shot at a turkey I'd walked up on earlier in the day.

Last edited by bmcgilvray; 10-05-2019 at 06:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-05-2019, 04:29 PM
bradsvette bradsvette is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South
Posts: 2,550
It's funny you should consider a lever gun because I was thinking the same thing, especially after one of the guys who was arguing against AR-15s posted that video of Chuck Connors/The Rifleman running that lever gun. Chuck rocked that bad boy!!!

I've got a Marlin 30-30 and it's a very nice gun. The fit and finish are outstanding for a very reasonably priced rifle. I'd definitely consider getting another Marlin, but if the quality is inconsistent, then I may look somewhere else. I'd want a 16" barrel, ghost ring and tritium sights, a big lever, smooth action, and at least a 6 round magazine. Does anyone make that?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-05-2019, 04:34 PM
bradsvette bradsvette is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South
Posts: 2,550
Just read bmcgilvray's excellent posts. Great photos too. So I'll have to see if the Marlin 1894 can be configured as I mentioned in my ideal lever gun idea.

Last edited by bradsvette; 10-05-2019 at 08:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-05-2019, 05:33 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
Quote:
Originally Posted by USMM guy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Striker2237 View Post
So of those options what is the easier gun to own? As in parts, maintenance, ammo and all that.......I know nothing about lever guns except older ones are more desirable, what should be inspected before buying
And are not really concerned about having an antique. The Miroku made Winchesters are about the best made gun out there. With the Ubertis close in comparison. Either one will serve you well for a long time.

Some people like the Henrys, But I could never warm to them. Late production Marlins are a crap shoot. Some of them perform well, some not. Older Marlins that have not been abused can usually be picked up fairly cheap and are often a good buy.

Older original Winchesters that are clean and tight will be expensive. Examples like what BMC shows will cost you, but certainly have their cool factor. I have a number of them but my late production Miroku copies see most of the action.
I would actually be more interested in an older one, not mint condition but safe to shoot with modern produced ammo (nothing crazy just off the shelf) since the age and character of the gun I feel is better with older examples.

I was not aware of Miroku at all not that they are the best ones, I would have thought pre-64s would be better
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:01 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 309
Oh, and don't tell the Winchester aficionados (of which I am one), but the Marlin Model 336 is the best "usin'" .30-30 lever-action rifle going, at least the older traditional Marlins. They are much more comfy for extended bench rest sessions and seem to be more generally accurate besides. They take a scope well which can add to utility.

I love ol' Winchester 94s, but the carbines are not my very favorites to cozy up to on the bench rest for any sight verification chores. I'm a fairly big ol' boy at 6'3" and the Winchesters just don't quite fit ergonomically, hence are a bit of a whipping to shoot. They're fine for off hand plinking use

I've never owned a Marlin Model 336, but have shot others' rifles and always found them to be well mannered in every way, more so than my beloved Winchester 94 carbine.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:23 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradsvette View Post
It's funny you should consider a lever gun because I was thinking the same thing, especially after one of the guys who was arguing against AR-15s posted that video of Chuck Connors/The Rifleman running that lever gun. Chuck rocked that bad boy!!!

I've got a Marlin 30-30 and it's a very nice gun. The fit and finish are outstanding for a very reasonably priced rifle. I'd definitely consider getting another Marlin, but if the quality is inconsistent, then I may look somewhere else. I'd want a 16" barrel, ghost ring and tritium sights, a big lever, smooth action, and at least a 6 round magazine. Does anyone make that?
Same here, I'm looking for an older made one that's traditional for some pure enjoyment factor.

Ditto that there have been awesome posts here, gives me a lot to sort through. I had no idea Browning was the one who designed these, I kinda have to have one now knowing that!
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-05-2019, 08:40 PM
Deyomatic Deyomatic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 851
What self-respecting American DOESN'T have a Winchester Model 94?

I didn't read every word in the thread but you'll want to get one made before Winchester started cheaping out in 1964.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-05-2019, 08:40 PM
dsk's Avatar
dsk dsk is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 68,826
The whole pre-'64/post-'64 thing is only important if you're a purist or collector. Yes the first post-'64 rifles with their stamped lifters were crap, but once Winchester woke up and put cast ones in they were fine. I have a 1977 Wells Fargo Co. commemorative that I bought simply because I fell in love with the wood on it. It runs great and is fun to shoot... I'm even finding some fairly inexpensive .30-30 ammo out there nowadays.





__________________
Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-05-2019, 09:45 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 21,019
This is incorrect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Striker2237 View Post
I would actually be more interested in an older one, not mint condition but safe to shoot with modern produced ammo (nothing crazy just off the shelf) since the age and character of the gun I feel is better with older examples.

I was not aware of Miroku at all not that they are the best ones, I would have thought pre-64s would be better
The Mirokus are better rifles, at least inasmuch as shooting is concerned. And if you really want to get into a good lever action rifle. An original one if you so prefer. Price out an original Winchester model 1895 or 1886. These are the real rifles of the day. And an original clean one will be pricey. As for the model 1894s, these are certainly nice guns. I own a bunch of them. However the rifles except for small runs were discontinued in 1926. After that they went to model 94 carbine production only. They are about a dime a dozen. Nothing wrong with them. However you are looking at a sort of rifle that will not safely shoot spitzer type bullets. This mandates a compromise between a pistol round and a modern rifle round. They worked well for many years and continue to do so. It is all about what you want and how deep your pockets are.

I own about a couple of dozen lever guns. From pistol caliber carbines to box magazine fed guns that will BTW shoot spitzer type bullets from box magazines. I like them all. But if I had to cull the herd on them. The last one that I would let go would be the Miroku Winchester model 1895 in 30-06. It is a serious rifle that will serve any conceivable use well. The Browning BLR in .308 That I bought about a week ago would be a strong contender as well.

Let us know what you end up with.
Attached Thumbnails
Old pictures 2276.JPG  
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-06-2019, 09:10 AM
HarryO45 HarryO45 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Home of the Infantry
Posts: 4,510
The Original American Rifle

I cut my teeth with Lever Actions. I started with a M94, it was my Dadís pre 64 that he hand checkered and added a rear Williams peep. Excellent rifle one of my prized possessions. I love to shoot it. Rugged and handy. My dad always told me that the Lever Action was an important weapon for a Rifleman to master. I agree, if you consider yourself a American gun guy you gotta be proficient with the Lever. It is a great rifle... I do not like the cross bolt safety on some of the new ones. I would get one without that redundant safety. .30-30 is a good cartridge as long as you know its limitations. Kill some game with it. You will appreciate the experience.

I didnít own a rifle except for Lever actions until after I was 23 years old. My first non Lever rifle was a Model 70. I was always a 1911 guy. Life is good.
Attached Thumbnails
43F26079-BD22-473B-A442-0A29629581B7.jpeg  
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-06-2019, 09:19 AM
HarryO45 HarryO45 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Home of the Infantry
Posts: 4,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Striker2237 View Post
a wood furniture AR15 A1 build
Reading this made me vomit. Please donít.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-06-2019, 11:24 AM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 21,019
Yea I kind of gagged at that myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryO45 View Post
Reading this made me vomit. Please donít.
Why would you?
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-06-2019, 03:21 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 309
No law out there that compels AR 15s must have black stocks. If a spare AR 15 ever comes my way I might do it.

http://soundsystems.me/furniture/ar-...stock-sets.htm



Looks "right" somehow, but I'm a geezer. Looks like something that might be seen in colonial powers' hands in some late 1950s African unrest.

Last edited by bmcgilvray; 10-06-2019 at 03:23 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-06-2019, 06:14 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
Got it, it's a 1894 .30-30. I have no freaking clue what year this thing is or any idea how it works or if it's safe to use. Bore is 7/10, metal/bluing is in good shape, buttplate is not cracked and seems original, serial range is 3.6 million so I think it's from the 70s. I'm excited and am going to start looking into the design and how to take everything apart fully and what to make sure is in good working order.

Pics to follow soon
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland

Last edited by Striker2237; 10-06-2019 at 06:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-06-2019, 06:44 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 309
Betcha the bore will clean up to be near 10/10. Perhaps some judicious alternate soaking and scrubbing. Perhaps some JB Bore cleaner would help things along. It's certain that shooting and cleaning regularly will improve it.

I had a 1964 vintage Winchester 94 carbine in 30-30. Was produced immediately after the revamped manufacturing. Had an ugly degraded surfaces on the receiver because of the method of plating to achieve some semblance of a blue finish on a what some say is a sintered metal receiver. Had roll pins rather than solid. Felt like tin cans to operate. Was one of the contemptible of contemptibles to Winchester aficionados and collectors. Shot quite well though. Picked up for $60 at a Dallas Market Hall gun show probably in the early 1980s. Had it for years then traded it away. Should have kept it as an example of the utility of even the worst ones.

http://oldguns.net/sn_php/windateslo...le=win1894.dat
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-06-2019, 07:10 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rural VA
Posts: 21,019
I have lever guns going back over a century.

The oldest one that I have, an 1894 Winchester made in 1900 still shoots pretty well. I like all of them for various reasons. I just actually picked up another lever gun last week. A 1993 production Browning model 81 BLR. in .308 Winchester. A contemporary update of the lever action gun with a frame strong enough to handle heavy magnum rounds and a box magazine to allow the use of Spitzer type bullets.

I have been shooting it quite a bit this last week. And the more that I shoot it, the more I like it.
Attached Thumbnails
DSC02624.JPG  
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-06-2019, 07:15 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 6,626
Thanks for the lookup tool, it's a 1972 and I think it's a fairly good deal at $350









I quite like it, gonna be fun to learn about the mechanism and to shoot it. I have some federal deer hunting 150g soft points to try in it Tuesday

EDIT, lord this thing is hard to load. The first round went in easy but the 2nd one had me thinking something was wrong since it required way more force to get it to take the round. Also you can short stoke it, I just found out if you don't fully cycle to can have two rounds trying to both be in the barrel at once. The way the safeties work is also really cool, kinda like a grip safety on a 1911 in that you need to hold the lever closed for the very last bit for the trigger to be unlocked. Really curious design that's unlike any other rifle I've ever owned.

EDIT 2, the rounds hit you in the face if you cycle it when it's still on your shoulder.
__________________
Carry gun(s):Wilson Carry Comp Custom Pocket carry:SIG 938 9mm. Other 1911s:WC Supergrade Accucomp .38 super, WC BW Carry Optics, WC CQB Professional .45, WC Super Sentinel, WC CQB Elite 9mm, WC EDC X9, Ed Brown SR .45, NHC Predator 2 .45, NHC T3 Hardchrome .45, Kimber Ultra .45, STI Escort .45, ATI Tactical .45, RIA Tactical 10mm, Kimber Ultra Diamond 9mm, Detonics Combat Master MKVI .45, Colt Centennial .460 Roland

Last edited by Striker2237; 10-06-2019 at 09:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-06-2019, 09:06 PM
Pedro 1 Pedro 1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Age: 62
Posts: 1,674
Quote:
Striker2237
I quite like it, gonna be fun to learn about the mechanism and to shoot it. I have some federal deer hunting 150g soft points to try in it Tuesday

EDIT, lord this thing is hard to load. The first round went in easy but the 2nd one had me thinking something was wrong since it required way more force to get it to take the round. Also you can short stoke it, I just found out if you don't fully cycle to can have two rounds trying to both be in the barrel at once. The way the safeties work is also really cool, kinda like a grip safety on a 1911 in that you need to hold the lever closed for the very last bit for the trigger to be unlocked. Really curious design that's unlike any other rifle I've ever owned.
I'm happy for you Striker, it was designed by a genius!
Pedro.
__________________
NRA
GOA
NAGR
VCDL
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:05 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved