Will Bullseye training help improve IDPA times/skills? - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-10-2011, 03:38 PM
Joe L Joe L is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: West Texas
Posts: 95
Will Bullseye training help improve IDPA times/skills?

Left shoulder surgery last week, shot one handed (strong side) this morning. Every flinched or jerked shot was very evident shooting one-handed!

If I am able to improve single handed, while the improvement in trigger control carry over to two hand as used in IDPA?

I sure hope so, since I will be shooting single for at least two months.

Joe
__________________
Sig P226/P239, Kahr PM40/CM9, Desert Eagle 1911G
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-10-2011, 03:55 PM
Earlsbud Earlsbud is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Where we know we belong to the land, and the land we belong to is grand.
Posts: 2,666
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe L View Post
Left shoulder surgery last week, shot one handed (strong side) this morning. Every flinched or jerked shot was very evident shooting one-handed!

If I am able to improve single handed, while the improvement in trigger control carry over to two hand as used in IDPA?

I sure hope so, since I will be shooting single for at least two months.

Joe
I bookmarked this recently. There's a lot to sift through while you're healing.

http://www.bullseyepistol.com/
__________________
Grip. Stance. Hold. Sight Alignment. Trigger control, squeeze/press.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-10-2011, 03:55 PM
guysmith guysmith is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 4,137
It might help with trigger control, but that's about all. The firing stance for Bullseye shooting is all wrong for defensive type shooting. So you may have to break some newly learned bad habits. Any trigger time is better than none though. Get well soon, and shoot straight and be safe.
__________________
Be safe and shoot straight.
D&D Bren Ten M&P 45 acp, Mitchell Gold Series '95, S/A Champion SS Loaded, Sig P228, S&W 657 41 Magnum.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 07-10-2011, 05:34 PM
Joe L Joe L is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: West Texas
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Earlsbud View Post
I bookmarked this recently. There's a lot to sift through while you're healing.

http://www.bullseyepistol.com/
Thanks a bunch, I am working through some of their reference material this afternoon, between dry fire, pain medication, and ice!

Joe
__________________
Sig P226/P239, Kahr PM40/CM9, Desert Eagle 1911G
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-11-2011, 07:18 AM
richpetrone richpetrone is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 6,322
Bullseye shooting and IDPA

In order to shoot rapidly with one hand stlye shooting, it is best to keep the elbow and wrist locked to aid in fast recovery of recoil. With proper technique, the shooting arm under recoil will act like someone has a rod placed in their arm so the entire arm moves up like it was fixed in a straight position....no wrist movement and no elbow movement.
I try to use this technique when shooting one handed in IDPA, and it does aid in fast recovery.

IDPA does not use the same stance or technique when shooting two handed. Having a firm wrist is still helpful, but the non shooting hand usually provides about 60% of the grip pressure, while the shooting hand provides 40% grip pressure. This will allow a "tension free trigger finger" for top trigger control. If there is too much grip pressure with the shooting hand, more often than not, a shooter will create tension in the trigger finger, which can cause a loss of tringger control and may lead to jerking and heeling the shot.
When IDPA shooters are required to fire two quick shots (doubletap) often times a shooter may get a good hit with the first shot, then they inadvertently change or increase the grip pressure for the second shot (due to the anticipation of the recoil) which reduces trigger control and the shot strays from the intended POA.

Last edited by richpetrone; 07-11-2011 at 07:23 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-12-2011, 12:48 PM
Joe L Joe L is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: West Texas
Posts: 95
Rich, thanks for the insight. I will shoot again on Wednesday night, can't wait. Both shoulders very sore, however.
Joe
__________________
Sig P226/P239, Kahr PM40/CM9, Desert Eagle 1911G
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-13-2011, 05:08 PM
deathcape deathcape is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: CA
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by guysmith View Post
It might help with trigger control, but that's about all. The firing stance for Bullseye shooting is all wrong for defensive type shooting. So you may have to break some newly learned bad habits. Any trigger time is better than none though. Get well soon, and shoot straight and be safe.
Thats 99% of shooting a shot in the X-ring.
__________________
___________________________________________
zzzzzzzz
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-14-2011, 09:13 PM
jglenn jglenn is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Monroe, Ga
Age: 71
Posts: 466
bullseye

having competed in many pistol sports over the years my years shooting bullseye taught me how to shoot ...period.. then you can go on to other competitions.

nothing like hot brass in your face while you are trying to manage sight picture, breath cpntrol and sight picture.. you will learn concentration

Last edited by jglenn; 07-16-2011 at 07:18 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-14-2011, 09:53 PM
jedi573's Avatar
jedi573 jedi573 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Columbia, Missouri - Birthplace of IPSC, IDPA, and Bianchi Cup
Posts: 1,527
I always recommend to first learn how to shoot consistently and accurately. Then speed it up.

You can't miss fast enough to win.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-18-2011, 12:52 PM
Joe L Joe L is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: West Texas
Posts: 95
So far, shooting (500 rounds) one handed has been very instructive. I have seen trigger motion induced muzzle movement that was not significant shooting two handed. I think this single handed shooting exercise will help me, which is good.

I've also almost ruined a belt and a shirt racking the slides of my pistols single handed by hanging the rear sight on said belt!

Joe
__________________
Sig P226/P239, Kahr PM40/CM9, Desert Eagle 1911G
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-18-2011, 12:54 PM
mikeg1005 mikeg1005 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe L View Post
I've also almost ruined a belt and a shirt racking the slides of my pistols single handed by hanging the rear sight on said belt!

Joe
Don't shoot yourself.

MIke.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-01-2011, 02:18 PM
Grizzly Adams Grizzly Adams is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe L View Post
So far, shooting (500 rounds) one handed has been very instructive. I have seen trigger motion induced muzzle movement that was not significant shooting two handed. I think this single handed shooting exercise will help me, which is good.

I've also almost ruined a belt and a shirt racking the slides of my pistols single handed by hanging the rear sight on said belt!

Joe
Hmmmm.......Saw this quote, attributed to a Marine Corp instructor:

"The 1911 is the safest pistol ever made. It has several positive safeties. It has killed more people accidentally than any pistol ever made."
__________________
If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a Vet!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-03-2011, 07:34 AM
tuj tuj is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 267
I talked with Brian Zins shortly about bullseye shooting and other disciplines. If you're not familiar, he is the 10-time NRA bullseye champion and he came in 2nd on the last season of Top Shot where he showed he was far more than just a bullseye shooter. His take was that bullseye was the hardest discipline to master and if one could do it good, it would translate to everything else more or less.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-03-2011, 10:58 PM
deathcape deathcape is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: CA
Posts: 237
Bullseye can be really frustrating at the standard plateau points: beginner, sharpshooter->expert, and expert->master. I think it's important to have a Bullseye buddy, or a master-level "coach" to keep you positive.
__________________
___________________________________________
zzzzzzzz
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-04-2011, 12:37 PM
Joe L Joe L is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: West Texas
Posts: 95
Thanks for all the replies. I was able to use my left arm some yesterday at the range after 4 weeks in a sling and my shooting has improved dramatically over the last few weeks shooting single-handed. I think trigger control improved. I was able to knock off 2 seconds out of 10 on my own personal three target 9 yard drill going back to a very weak two handed grip. I should be able to compete in an IDPA match in 8 days, using the really weak left arm at least during reloads. This has been a very interesting experiment.

Joe
__________________
Sig P226/P239, Kahr PM40/CM9, Desert Eagle 1911G
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-07-2011, 09:10 PM
Aquanewt Aquanewt is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Baltimore
Age: 64
Posts: 81
Keep us posted.
__________________
"Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges. I don't have to show you any stinking badges."
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-08-2011, 11:05 PM
flyinrock flyinrock is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Gods Country
Posts: 1,604
Joe
I also had shoulder surgery a few years back....torn rotator cuff and bicep muscle detachment. was the most painful rehab I've ever done and that is saying something. It was a hard 6 months before I could reach my rear pocket without excruciating pain and even now it causes pain if my shoulder is cold. Usually wear a t shirt to sleep to keep it warm.
No question that one handed shooting will help ala bullseye for when you go active again in action shooting of whatever discipline. It took some time for me to adapt to the fast and furious vs bullseye but they compliment each other. However, bullseye makes one slow and deliberate while action will take some of that deliberate edge off. If you are shooting at Master level, or in national or international at that level, you have to be careful with practice sessions so they don't interfere with each other. The X ring is unforgiving.
I discovered that I can shoot "weak side" just as accurately but slightly slower when it is required. I learned that while recovering from a shooting in which I took a bullet through my strong hand that nearly severed my ring finger at the knuckle. That was one of 7 bullets that hit me. Now the arthritus in that hand is starting to cause trouble but I no longer shoot in high level competition so its not a factor.
Good luck with your rehab and bringing your shooting skills back up to normal with hopefully steady improvement.
Semper Fi
Rocky - Distinguished Pistol & Presidents 100, former student of J. Cooper and E. Keith among others.
BTW, I learned to rack my slide or hold my 1911 behind my knee while doing a slight squat. It can be very fast and steady. I learned it from a shooter in South Africa who had lost his right arm at the shoulder in an accident.

Last edited by flyinrock; 08-08-2011 at 11:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:19 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved