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  #1  
Old 08-12-2020, 10:25 AM
NCGunz NCGunz is offline
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Starting Reloading

Hey Folks,
I am new to reloading and given the situation with ammo, I have decided to learn and start reloading myself. I realize right now is not going to be good to get supplies as many of them are hard to find. But I plan to start reloading even when things loosen up.

To that end, I would like to gain some information about the supplies and equipment to get to do this right from the get-go.

1. What is the best equipment to buy for quality reloading? (Budget ~$500 - $1,000)

2. What are all of the supplies that are needed? I do not want to tumble casing. I rather buy the casings in bulk and just reload.

Any advice and information around where I should go to purchase the supplies would be greatly appreciated. If you feel more comfortable, please private message me.

Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2020, 10:29 AM
longarm longarm is online now
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For plinking/fun/hunting, once-fired cases in the caliber[s] you enjoy.

I'm fond of Lee Precision dies and presses, as they are quite affordable.

Primers are hard to find today; powders - check your manuals for choices.
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  #3  
Old 08-12-2020, 12:09 PM
Reloader Reloader is offline
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If you are not familiar with the process and equipment, it may be well to first get one of the reloading manuals, Speer, Hornady, Sierra and Lyman, and others, have manuals. They go through the process.

Reading through one (or more) of the manuals should give you a basic grounding allowing better insight to the equipment that suits you.

Some of the questions may include. what quantity of ammunition do you anticipate? Larger volumes pointy to a progressive press. Lesser may be accomplished with a single stage.

You did not mention what cartridge(s) you want to reload. Small primers are very hard to find at present. That's not to say you should not go ahead with equipment, but you may not be able to immediately begin loading.

Do you intend to keep the cases once fired? You state you do not want to clean them. The casing is the most expensive part of a round of ammunition. Even if you do not presently want to clean cases, keep them after firing as you may need to later.
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  #4  
Old 08-12-2020, 12:13 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGunz View Post
Hey Folks,
I am new to reloading and given the situation with ammo, I have decided to learn and start reloading myself. I realize right now is not going to be good to get supplies as many of them are hard to find. But I plan to start reloading even when things loosen up.

To that end, I would like to gain some information about the supplies and equipment to get to do this right from the get-go.

1. What is the best equipment to buy for quality reloading? (Budget ~$500 - $1,000)

2. What are all of the supplies that are needed? I do not want to tumble casing. I rather buy the casings in bulk and just reload.

Any advice and information around where I should go to purchase the supplies would be greatly appreciated. If you feel more comfortable, please private message me.

Thank you.
Buy a loading manual/book and read it cover to cover before proceeding. One like the Lyman 50th reloading handbook is OK and inexpensive on amazon.


1. You should decide what caliber(s) and rifle, pistol or both and some idea of ammo qty's you need, before deciding on a press. You may be fine with a single stage or you might really benefit from a progressive press set up.

2. For loading the ammo- you only need Brass, primer, powder, bullet.
2b. If you forego tumbling and and reloading your brass - to just buy prep'd brass you might as well just buy loaded ammo. Take the $1k you would spend on loading equip and buy a few cases of ammo as back stock and then buy as you shoot. (tough right now but so is finding primers) But if you really don't want to pick up your brass- you can shoot at my home range anytime!

As for equipment & supplies, Brownells/Sinclaire, Midsouth, Natchez, powder valley, midway,Titan reloading, etc. For bullets specifically you should look at the mfrs, like Missouri, Acme, Galant, etc.
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  #5  
Old 08-12-2020, 12:41 PM
Nork1911A1 Nork1911A1 is offline
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Yep, you picked a bad time to want to learn to reload ammunition...just like I did back during the 2013 Sandy Hook aftermath & panic. The only thing easy thing to find during that time were the manual(s) YOU WILL DEFINITELY NEED TO GET YOU STARTED.
That part cannot be emphasized enough.
Buy one, read it cover to cover. Then read it again.
By then, you'll have a pretty good idea on what you will need & where you want to go with your reloading.
Unless you have deep pockets on a repeating basis, I'd suggest you keep the brass cases you have or find.


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  #6  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:03 PM
Viper_29 Viper_29 is offline
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Buying cases or not cleaning what you have is a huge ding in the cost effectiveness of reloading.

...just saying.

Otherwise buy a single stage RCBS RockChucker, the box with the whole kit in it. Don't even think about a progressive until you can master a single stage press and the process. Stick to RBCS die sets...the lock ring is way better than Lee, otherwise the die's are IMHO very comparable to one another.
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  #7  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:08 PM
markm markm is offline
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Yes, buy a book, in fact buy a few reloading manuals as you will use them when you start loading. They usually have chapters in the front that cover the process.

I don't know anybody that reloads that doesn't tumble or otherwise clean brass.

You could buy a starter reloading kit but you'd probably find that before long you have replaced about everything in it.
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  #8  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:08 PM
mikld mikld is offline
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Yep, bad time for factory ammo and components...

Welcome the the wonderful, oft frustrating and confusing world of reloading!
I normally recommend The ABCs of Reloading as a beginner's "how to text", followed by reloading manual(s). Explains the how to, the equipment/tools needed, descriptions and break downs of all components (brass, primers, powder and bullets). Easy to find and easy to read/understand, gives a good, safe base for reloading, and can be referred to as often as needed. Of course there are others but this text is very popular. Once you determine which equipment and tools suit you, reloading manuals are essential. The Lyman Reloading Handbooks are excellent and a bit "generic", including jacketed from different manufacturers and cast bullet load data. Also, get a manual from the manufacturer of the bullets you choose (Hornady, Speer, Sierra, etc). Hint; find a load in your manual before you buy components. Many fewer headaches, time lost searching for data, and no mismatched components...

Go slow. Double check everything. Most important, have fun!

FWIW, I reloaded for 12 years before I got a tumbler. I just wiped each case with a solvent dampened rag as I initially inspected it. No scratched dies, no ruined chambers and I couldn't have cared less is another shooter at the range looked down their nose at my dull brass (brown?) handloads as all functioned perfectly and some were extremely accurate...
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Last edited by mikld; 08-12-2020 at 01:13 PM.
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  #9  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:23 PM
andrew1220 andrew1220 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nork1911A1 View Post
Yep, you picked a bad time to want to learn to reload ammunition...just like I did back during the 2013 Sandy Hook aftermath & panic. The only thing easy thing to find during that time were the manual(s) YOU WILL DEFINITELY NEED TO GET YOU STARTED.
That part cannot be emphasized enough.
Buy one, read it cover to cover. Then read it again.
By then, you'll have a pretty good idea on what you will need & where you want to go with your reloading.
Unless you have deep pockets on a repeating basis, I'd suggest you keep the brass cases you have or find.


Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
Same here. I bought my Hornady LNL AP press the day after Sandy Hook. Luckily I had been gathering powder but I never gathered any primers...That took awhile
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  #10  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:25 PM
mikld mikld is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markm View Post
Yes, buy a book, in fact buy a few reloading manuals as you will use them when you start loading. They usually have chapters in the front that cover the process.

I don't know anybody that reloads that doesn't tumble or otherwise clean brass.
.
A thought; About the time I started reloading I went to a police range and just watched the shooters. There were two guys shooting 1911s and they were shooting a lot. I got closer and noticed their ammo was loose in a 30 cal ammo can and it was brown! Mt first thought was "what is this junk they're shooting?". Got closer and notice their retrieved targets, with a few magazines shot at each target, had one hole about 2"-3" centered. One guy noticed me and started talking and he told me they were reloaders. Their ammo may not have looked purdy, but it sure as heck was accurate and functioned 100%. But of course this was way pre web and before newer reloaders were taught "shiny/glossy brass is essential"...
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Last edited by mikld; 08-12-2020 at 01:27 PM.
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  #11  
Old 08-12-2020, 03:34 PM
Twoboxer Twoboxer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGunz View Post
Hey Folks,
I am new to reloading and given the situation with ammo, I have decided to learn and start reloading myself. I realize right now is not going to be good to get supplies as many of them are hard to find. But I plan to start reloading even when things loosen up.
Given what you say below, it's hard to understand why you want to get into reloading. When reloading supplies loosen up, so will ammo supplies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGunz View Post
To that end, I would like to gain some information about the supplies and equipment to get to do this right from the get-go.
This cannot be answered in a single post on a forum. It also cannot be PROPERLY answered without knowing what and how much you plan to reload.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGunz View Post
1. What is the best equipment to buy for quality reloading? (Budget ~$500 - $1,000)

2. What are all of the supplies that are needed? I do not want to tumble casing. I rather buy the casings in bulk and just reload.
The "best" equipment depends not only on your budget, but on the calibers you plan to reload and their volumes. Doing significant volumes of popular pistol (and sometimes rifle) calibers may "require" a progressive press, which fully adorned can take up most if not more than your budget. Most consider precision rounds and low-volume reloading are best done on a single stage press. Turrets can be an in-between step, especially for pistol rounds, medium volume. NONE of those recommendations apply in all cases.

Not cleaning brass cannot be addressed when prices are skewed by shortages . . . which occur every election year now. Under "normal" pricing, using brass one time only is cost prohibitive. If you can get the brass through normal channels, you can get the ammo too. Why waste all the investment, space, and time in reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGunz View Post
Any advice and information around where I should go to purchase the supplies would be greatly appreciated. If you feel more comfortable, please private message me.

Thank you.
Where to buy depends on what and when. So if you want serious advice on reloading, provide the caliber(s), purpose, and volumes of each you think you will reload.

And reconsider your decision to not clean brass. There are several methods of cleaning brass besides tumbling, but cleaning and re-using brass is the primary reason reloading exists, and is called what it is
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  #12  
Old 08-12-2020, 04:18 PM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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1) As others have said, buy a reloading manual first.
2) Read the manual cover to cover.
3) Decide if reloading is right for you.
4) If you still do not want to tumble your brass:
. A) Sell your book on EBay
. B) Burn your book
. C) Continue to buy all of your ammo at retail.......
5) If you realize the 75% savings by using the fired casings, get out your credit card and go shopping!
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  #13  
Old 08-12-2020, 04:41 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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I got the impression that he wasn't planning to use picked up, dirty brass but instead to buy new or used "processed" clean brass to load. ie: he wants to load purchased components only, not pick up brass/prep/clean brass/sort/etc.
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  #14  
Old 08-12-2020, 04:46 PM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Ezactly......pretty much defeats the purpose
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  #15  
Old 08-12-2020, 04:55 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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Originally Posted by mikld View Post
But of course this was way pre web and before newer reloaders were taught "shiny/glossy brass is essential"...
Why throw shade? It's not essential, just cleaner and healthier. This has been discussed over and over... shiny brass is but a by product of clean brass. Many of us wet tumble for health, lead and general cleanliness concerns... I load in the house, the last thing I want is any of the post shot dust & debris in my office.


Sure, some people wet tumble for the glossy brass- but why does that bother you? Just because it was done another way for many years doesn't mean the old way is better. I suspect you use [some] modern equipment and tools.
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  #16  
Old 08-12-2020, 06:08 PM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is offline
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I’m going to flip this a bit. Ive accumulated a lot of various once fired brass from cleaning up after myself where I shoot. I’m not ready to go head first into reloading, yet.
Calibers of brass i have are: 9mm, 38 super, 45 acp, 357, 44 sp/magnum, 22-250, 6.5 creedmoor, 270 Winchester, 308.
What would I need to prep/tumble de primer the brass to make it ready for reloading?
Thanks in advance.

Btw: is it worth doing vs taking to the scrap yard?
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  #17  
Old 08-12-2020, 06:47 PM
15roundsof9 15roundsof9 is offline
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@Plantar

Don’t take your brass to the scrap yard! You can sell it as cases for more.

For tumbling, you need an electric tumbler, crushed corn cob or walnut ‘media’ that scrub the cases and tumbling wax. Clean waxed cases are easier to manipulate on the press. You can tumble all your brass and store until ready to load. In my somewhat younger poorer days I used to crank out 100 rounds (or more? I forget) of 45acp on a Lee single stage in 2hrs. Saving my cases again and this time will go with Dillon 650.

And you don’t need to remove primers, they’re removed in the process of loading.

In normal times it cost about half as much to shoot reloaded than factory ammo. 9mm even cheaper because you use even less powder and small pistol primers used to cost less than large ones. But you can’t gun for maximum savings, cheap powder burns dirty, so you have to balance costs and ‘shootability’. I have to say it is a significant time investment, I would go through about 800 rounds of reloads a week between practice and matches and free time was tumbling / loading / practice. Progressive press is the way to go.

Last edited by 15roundsof9; 08-12-2020 at 07:08 PM. Reason: more info
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  #18  
Old 08-12-2020, 07:08 PM
flechero flechero is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plantar5 View Post
Iím going to flip this a bit. Ive accumulated a lot of various once fired brass from cleaning up after myself where I shoot. Iím not ready to go head first into reloading, yet.
Calibers of brass i have are: 9mm, 38 super, 45 acp, 357, 44 sp/magnum, 22-250, 6.5 creedmoor, 270 Winchester, 308.
What would I need to prep/tumble de primer the brass to make it ready for reloading?
Thanks in advance.

Btw: is it worth doing vs taking to the scrap yard?
Don't take it to the scrap yard!! You'll get pennies on the dollar. You can sell it here (dirty or clean) for way more than scrap, if you don't want it.

I don't think I'd clean it for storage if you aren't ready to start loading anytime soon... just bag it in the box or bin you are storing it in. You'll probably want to clean it before you reload it vs loading cases from garage or shed storage.

To clean, you'll need a wet or a vibratory tumbler. I too, started keeping and cleaning brass before I started loading... bought a little 2 drum harbor freight rock tumbler with a bonus coupon and some SS pins online and was all in for well under $50. I had a couple thousand cases ready to go the day my press arrived.
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Old 08-12-2020, 07:38 PM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is offline
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Thanks 15rnds,

Good suggestions. I could clean and separate the pistol and 5.56 (which i forgot to mention), Are all co mingled and get it more organized. The rifle casings are already separated. So, dont worry about de priming right now...
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  #20  
Old 08-12-2020, 07:48 PM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is offline
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Originally Posted by flechero View Post
Don't take it to the scrap yard!! You'll get pennies on the dollar. You can sell it here (dirty or clean) for way more than scrap, if you don't want it.

I don't think I'd clean it for storage if you aren't ready to start loading anytime soon... just bag it in the box or bin you are storing it in. You'll probably want to clean it before you reload it vs loading cases from garage or shed storage.

To clean, you'll need a wet or a vibratory tumbler. I too, started keeping and cleaning brass before I started loading... bought a little 2 drum harbor freight rock tumbler with a bonus coupon and some SS pins online and was all in for well under $50. I had a couple thousand cases ready to go the day my press arrived.
Thanks. Understood. I stopped scrapping more than a year ago. I thought it would be good to start separating it and at least clean the co mingled brass. The rifle brass is clean, separated and in their boxes. Iíd have to decide what calibers obviously to load.
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  #21  
Old 08-12-2020, 09:13 PM
Vos Parate Vos Parate is offline
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There are a lot of reloading videos on YouTube. Watch them to supplement your manual.
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  #22  
Old 08-13-2020, 04:51 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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Learning how to reload ammunition.....

Many people suggest purchasing a reloading manual, but I disagree. Most reloading manuals offer excellent data for reloading, but not all reloading manuals go into detail on "how to reload."

I would recommend a book called "The ABC's of Reloading" by Dean Grennell.
This is an old publication, but is still available on-line at websites that sell used and new books.... Amazon sells this book for $15.95.

The book shows excellent photos, and detailed instruction on how to reload for pistols and rifles. It does not supply data for reloading, which is what reloading manuals are for......however, there are websites, like Hornady, that offers free reloading data:

https://www.hornady.com/support/load-data/

Many companies that manufacture gun powder have free websites for reloading data with their powders.

I like and use Vihtavuori gun powders, and use their free website:

https://www.vihtavuori.com/reloading-data/
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  #23  
Old 08-13-2020, 06:38 AM
Plantar5 Plantar5 is offline
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Is there a consensus or preferences on what tumbler? I was looking at a few ie Frankford arsenal,hornady.
Also, wet or dry?
Thanks.
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  #24  
Old 08-13-2020, 06:55 AM
EL Perdido EL Perdido is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plantar5 View Post
Is there a consensus or preferences on what tumbler? I was looking at a few ie Frankford arsenal,hornady.
Also, wet or dry?
Thanks.
I prefer dry and use a Thumler's vibrating tumbler with walnut lizard litter.
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  #25  
Old 08-13-2020, 07:02 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Oh boy! Youíre in for it now!!
The dry media vibratory cleaners are probably the most simplistic and easy to use. Then you have wet tumble and ultrasonic. All come with increasing costs and time. I switched to a wet tumble after decades of the vibratory ONLY because I was bored and wanted to try something new. It kept the dust down and was fairly easy.
You will now be pelted with 100 different opinions (good thing).
Keep it simple to start with....just get a small vibratory cleaner and some corn cob and buzz away......itís perfectly effective!
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