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  #51  
Old 07-10-2020, 07:00 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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Progressive Dillon presses.......

I have and use three progressive presses: Dillon 550 set up for small primers, Star Machine set up strictly for .45acp, and a Dillon 1050 set up for 9mm. At one time I did most all of my reloading on my D550, but upgraded to the D1050 after the first year they went on the market. I have been very pleased with my D1050.

My D550 is my "work horse." I make small batches of various calibers, and do new load development on my D550. I have 6 tool heads with Dillon powder measures for various calibers....all for small pistol primers: .380, .38 special, .38 super, .40 S&W, 9mm, and .223. One tool head is to reload for .300 Win Magnum rounds for my hunting rifle, but since this uses large magnum rifle primers, I do all my case prep work, and rather than switch out the small primer assembly to large primers, I use a Lee Ergo prime to load the large magnum rifle primers in the cases, then trickle charge the cases for the exact powder charge, then finish reloading the rounds on my D550. I don't shoot my .300 Win Mag too often, so I only make about 15 rounds at a time. My load will shoot sub MOA at 100 yards, using Sierra 168 gr. Match Kings, but even with a full recoil pad on the butt stock, it is not pleasant to shoot too many rounds in practice....
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  #52  
Old 07-10-2020, 07:36 AM
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Grandpas50AE Grandpas50AE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavelamb View Post
I might ask, if you wouldn't mind some time, to show me how it runs?
That would take a lot of guess work out of setting one up.
Can do.
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  #53  
Old 07-10-2020, 07:59 AM
f1racefan f1racefan is offline
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I'm guessing you guys wanting tight tolerances on powder drop and OAL are shooting bullseye or something?

As I mentioned, I've been using a Lee Pro 1000 for about 9-10 years and 10,000+ rounds. At the beginning of a run, I test about 4-7 powder drops using a beam scale to see that it's consistent. If it is, I start running. As far as OAL, I think I stay within .010. I've just never worried that every single round was perfect in regards to some spec I'd set. For me, they all go bang and my loads have all shown good accuracy in accurate pistols.
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  #54  
Old 07-10-2020, 09:25 AM
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RetiredRod RetiredRod is offline
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Originally Posted by Grandpas50AE View Post
Can do.
I'm running 9's on my 550 right now. Switched over from .38 Special last week. Cavelamb, you'll love it.
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  #55  
Old 07-10-2020, 10:18 AM
JamieC JamieC is offline
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Originally Posted by cavelamb View Post
Lots of Dillon guys, but we haven't heard from a Lee Loadmaster user?

Anybody?
I've got one, bought it for cheap, had a lot of upgrade parts. I'm a mechanic, sounded like a good challenge, the price was right. No question there are reasons more than a few hate them, to be honest, more than once I've started the 'blue' preliminary search. Large primer, (45acp), I've had practically no problems. Small primer, 9mm, that HAS been a struggle at times. Recently got everything adjusted and working right, over 1,000 rounds, two squashed primers. Getting the height of the primer ram is CRITICAL for smooth primer feeding. Some filing of the primer ram and a set screw for adjustment make for success. Yes, that could change in an instant, but for now, it works just fine. Part of MY initial issues with was getting used to watching EVERYTHING. Watch the primer feed, make sure the primers move down one every time a case goes by, that catches things before too many problems pile up. Also makes sure the primer tray isn't empty. Make sure the 'flippers' are tight and keeping the cases pushed into the shell disc. I've got several thousand rounds loaded and in boxes from this press. At some point, if money permits, I will look into a Dillon, 550b, just to say I know for a fact the differences.
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  #56  
Old 07-11-2020, 10:37 AM
alamogunr alamogunr is offline
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Originally Posted by BrokenGrunt View Post
The June issue of the Dillon Blue Press has an article about precision loading on a Dillon. This article covers how accurate the Dillon powder measure is.

Everyone should read this article. The June issue should be available for download soon.

The July issue covers OAL variation. It's going to knock the socks off of a lot of people.
Where do I find the downloads of Blue Press? I do receive it but I receive a lot of various magazines and Blue Press is one that I sometimes trash before I have read all the articles.
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  #57  
Old 07-11-2020, 12:12 PM
Pariah Zero Pariah Zero is offline
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Originally Posted by alamogunr View Post
Where do I find the downloads of Blue Press? I do receive it but I receive a lot of various magazines and Blue Press is one that I sometimes trash before I have read all the articles.

Blue Press Online
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  #58  
Old 07-12-2020, 09:54 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Originally Posted by Rwehavinfunyet View Post
I have and use three progressive presses: Dillon 550 set up for small primers, Star Machine set up strictly for .45acp, and a Dillon 1050 set up for 9mm. At one time I did most all of my reloading on my D550, but upgraded to the D1050 after the first year they went on the market. I have been very pleased with my D1050.

My D550 is my "work horse." I make small batches of various calibers, and do new load development on my D550. I have 6 tool heads with Dillon powder measures for various calibers....all for small pistol primers: .380, .38 special, .38 super, .40 S&W, 9mm, and .223. One tool head is to reload for .300 Win Magnum rounds for my hunting rifle, but since this uses large magnum rifle primers, I do all my case prep work, and rather than switch out the small primer assembly to large primers, I use a Lee Ergo prime to load the large magnum rifle primers in the cases, then trickle charge the cases for the exact powder charge, then finish reloading the rounds on my D550. I don't shoot my .300 Win Mag too often, so I only make about 15 rounds at a time. My load will shoot sub MOA at 100 yards, using Sierra 168 gr. Match Kings, but even with a full recoil pad on the butt stock, it is not pleasant to shoot too many rounds in practice....
I ended up using a strap on pad in addition. It’s not my fault that my buddies get bit by the scope from crowding the relief area! It is fun to let it go at the range under a tin roof with unsuspecting benchers! Most everybody smiles, except the guy that was working on his scope and screws are now on the ground!
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  #59  
Old 07-14-2020, 01:18 AM
Bowdrie Bowdrie is offline
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Generally, the ammo that gets jacketed bullets is done on the Rock Chuck, the lead SWC practice/play stuff gets loaded on the Dillon SD.
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  #60  
Old 07-14-2020, 05:56 AM
johnnyreloader johnnyreloader is offline
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I've been using a Hornady LnL AP for 5+ years now. Last time I loaded 9mm, turned out 1,000 rounds of high quality, safe 9mm ammo in 2 hours, 9 minutes.
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  #61  
Old 07-14-2020, 07:02 AM
OS1880 OS1880 is offline
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I recently got the Lee Progressive Pro 1000 still getting used to it. It's the first progressive I've had. It works fine for me I can do 100 rounds 45 in 10 mins maybe that's slow but keeps me out of my wife's hair. The only problem I see is with the add on bullet feeder it's fine for purchased jacketed bullets but cast bullets won't work to well they are a few thousands to tall, which I found to be odd since the mold I used was a Lee mold.
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  #62  
Old 07-14-2020, 09:08 PM
bbqncigars bbqncigars is offline
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I'll setup my LNL AP for a particular cartridge when the number of loaded rounds on hand is less than 200. Then all the spent brass gets loaded until another cartridge needs replenishment. I have >1000 rounds/brass for most of what I shoot. A primer tube filler is a real help for extended loading sessions. Currently working my way through the rest of 2000 .22TCM in 1 hour lots.
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  #63  
Old 07-15-2020, 05:59 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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Progressive presses.....

One of the ways I use my D550 is for developing new and accurate ammo. This is important to competitive shooters! When I first started shooting Action Steel matches, I used my 9mm Major load. However, after talking with the guys that were good shooters, they all used light bullets with their 9mm guns at low velocities, and usually 100 gr. bullets. I then purchased 95 gr. bullets, and worked up a load that shoots very good in my STI 2011 9mm gun. The 95 gr. bullets with a light powder charge allows less muzzle lift, and faster recovery to shoot faster splits on the rectangular steel plates.

I really don't enjoy reloading, since for me, it is simply an end to a means. I enjoy shooting and competing, so reloading is necessary to help keep the costs down. However, the bonus is, I can fine tune the loads through reloading for different competitive shooting games!

Some people use the Lee Pro 1000. Unless they have changed the design, the tool head would only allow 3 dies, so it demanded seating the bullet and using a slight roll crimp, since there was no place to use a taper crimp die...or add more time and effort by using a taper crimp die as a separate operation. A Lee Progressive 1000 might be OK for making revolver cartridges, but a taper crimp die is best for optimal accuracy with semi auto rounds....

For anyone planning to purchase and reload on a progressive press, I would recommend the tool head should allow the use of four stations for four reloading dies.....

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 07-15-2020 at 06:08 AM.
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  #64  
Old 07-15-2020, 06:49 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatanka View Post
After ten years loading pistol on a Square Deal, I bought a 650 for my rifles.

I've never owned a single stage press, the closest I've owned to a single stage is a Redding T-7.

Insisting someone learn on a single stage press won't make them a better reloader, but it might frustrate them enough to drive them out of the hobby.

I wouldn't do that to anyone. But if someone decides to start reloading with a Dillon machine, I can certainly help them get into the game.

Reloading isn't about rounds per hour, but, like having a lot of money, it's a lot more fun than the alternative.
Oh, I don’t know about the “not starting with a single stage” angle. Most of us did, simply because of economics, but you quickly tire of it. By one step at a time, you learn why you have to force primers in some cases and not others, you figure out why you are crushing cases. You also know why not to seat and crimp in the same step....until you figure it out. It teaches all of the intricate steps along the way. Concentrating on powder charge, reading and re-reading to make sure you are right is priceless. Or, you can just jump in the pool. Neither way is wrong, but a mini bike is a good first start before a YZ250!
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  #65  
Old 07-15-2020, 09:43 AM
BrokenGrunt BrokenGrunt is offline
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Saying someone should start with a single stage press to learn reloading is like saying they should start with a single shot firearm to learn shooting.
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  #66  
Old 07-15-2020, 10:22 AM
flechero flechero is online now
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Originally Posted by Nitro.45 View Post
Oh, I don’t know about the “not starting with a single stage” angle. Most of us did, simply because of economics, but you quickly tire of it. By one step at a time, you learn why you have to force primers in some cases and not others, you figure out why you are crushing cases. You also know why not to seat and crimp in the same step....until you figure it out. It teaches all of the intricate steps along the way. Concentrating on powder charge, reading and re-reading to make sure you are right is priceless. Or, you can just jump in the pool. Neither way is wrong, but a mini bike is a good first start before a YZ250!
It didn't take too much research to figure out that a 550 was the better starting point for me. (and better use of my hard saved funds) I bought a manual and read it cover to cover a couple times before even researching presses. I have a mechanical background so nothing in there was magical... actually knowing how use and read a mic and set of calipers made the rest pretty easy.

You can run singles through the 550 and "learn" the stages just fine. Likewise, you can hand weigh and add powder when you advance to station 3. (and I did initially) I have since bought a few single stages but I loaded on a 550 for a year or more before I loaded anything on a SS.


**I think the instant availability of info is the biggest change...Back when most guys here started loading, the internet was not there... I was able to watch videos and see detailed pics & read dillon forums/1911 forums/reloading forums of potential pitfalls before I ever decided on the right press.

25-30 years ago- I too, would have started on a single stage because I wouldn't have know I could jump right in safely and easily. I also learned to drive on a stick shift... it wasn't necessary, it's just what my father had at the time.

apologies for drift- just wanted to add this here, referencing to Nitro's comments
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  #67  
Old 07-15-2020, 10:51 AM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Running 100 rounds in 15 minutes is not 400rds per hour. Why not asks the group?

Because of fatigue. Because of errors and mistakes. Because you can't keep up that pace for an hour and make 100% good product. Think not?? Sit down for an hour and crank away. After 60 minutes......see what you've got in terms of good rounds.

400 an hour on a 550? Not on your Granny's grave.
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  #68  
Old 07-15-2020, 11:04 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Originally Posted by flechero View Post
It didn't take too much research to figure out that a 550 was the better starting point for me. (and better use of my hard saved funds) I bought a manual and read it cover to cover a couple times before even researching presses. I have a mechanical background so nothing in there was magical... actually knowing how use and read a mic and set of calipers made the rest pretty easy.

You can run singles through the 550 and "learn" the stages just fine. Likewise, you can hand weigh and add powder when you advance to station 3. (and I did initially) I have since bought a few single stages but I loaded on a 550 for a year or more before I loaded anything on a SS.


**I think the instant availability of info is the biggest change...Back when most guys here started loading, the internet was not there... I was able to watch videos and see detailed pics & read dillon forums/1911 forums/reloading forums of potential pitfalls before I ever decided on the right press.

25-30 years ago- I too, would have started on a single stage because I wouldn't have know I could jump right in safely and easily. I also learned to drive on a stick shift... it wasn't necessary, it's just what my father had at the time.

apologies for drift- just wanted to add this here, referencing to Nitro's comments
I agree...the 550 can be used as a SS and even has a reverse gear. You shove a newb in front of a Super 1050......well, you can probably do that too.
All I could afford was a SS with one set of 357 dies, a powder dipper, funnel, scale and a hand primer. That was a long time ago, information was limited, and all the old timers taught that way.
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  #69  
Old 07-15-2020, 11:06 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
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Originally Posted by BrokenGrunt View Post
Saying someone should start with a single stage press to learn reloading is like saying they should start with a single shot firearm to learn shooting.
Precisely how it was done for generations! Little Johnny does not need to learn on a Mac 10. Slow is the course, watch that damn muzzle son!!
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  #70  
Old 07-15-2020, 11:12 AM
GySgt 7291 GySgt 7291 is offline
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Originally Posted by TRSOtto View Post
Running 100 rounds in 15 minutes is not 400rds per hour. Why not asks the group?

Because of fatigue. Because of errors and mistakes. Because you can't keep up that pace for an hour and make 100% good product. Think not?? Sit down for an hour and crank away. After 60 minutes......see what you've got in terms of good rounds.

400 an hour on a 550? Not on your Granny's grave.
I never have loaded on my 550 for speed but I have occasionally checked how long it took to load 100 rounds.
If you have enough primer tubes filled 400 is very possible +/- a few minutes. Under normal circumstances and in no hurry 100 45s take 12-13 minutes. As for fatigue at 67 I'm not there yet, there's just not that much resistance loading 45s and only slightly more with 9mm. I also never sit while operating the press, I use the strong mount and like to see into the casings as I seat a bullet.
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  #71  
Old 07-15-2020, 12:45 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Originally Posted by GySgt 7291 View Post
I never have loaded on my 550 for speed but I have occasionally checked how long it took to load 100 rounds.
If you have enough primer tubes filled 400 is very possible +/- a few minutes. Under normal circumstances and in no hurry 100 45s take 12-13 minutes. As for fatigue at 67 I'm not there yet, there's just not that much resistance loading 45s and only slightly more with 9mm. I also never sit while operating the press, I use the strong mount and like to see into the casings as I seat a bullet.
So run it for an hour at your "no hurry" pace.

Repetitive motion fatigue has nothing to do with age. This is Industrial Engineering 101. Run it for an hour. You will not get 4x what you run in 15 minutes.
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  #72  
Old 07-15-2020, 01:31 PM
GySgt 7291 GySgt 7291 is offline
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Originally Posted by TRSOtto View Post
So run it for an hour at your "no hurry" pace.

Repetitive motion fatigue has nothing to do with age. This is Industrial Engineering 101. Run it for an hour. You will not get 4x what you run in 15 minutes.
I have done it for that long and more no problem, never bothered to count didn’t feel it was necessary. If we asked the group I’m pretty sure they’d say one of us is a pompous ass.
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  #73  
Old 07-15-2020, 02:17 PM
cavelamb cavelamb is offline
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Originally Posted by TRSOtto View Post
So run it for an hour at your "no hurry" pace.

Repetitive motion fatigue has nothing to do with age. This is Industrial Engineering 101. Run it for an hour. You will not get 4x what you run in 15 minutes.

No argument with you, Otto.

But in that same hour I make 50 rounds..
Same effort.
Different results.
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  #74  
Old 07-15-2020, 04:11 PM
Kevin Rohrer Kevin Rohrer is offline
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Originally Posted by BrokenGrunt View Post
Saying someone should start with a single stage press to learn reloading is like saying they should start with a single shot firearm to learn shooting.
This is apples and oranges. Going slow w/ a single-stage press IS the safest way to learn reloading.
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  #75  
Old 07-15-2020, 07:22 PM
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I use the Lee turret as well, I also use the Hornady digital powder measure, I get in a rhythm and can load up 50 pretty quick, if I ain't feeling it the amount loaded drops but I still enjoy the process. All those fancy machines everyone talks about sound great but I enjoy what I use and it is paid for and if I tear something up it costs me shipping. I am good with that. I can see a competition shooter needing to push out a lot more than what I do but for my 50-300 ish +- a week depending on how many of my kids (growed up but still my kids ) show up to shoot ,it is all good.
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