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  #1  
Old 08-11-2020, 09:50 PM
1911Momo 1911Momo is offline
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1911 Finish

This question is going to show my ignorance.

If you removed the finish on a 1911 down to the raw steel frame and polished it, do you have to coat it with something after that? Will it stay shiny with no coating?
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  #2  
Old 08-11-2020, 10:09 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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No ignorance in an honest question!

Carbon steel will rust-- quickly in most environments. So some protection, coating or other, such as blueing, is quite essential.

Stainless steel resists corrosion, so with a little care, it can be left unfinished.

Aluminum is a different matter. Aluminum can oxidize, but the oxidation process tends to stop at the surface, not going deeper. But it needs to be treated, as any quality manufacturer will do.

Just a quick answer, not going into any great detail. Polishing a surface -- just the polishing itself -- doesn't do much to prevent future corrosion, although it might remove small traces of pre-existing corrosion.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 08-11-2020 at 10:21 PM.
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  #3  
Old 08-11-2020, 10:12 PM
BBBBill BBBBill is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911Momo View Post
This question is going to show my ignorance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
No ignorance in an honest question!
^^^ This. Everybody has to learn some thing some where some time.
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  #4  
Old 08-11-2020, 10:24 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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^^^

And a few weeks ago, you graciously gave me a much improved understanding of magnetic characteristics of stainless steel. +1911.
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  #5  
Old 08-11-2020, 10:30 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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Trivia: USFA sold a single action in naked steel, the China Camp model.
The only ones I saw were not rusty, but they were definitely darkening in some areas. Apparently going over directly to black iron oxide in areas not regularly rubbed by holster or heavy hand contact.
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  #6  
Old 08-12-2020, 12:04 PM
1911Momo 1911Momo is offline
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Im still confused. I saw a business recommended in one of the threads for gun polishing. He’s polishing all sorts of guns to a mirror finish. So, how do they not rust? Is there a clear coat?

One is Patriotgunpolishing.com. It looks like many of the guns pictured there are Carbon Steel.

Thanks for the help.
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  #7  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:20 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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The stuff I see in Patriot Gun Polishing advertisements is either stainless, aluminum, or nickel plated. I bet the guns he shows a before picture in black or blue are plated after the high polish.
You could call him up and ask him if he polishes CM steel bare bright or uses a clear coat or plating.
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  #8  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:30 PM
roaniecowpony roaniecowpony is online now
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If good care is taken, a bare steel (in the white) gun can stay rust free. Not a carry gun, but a safe queen. My father-in-law had a prototype P-38 bare gun from the 30s without rust.
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  #9  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:37 PM
roaniecowpony roaniecowpony is online now
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Originally Posted by 1911Momo View Post
Im still confused. I saw a business recommended in one of the threads for gun polishing. Heís polishing all sorts of guns to a mirror finish. So, how do they not rust? Is there a clear coat?

One is Patriotgunpolishing.com. It looks like many of the guns pictured there are Carbon Steel.

Thanks for the help.
You can find people providing all kinds of services. Not all are great ideas.
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  #10  
Old 08-12-2020, 02:01 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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Originally Posted by roaniecowpony View Post
You can find people providing all kinds of services. Not all are great ideas.
Amen to this^^^^.
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  #11  
Old 08-12-2020, 02:07 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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Originally Posted by 1911Momo View Post
Im still confused. I saw a business recommended in one of the threads for gun polishing. He’s polishing all sorts of guns to a mirror finish. So, how do they not rust? Is there a clear coat?

One is Patriotgunpolishing.com. It looks like many of the guns pictured there are Carbon Steel.

Thanks for the help.
Extreme high quality polishing can be done -- and usually is done -- for reasons other than corrosion/rust protection.

For example, the aesthetic quality of a blued finish (on carbon steel) is very closely related to the quality of preparatory polishing undertaken immediately before the blueing.

So someone providing such polishing services might well be very good...and thus quite rightly be recommended by others. But it, in the scenario I've described, is not for purposes of being, in itself, a final finish. Instead, it is an intermediate step towards achieving a certain end result.

On the other hand, if the polishing work is bring performed on stainless steel, then typically that is the final "finish". But even on stainless steel, such mirror-like polishing work is usually undertaken for aesthetic reasons, not for protection against corrosion. It offers no added corrosion protection than does bead-blasted stainless steel. (Some might even argue less, as a bead-blasted surface might, in theory, be fractionally superior in retaining an oil residue).

----

Especially from a photo alone, I'm not sure that many people could discern the difference between highly polished carbon steel and highly polished stainless steel. I know I could not.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 08-12-2020 at 03:41 PM.
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  #12  
Old 08-12-2020, 04:14 PM
RexipusRex RexipusRex is offline
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Not to mention a mirror-polished stainless gun part will get scratched if you just look at it funny.
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  #13  
Old 08-12-2020, 06:00 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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Not to mention a mirror-polished stainless gun part will get scratched if you just look at it funny.
Indeed. That type of finish is often reserved for safe queens...and white gloves handling.
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  #14  
Old 08-13-2020, 10:45 AM
1911Momo 1911Momo is offline
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I found this from One of a Kind industries.

http://www.oneofakindindustries.com/faqs.html

Caring for your polished firearm is a very important step to keeping it in good condition. Do not use abrasive rags or materials to clean the surface. A microfiber cloth, along with your choice of gun oil, is all that is needed to clean and protect the polished surfaces. Moisture is the enemy of bare steel. Take care not to store a polished gun in a moisture rich environment without wiping the firearm down (to remove body oils) and an oil coating for protection (just like blued finishes).*
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  #15  
Old 08-13-2020, 11:03 AM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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While no one could disagree with that vendor's advice, it is wise to remember that a 1911 has many "inside" surfaces...these are susceptible to corrosion in the same manner as the outside visible surfaces that the vendor recommends for care.

Oftentimes, the most corrosion-prone areas of a 1911 are the steel surfaces underneath the grip panels and serrated or checkered surfaces...which collect sweat and aren't so easily wiped with an oil/silicone cloth.

IOW, a carbon steel gun with no treatment or coating is very likely to show corrosion in some places -- and soon -- even if polished exterior surfaces are kept well oiled.

If someone really wants to go for a bare/raw carbon steel surfaced gun (no coating, no blueing, etc.), I'd suggest first trying it with a gun that doesn't make a big dent in the bank account.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 08-13-2020 at 11:06 AM.
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  #16  
Old 08-13-2020, 12:03 PM
JPB 3 JPB 3 is offline
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need a frame cut

Any idea who might be accepting work such as a frame cut ?

Have a frame I'd like to have cut for a C/P ramped barrel..

Any help would sure be appreciated.
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  #17  
Old 08-13-2020, 10:04 PM
1911Momo 1911Momo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
If someone really wants to go for a bare/raw carbon steel surfaced gun (no coating, no blueing, etc.), I'd suggest first trying it with a gun that doesn't make a big dent in the bank account.
I have a $500 SA Mil-Spec brand new still, but sitting in pieces. Bought it to play with. See how it all worked.

Thanks for the input. Appreciate it.
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  #18  
Old 08-14-2020, 04:26 AM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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I the days of yor’ gun surfaces were jeweled or engine turned. Purpose was to create many tiny reservoir for protective lubricant. It wound stand to reason a less than polished exterior texture would serve a similar function. If I were to go through the labor, or pay for it, to polish carbon steel, the bluing would be the surface protectant. There is much to said for a good blued gun.
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Last edited by Magnumite; 08-14-2020 at 06:40 AM.
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