Pandemic Quick fix for satin finish on Stainless Steel. - 1911Forum
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  #1  
Old 05-17-2020, 05:13 PM
warp2diesel warp2diesel is online now
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Pandemic Quick fix for satin finish on Stainless Steel.

Normally, I would just bead blast the part. But with the pandemic, I am not making trips out to get new supplies unless I am desperate. I had to file down a big flaw the slide on my 9 mm Recon Commander on a Urban Survival arms 80% 7075T6 frame. First, you make sure there is no grease or oil on the part. Place a piece of quality fine sandpaper over the portion of the part that has the damaged satin finish.

Repeat until it matches up and you get rid of the buff. Not as good as a good bead blast, but the buff will not stick out like a sore thumb.

Last, clean up so none of the grit gets into your pistol.
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  #2  
Old 05-17-2020, 07:47 PM
partsproduction partsproduction is offline
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Yep, been doing that for years now. Your's is the first mention of it I've seen in print. One only needs to be careful of grit size and blending it in by ever decreasing the weight of impacts as one gets farther away from the area needing it.
The real problem with bead blasting is when there is a polished plane adjacent to the BB area, and that's why I started using this trick.
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  #3  
Old 05-17-2020, 07:56 PM
warp2diesel warp2diesel is online now
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Years ago, I worked for an Engine distributor and there was an engine damaged in shipping. Some of the cast aluminum parts had scuff marks on them. I got some big grit emory and a hammer. A few min later I was done and did not have to turn a wrench to replace the aluminum parts. One of the Sales Guys found a new home for the engine the next day.
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  #4  
Old 05-17-2020, 08:42 PM
drail drail is offline
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Why did you show us a picture of this repair being done on the left side of the slide and then show us a picture of the right side of the slide? Don't we get to see the actual repair?
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  #5  
Old 05-17-2020, 08:56 PM
twistedtippet twistedtippet is offline
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Pictures appear to be of 2 different guns. Check out the trigger guards.
tt
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  #6  
Old 05-17-2020, 09:54 PM
Jason D Jason D is offline
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I picked up a couple pre lock Smiths recently, that had some marks in the bead blasted finish. The sand paper trick does work very well.
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  #7  
Old 05-17-2020, 11:50 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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I once bought a stainless Colt Series 70 with some damage to the front end in the matte area from being dropped. I filed away the raised metal, then took some 80-grit sandpaper and my plastic bullet puller and began to carefully tap away until the damage was no longer visible. Worked perfectly. Like partsproduction said you have to try and match the grit of the sandpaper to the finish you're trying to repair.
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  #8  
Old 05-18-2020, 07:57 AM
warp2diesel warp2diesel is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtippet View Post
Pictures appear to be of 2 different guns. Check out the trigger guards.
tt
Yup, I forgot to take a before pic of the slide I fixed and hitting the sand paper with the small hammer. Showing the technique is what counts.
I did get rid of some scuffs on the second slide, but the photo does not show up as well.
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  #9  
Old 05-18-2020, 08:11 AM
Dave Hoback Dave Hoback is offline
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Yeah, I think the OP done pulled the old “Switch-a-roo” on us here! Boy I hate that.
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:18 AM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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I've done that a couple times. I have read of a texturing technique of place a file on the intended surface and rapping it with a hammer. It is referred to a matting, IIRC. I tried it on a smooth mainspring housing once. A heavy vise and some fixturing to prevent collapsing spaces could be in order.
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Old 05-18-2020, 01:10 PM
NoExpert NoExpert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnumite View Post
I've done that a couple times. I have read of a texturing technique of place a file on the intended surface and rapping it with a hammer. It is referred to a matting, IIRC. I tried it on a smooth mainspring housing once. A heavy vise and some fixturing to prevent collapsing spaces could be in order.
Some files are better than others. I had a file snap into when rapped like that. Others have been fine.
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Old 05-18-2020, 01:24 PM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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Yes, hardened steel...twank!
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  #13  
Old 06-10-2020, 09:05 AM
Shach Shach is online now
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A nice trick for future use, spot-on comment about feathering it in as you move away from the major area of damage.Just like paint repair on a car.
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