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  #1  
Old 12-04-2011, 02:33 PM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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What Parts for Smoother Trigger Pull

Could someone point me to photos/links of what parts and where they should be honed for a better, less gritty trigger pull? Obviously the sear and hammer notch should be checked into but would there be anything else worth eying as well? I have several hard stones but have never worked on the 1911 trigger before.
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  #2  
Old 12-04-2011, 04:10 PM
dsmdylan dsmdylan is offline
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polish the sides of the trigger bow
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  #3  
Old 12-04-2011, 04:44 PM
Raymond759 Raymond759 is offline
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If you will polish the trigger bow, then polish the trigger track (in the frame) as well.

Ray
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  #4  
Old 12-04-2011, 09:49 PM
crashoverrideplik crashoverrideplik is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond759 View Post
If you will polish the trigger bow, then polish the trigger track (in the frame) as well.

Ray
That's good advice.I find that most of the grittyness of a trigger comes from the trigger track.
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  #5  
Old 12-05-2011, 09:53 AM
Raymond759 Raymond759 is offline
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Brownells makes a trigger track stone, but I've simply cut a sliver of wood to the right dimentions and glued some sandpaper to it and use that with a few strokes to smooth out the track. Be sure to blow out the shavings and lubricate the track slightly.

Ray
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  #6  
Old 12-05-2011, 10:56 AM
Ben H Ben H is offline
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TR Sear Jig

I've been using the TR Sear Jig from Chuck Warner with great results. When it comes to the grit/creep, etc. found in the hammer/sear relationship I have been 100% successful in obtaining super crisp/glass rod type trigger pulls. This is dependent on having a sear that is long enough to be able to cut the radius in the jig. Follow Chuck's very well written instructions and you won't be disappointed. log man did an excellent write-up on the TR jig awhile back that is well worth reading.

Good luck,
Ben H
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  #7  
Old 12-05-2011, 12:04 PM
Ronbo256 Ronbo256 is offline
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ColColt, I can highly recommend the EGW ignition set if your frame will accommodate the ball head disconnector, if not you can still get the EGW hard sear, it's the best sear made regardless of price, I usually just polish the face on my jeans after checking the fit, but they are ideal candidates to use With the Chuck Warner TR sear jig. The Cylinder and Slide, Wilson Bulletproof, and Nowlin sets are excellent also. The others that mention polishing the trigger bow and trigger track are correct also, a lot of the gritty feel comes from tooling marks left in the trigger track or burrs on the trigger bow.
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  #8  
Old 12-05-2011, 01:28 PM
flea57 flea57 is offline
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I really like the ignition kits from Dave Berryhill. Great steel, CNC cuts for a very nice 90 degree cock notch (polished). The sear has both angles already cut. However, because of the hammer and sear holes in the frame can be off, they all still need to be checked.
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  #9  
Old 12-05-2011, 01:33 PM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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The external pin set for checking hammer-sear mating is a good investment.
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  #10  
Old 12-05-2011, 01:53 PM
Earlsbud Earlsbud is offline
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You'll need magnification, and a blue felt tip pen to see what you are doing. Polish the disco. Some can be really rough. A ball end strut can help alot too.
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  #11  
Old 12-05-2011, 07:51 PM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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Trigger track...never thought about that one. I have several hard stones from medium to extra fine and are smooth as glass for that purpose that would probably work well.

However,..."ignition set, TR Sear Jig, external pin set, disco..." you guys totally lost me with these terms. I've never heard of them before and wouldn't have an idea where to look for them.
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  #12  
Old 12-05-2011, 07:59 PM
kurmudgon kurmudgon is offline
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TR sear jig info in this thread,
http://www.1911pro.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=824
sorta long, but worth the read.
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  #13  
Old 12-05-2011, 08:22 PM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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The ignition set from EGW shows their out of stock and to "select another item".

This may well be over my head. I've always hated to start a project and not know exactly what I'm doing.
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  #14  
Old 12-05-2011, 08:37 PM
hogrider05 hogrider05 is offline
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Take a look at Harrison Design.

http://shop.harrisoncustom.com/categ...ets-parts.aspx
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  #15  
Old 12-05-2011, 09:27 PM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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I guess I don't follow what these parts will do for you that some fine honing and polishing with what you have won't do. Is it because they're of a better grade of steel and polished more? I would surmise you'd still have to hand fit them and that's where I would come up short never having done that before...at least not that far. I've taken an Arkansas hard stone to disconnector, triggers and full cock notches before but nothing drastic-just to remove any burrs or rough edges-never actually having to hand fit parts that weren't already there. Seems a little daunting if you haven't done that as you won't know if they all fit and work together as is. I doubt they'd be a simple drop in although that would be nice.
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  #16  
Old 12-05-2011, 09:39 PM
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The better parts allow you to cut the steel easier. This allows you to match the sear to the hammer easier and cut a relief angle easier. Easy to cut makes your work accurate and precise. The better you match the sear angles to the gun, the better your work lasts.

Stock parts can be tuned, but it takes more time to do a lesser job and often it won't last.

Beyond parts is finding every moving point and making smooth.

I have the Ron Power jig and Kuhnhausen books.
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  #17  
Old 12-06-2011, 08:45 AM
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As already mentioned, polishing the trigger bow track in the frame, but remember to do this in the area of the frame opening where the trigger sits and rides. Those little burrs on that frame opening edge will make the trigger pull feel gritty.
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2011, 09:08 AM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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"Stock parts can be tuned, but it takes more time to do a lesser job and often it won't last."

Not true. Tuned many stock parts and the trigger job was great and lasted many 10k rounds
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  #19  
Old 12-06-2011, 10:19 AM
Nathan Nathan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnumite View Post
"Stock parts can be tuned, but it takes more time to do a lesser job and often it won't last."

Not true. Tuned many stock parts and the trigger job was great and lasted many 10k rounds
I stated that based on my actual results with MIM SA parts. I got it down to ~5lbs, but it never felt quite right and the hammer hooks were tooooooo short. In addition, the parts were slightly out of spec, had mold release marks, etc. So, I did it. It worked, but it was more of a learning experience than an actual usable product. Then add trigger track files and an EGW hammer and sear, voila, great trigger job.

I forgot to say. . .stock Colt parts and probably other in spec forged or cast parts can be made into a 4 - 5 lb pull that lasts.

BTW, in addition to the Kuhnhausen Manuals, I like this link:
2.5lb Trigger Pull It can easily be adjusted to a ~4lb pull with a 23lb mainspring and sear spring tuning. The method is spot on though.
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Last edited by Nathan; 12-06-2011 at 10:21 AM.
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  #20  
Old 12-06-2011, 10:46 AM
OnTarget1911 OnTarget1911 is offline
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The Brownells tutorial is great but

It also depends on several hundred dollars of equipment and stones. I have several trigger/sear jigs and the Powers jig is worth every penny. I have also developed my own "mantra" for trigger/hammer prep. I don't cut the hooks any shorter than .020, but that is me. If you are going to learn how to do your own triggers, then it might be worth investing in the tools. And the parts can make a difference. If I am going to take the time to do a trigger and someone is paying me to do it, then I replace the MIM parts. Every time. And I also became a fan of the EGW parts years ago. It is all I use. I don't understand though why Brownells stopped stocking the set. I have used the Marvel jig with good results but not nearly as predictable as the Power jig. The only use for the MIM stuff is to practice on and then when you get that down, you can switch to the good stuff. And I am NOT a believer in "drop in" trigger/ignition kits. I have had to recut ALL of the drop in kits I have ever installed.

On another angle, one of the spots that I find grittiness that I think a lot of people overlook is the plunger hole in the MSH. If the plunger hole where the spring and plunger for the hammer spring rides has burrs or grumbles in it, it can also contribute to the crummy feel of the trigger when cocking and dry firing. I always polish this area doing the plunger hole and plunger parts, along with checking the spring for snags and burrs. Also, don't forget to polish the areas where the 3 leaf spring contacts other parts. Some people also polish the sides of the hammer, I don't. Check the sear, safety pin and hammer pin for smoothness and no snags. Polish as needed.

You will not get a good trigger without working on the sear/hammer interface/fit. As stated here, the best sear jig you can afford and a set of external pins to see the engagement outside of the gun are the best start.

Jess
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  #21  
Old 12-06-2011, 11:23 AM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan View Post
BTW, in addition to the Kuhnhausen Manuals, I like this link:
2.5lb Trigger Pull
That Jack Weigand link is really good. He favors getting the disco and sear legs to contribute equal tension, which is easy to remember.

Between the Kunhhausen manuals, Jack Weigand's article, and BigJon's thread, a person can start to put it all together.
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  #22  
Old 12-06-2011, 02:36 PM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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SA Trophy Match, stock MIM parts, crisp 3.25 pound release. Was consistant for lots of rounds. I understand upgrading parts, no problem, I do also, love selecting the upgrades. But some blanket statements are misleading. Good action jobs are done and give good service life with MIM parts.

As far as jigs, stones and fixtures, amen to that. I wouldn't do without for action work.
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  #23  
Old 12-06-2011, 04:56 PM
ColColt ColColt is offline
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I bought the Kunhhausen manual many years ago but it was too technical for me back then as most of the equipment he showed-especially in Part 2 I had never heard of or seen before. It seemed the book was mostly written for someone already versed in pistol smithing although there were many parts that I benefited from.

How to you know how to mate the sear/hammer relationship unless you have one of the jigs mentioned or can that indeed be done? I wouldn't know if the sear hooks were too short or long.

Since the EGW ignition kit wasn't available, I did look at the Harrison and the specs and description of parts were impressive. With current knowledge all I could do would be to drop them in and hope they'd fit. I'm not looking for a 2-3 pound trigger, 4 1/2-5 would be fine with no gritty feeling and smooth pull without creep.
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  #24  
Old 12-07-2011, 07:23 AM
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
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A good set of dial calipers will allow you to measure the dimesions specified. I haven't used a kit since I do my action work, but as others have indicated several out there work as 'drop in' for lack of a better term. Getting a clean pull in the weight you dedire shouldn't be a problem. Harrison does have attractive sets - attractive in function as well as aesthetics.

For what it is worth, sometimes the cost of a matched set, such as Cylinder and Slide's in frame proven set is cost effective against a gunsmith performed action job, or close enough to be viable. Look at the Harrison and C&S sets and make a choice. Its all good stuff.
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  #25  
Old 12-07-2011, 10:56 AM
Raymond759 Raymond759 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColColt View Post
I'm not looking for a 2-3 pound trigger, 4 1/2-5 would be fine with no gritty feeling and smooth pull without creep.
From my perspective, which may not be universal, a smooth and creep free trigger pull at 5lbs feels about the same as a 3lb pull and is probably a whole lot safer!

Just my 2 cents for free,

Ray
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