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  #1  
Old 11-20-2019, 06:00 PM
squid8286 squid8286 is offline
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Scope Mounting Torque Values

I have an old (1966) Remington 700 BDL 30-06 that I have owned for years and never fired. Getting ready to mount a scope on it and get it up and running. In the past, when mounting scopes, I just guessed at the torque, which has always worked pretty well, but I got a Wheeler Engineering Torque Wrench a few years back, and want to get it exact. What would the correct torque be for the base, and would it be any different for the rings themselves?
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  #2  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:10 PM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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Searching torque values will result in numerous answers. To “get it right” I suggest you research by brand/model which you did not provide.
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  #3  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:19 PM
squid8286 squid8286 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STORM2 View Post
Searching torque values will result in numerous answers. To “get it right” I suggest you research by brand/model which you did not provide.
The mount is a standard two-piece steel Weaver brand with a dovetailed front ring and a rear that sits between two opposing lock screws.
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  #4  
Old 11-20-2019, 09:33 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Weaver offers a Redfield-type mount now? Interesting.

In the good old days, we tightened those until the Allen wrench spun out,
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Old 11-20-2019, 09:38 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Here you go -
http://www.weaveroptics.com/resource...rque_specs.pdf
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  #6  
Old 11-20-2019, 09:59 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Generally speaking, if you buy a quality scope today.

They will give you the correct torque specifications. And with the outfits that are really on the up and up. They will give you different values based on what rings you are going to use.

I purchased a click type torque wrench from Snap on some years ago. It has long since paid for itself. They now sell a cheaper line of dial to torque spec wrenches that I am not all that enamored of.

You pays your money and you takes your chances.
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  #7  
Old 11-21-2019, 04:15 AM
STORM2 STORM2 is offline
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My hats off to the OP. How refreshing when someone seeks a technical answer, invests money to assemble proper tools and makes the decision to “do it right”. Everyone of us has in some distant time, hostile environment or war zone begged, borrowed or stolen what was needed to get the job done. We did what was necessary and tell tales today of broken airplanes, bailing wire and bribery. Those methods are fine when necessary but most of us are able to preclude those mandatory options today. Once you have used that perfect gun screwdriver, heard that torque value reached or retrieved that special tool for a once three handed task, you understand the term “the right way”. Just like there is no such thing as too many guns, there are never too many tools, light, magnification or too much bench space. When the bench/s start looking like a crime lab with a Snap-On franchise and library it gets really fun. Don’t forget an apron, it makes you look smarter and qualified to repair anything for your wife which will deflect her questions about the money spent on your gun surgery suite.

Last edited by STORM2; 11-21-2019 at 07:34 AM.
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  #8  
Old 11-21-2019, 08:20 AM
M-Peltier M-Peltier is offline
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Two things to keep in mind is that the scope ring/base manufacturer may have a recommended torque value, but the rifle manufacturer also may have a different torque value for the drilled and tapped receiver. Look up both and go with the lower value. Also, pay attention to the difference between inch pounds of torque and foot pounds of torque. My son learned the hard way on a scope install after breaking off a screw using foot pounds when the value was actually inch pounds. Blue locktite is your friend when used properly.
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  #9  
Old 11-21-2019, 12:50 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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This is a good point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by M-Peltier View Post
Two things to keep in mind is that the scope ring/base manufacturer may have a recommended torque value, but the rifle manufacturer also may have a different torque value for the drilled and tapped receiver. Look up both and go with the lower value. Also, pay attention to the difference between inch pounds of torque and foot pounds of torque. My son learned the hard way on a scope install after breaking off a screw using foot pounds when the value was actually inch pounds. Blue locktite is your friend when used properly.
Generally speaking the spec for your bases to the receiver will be higher for a couple of reasons. Additionally you are not likely to cause any damage by going high here whereas too high on your rings can damage your scope. Loctite is indeed your friend, just make sure to completely degrease your screws in Acetone or something similar before installing.
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  #10  
Old 11-21-2019, 04:22 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-Peltier View Post
Two things to keep in mind is that the scope ring/base manufacturer may have a recommended torque value, but the rifle manufacturer also may have a different torque value for the drilled and tapped receiver. Look up both and go with the lower value.......
Torque values are always specified for the screw and never for the drilled and tapped hole....... because you can't torque a hole......
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  #11  
Old 11-21-2019, 05:01 PM
M-Peltier M-Peltier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRSOtto View Post
Torque values are always specified for the screw and never for the drilled and tapped hole....... because you can't torque a hole......
But you can still strip one. LOL
I doubt this is always true, Im sure aluminum 22 receiver torque specs are based on the threads in the receiver.
I have seen far more stripped holes in .22's than broken screws.
Seen a handful of stripped steel receivers also, but mostly broken screws.
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Last edited by M-Peltier; 11-21-2019 at 05:27 PM.
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2019, 05:23 PM
squid8286 squid8286 is offline
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I appreciate everybody's input. I have always had decent results just guessing when it was "tight enough," but I bought this little torque wrench a couple of years ago, and I figure I might as well do it right. I have done some ham-handed crap to a few firearms over the years, but over-torquing a scope mount hasn't been one of them. Well, I don't include those aluminum "see thru" mounts I bought at K Mart years ago. I busted them in pretty short order. You DO get what you pay for. Thanks again.
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  #13  
Old 11-21-2019, 06:48 PM
SA Inc SA Inc is offline
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65 inch lbs
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Old 11-21-2019, 07:37 PM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA Inc View Post
65 inch lbs
Umm, nowhere near that, according to Weaver's posted specs.
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  #15  
Old 11-21-2019, 09:43 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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65 inch lbs

Quote:
Originally Posted by SA Inc View Post
65 inch lbs
This will not make you very popular with many scope manufacturers. Changing a tire is one thing, mounting a scope is another thing entirely.
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  #16  
Old 11-22-2019, 06:25 AM
SA Inc SA Inc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.E. View Post
Umm, nowhere near that, according to Weaver's posted specs.
I have a Leupold T handle pre set torque wrench its set for 65" lbs will check it against an inch lb torque wrench to confirm.
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Old 11-22-2019, 08:19 AM
L.E. L.E. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA Inc View Post
I have a Leupold T handle pre set torque wrench its set for 65" lbs will check it against an inch lb torque wrench to confirm.
To confirm what? Weaver's published specs are 35 inch pounds.
I looked around a bit, sounds like you may have Leupold's wrench for their Mark 4 base and rings. The OP doesn't own anything like that, SA.
L.

Edit. - I looked even more. That 65 inch lbs. is for the cross bolt that hold the rings to the base, not for the smaller screws that hold the bases to the rifle, or the ring caps.

L.
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Last edited by L.E.; 11-22-2019 at 08:28 AM.
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  #18  
Old 11-23-2019, 10:39 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-Peltier View Post
But you can still strip one. LOL
I doubt this is always true, Im sure aluminum 22 receiver torque specs are based on the threads in the receiver.
I have seen far more stripped holes in .22's than broken screws.
Seen a handful of stripped steel receivers also, but mostly broken screws.
True Dat. Rugers torque specs for mounting a rail to a 10/22 receiver are 12-15 in-lbs...... about half what a steel receiver would be.
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