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  #1  
Old 07-17-2019, 10:48 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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Heat survival

The scenario: dangerous heat wave and the grid crashes. No AC or fans, maybe community cooling centers/swimming pools have auxiliary power, but maybe not.

What are you going to do? What if there are young children/elderly in your care?

Something similar happened to us years ago. We had to bug out but fortunately there was cooler weather 150 miles away on the coast.
What if 400 miles or more is what it takes to get out of the hot zone?

FWIW there were no accommodations available so we just camped out in the blissfully cool fog until arrangements could be made for the babies to stay with grandparents in another, cooler town. By that time the AC was working again.

My lesson learned: My camping kit is my survival kit.

Last edited by John Joseph; 07-17-2019 at 10:51 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-17-2019, 11:23 PM
bs1911 bs1911 is offline
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Society survived in a non air conditioned world up to 100 years ago. I think I can make it a few days...
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  #3  
Old 07-17-2019, 11:53 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bs1911 View Post
Society survived in a non air conditioned world up to 100 years ago. I think I can make it a few days...
On this continent, the native people were mostly nomads, but that was long before we became acclimated to HVAC and started dwelling in paved cities.
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  #4  
Old 07-18-2019, 06:53 AM
Fizz Fizz is offline
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You might want to put some salt tablets in your camping kit. I remember pouring concrete day after day in Texas when they had heat wave warnings. Long days. We drank a lot of water and ate salt tablets. Our blue jeans would turn white just below the knees from all the salt that would leach out of our bodies. Some elderly folks died but maybe their time was up and they would have died anyway. I am not acclimated to handle the heat now and hopefully never will be again. Maybe I would sit somewhere with a cooler full of water to dip my shirt and hat in until the heat wave was over.

Last edited by Fizz; 07-18-2019 at 07:04 AM.
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  #5  
Old 07-21-2019, 11:14 AM
Icecream Icecream is offline
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Not belittling your post just saying.

What is dangerous heat wave? I visited my grandparents farm in the mid south and no AC, no electric for a fan and cooked on a wood fire stove, water pump outside (cool water though) and worked a farm. Lived into the 80s as did my great grandma on the same farm. I asked my mom how they did along with her, she said they just did it.

We just went through record setting heat in June and we do not have AC in homes, a few do with a window unit. Inside our house it hovered 96f with dead air for weeks (norm avg temps mid-high 60s) parts of the area actual hit over 100f. Wildfires were blazing choking the air to include inside the house all June, still do on days.

Three deployments to the desert, first one we had no AC, fans, electric just big green tents in the sand and temps were 110f or so.

Drink lots of water and limit time exerting energy and direct sun.
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  #6  
Old 07-21-2019, 12:29 PM
The War Wagon The War Wagon is offline
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Wink

Me & Blinky got the Three Rivers to swim around here in - we're cool.

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  #7  
Old 07-21-2019, 01:48 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Remember this and you will be fine.

Never let yourself get too far away from the ice cream stand.
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  #8  
Old 07-22-2019, 12:54 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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But, but... what if they run out of your favorite flavor?



Like the others said... stay hydrated and find shade. Taking care of infants and the elderly will be tough... but so it was back in the 1800s as well. We have modern medicine and our cushy technological conveniences to thank for reduced infant mortality rates and greater life expectancy. Lose that and we're back to the way things were 100 years ago.
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  #9  
Old 07-22-2019, 02:41 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
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A personal anecdote re heat stroke.

Some years ago I was out on the range building a catch pen, about 5 acres +/-
Got started early in the morning before sunrise and had plenty of drinking water (even a 625 gallon stock tank) and of course a wide brimmed hat.
I took regular water breaks but at 1:00pm, about when I'd planned to knock off for the day the brush started to look, well, green.
I knew darned well it was dried brown and figured I needed to get out of the sun.
I dunked my head in the stock tank to cool off and
by the time I got to the truck the landscape looked like an old sepia toned photograph.
I put the truck's (excellent) AC on max and started down the dirt road towards the hospital but developed tunnel vision so I had the pull over and drank every bit of water I had left, and parked while the 'tunnel' grew smaller and smaller and everything went sepia.
I laid down across the bench seat with the AC vents pointed at me to cool my core temperature.

After about 60 minutes my sight returned and I could drive to get help.

I'm not a Mojave Indian used to living in 120 degree weather. If you are, more power to you but if you're not, consider extreme heat to be a threat worth at least acknowledging.

I didn't have a plan but was fortunate enough to "wing it" to my advantage.
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  #10  
Old 07-23-2019, 12:43 PM
Taxed2death Taxed2death is offline
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Well, a whole-house generator running on natural gas helps when the grid goes down. A backup gasoline generator and a portable AC unit helps if Plan A fails. A house designed to utilize natural ventilation and that is heavily insulated helps if Plan B fails. LOTS of shaded porch area and a swimming pool to cool down in helps if Plan C fails (or if it is just a nice day to hang out in the pool and chill on the hammock).

Lots of water and sports drinks with electrolytes on hand is a must. Salt tablets are a great idea if you are working outdoors in the heat. I've spent most of my life in South Texas where it gets "warm" in the summer and have acclimated to heavy labor in the heat, but I've also pushed things to the limit before and know now that it is WAY better not to do so. Learning the signs of impending heat exhaustion or heat stroke are essential if you are going to live and work in areas where the ambient environment creates the potential, and being smart enough to pay attention to those signs and act on them are an essential survival skill. Killing yourself in your effort to survive tough situations when it can be avoided, or at least minimized, is pretty stupid!
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