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  #1  
Old 11-01-2012, 03:07 PM
1911inMaine 1911inMaine is offline
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I don't get it...

Ok so a knife is a sharp piece of steal, bone, stone or something like that, it's purpose is to either put a hole in something, make 2 or more pieces of something that used to be 1 piece, or to scrape some crap off a piece of material until it looks like you want it to, so why on earth pay hundreds to thousands of dollars for it. I'm not trying to be offensive and I openly admit my ignorance of the subject. What justifies the price of a knife? Is it how long it lasts between sharpening or because it's pretty? I've bought every knife I've ever owned for less than $30 and have never been in a situation where I've said to myself, self you should have spent way more money on a better knife. I also don't get the difficulty with putting an edge on a knife, whetstone, circular motions, and patience always seem to work for me.

All that being said, what the heck am I missing?
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  #2  
Old 11-01-2012, 04:12 PM
Kodadek Kodadek is offline
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I started out with a Buck 110 like a lot of guys did. Unlike a lot of guys I was fascinated by it, same as I was with the little .22 caliber rifle I learned on. To most of my friends it was awesome to have knife for that first week but after that it was something you put in a scabbard on your belt and forgot about.

Well, that same summer I found a knife stand at a flea market and they had foldings knives with CLIPS! Cheap, crappy, but they had clips! Then I started reading about knives, the types of steel, handles materials, liners, locks, manufacturers, all courtesy to that newfangled interweb in the nineties and I started reading about metallurgy, various blade shapes and styles. Started reading about Emersons, CRKTs, Striders, the tactical knife market exploded and I badly, badly, badly wanted them all.

To me it was always more than some sharp bit of steel with a handle and a clip or a sheath that I used to cut things. I don't hold it against anyone who doesn't and certainly most of my friends and family think it's a bit nutty. My next quest is for a Benchmade 970, simply because I want one. If you don't get it there's really no way to make you get it, odd as that may seem.
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  #3  
Old 11-01-2012, 04:16 PM
joszx67 joszx67 is offline
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It's going to be the same with anything....How much are you willing to pay?

Comes down to:
1. Blade material (more exotic, more money).
2. Non blade material (more exotic, more money).
3 Type of build (factory or custom)
4. Exclusivity or supply and demand (production # or brand reputation). etc....Just like the 1911.

Those are some of the things that can drive up prices.

Best regards,

Joseph
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  #4  
Old 11-01-2012, 04:41 PM
MTSCMike MTSCMike is offline
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Knives and guns...It comes down to features and whether the user can appreciate or use those features...or in some cases features you hope you will never need but want them just in case.

If someone can't understand the need for something or the cost associated with making it that way, then they probably don't want or need it. For the "end-o-the-world" crowd, as an example, a knife represents a tool that they will want and need long after guns and ammo have been spent. They are willing to pay for quality, ruggedness, edge holding ability, etc, that many aren't willing to pay for. Some of us more regular folks just seem to be attracted to quality and are willing to pony up for it. Sometimes you can find a bargain priced knife that just performs above all expectations. I've got an old Western folding skinner that I would take with me if the Zombie Apocolypse ever happens. I'd take my Benchmade and Emerson too...
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  #5  
Old 11-01-2012, 09:50 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Buck, Scharade, Case...

I've got a Buck 110 and some others that are just wonderful knives-but they all date from the late '70's and early '80's. I'm not sure the new ones are as well made or well ground. One of my favorites is a little Buck lockback (close to the current Esquire model) pocket knife-Buck has gone to a different blade grind than mine has. There is far more thickness near the cutting edge on the old ones for a much stronger blade.

There are lots of decent and relatively inexpensive still made in the US knives out there, but I don't think that they are made to the same standards they were 30 years ago and that has driven a resurgence in the number of small, high quality knife making outfits.

The sticker price on one of the Bucks hasn't really changed much in the last 25 years or so but a dollar is only worth a third of what it was...something has to have changed!
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  #6  
Old 11-01-2012, 10:31 PM
Kodadek Kodadek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSCMike View Post
Knives and guns...It comes down to features and whether the user can appreciate or use those features...or in some cases features you hope you will never need but want them just in case.

If someone can't understand the need for something or the cost associated with making it that way, then they probably don't want or need it. For the "end-o-the-world" crowd, as an example, a knife represents a tool that they will want and need long after guns and ammo have been spent. They are willing to pay for quality, ruggedness, edge holding ability, etc, that many aren't willing to pay for. Some of us more regular folks just seem to be attracted to quality and are willing to pony up for it. Sometimes you can find a bargain priced knife that just performs above all expectations. I've got an old Western folding skinner that I would take with me if the Zombie Apocolypse ever happens. I'd take my Benchmade and Emerson too...
Well, I'm not an end of the worlder. I just understand an appreciate what goes into something like a Benchmade, Emerson, Strider, or some of the really high dollar custom knives. I willingly buy anything from $40 dollar CRKTs into multi-hundred dollar Striders or Emersons. It's an addiction of sorts but one that I'm happy to pay for so long as I can afford what I buy. Not worried about running out of ammo or zombies but it's sad when the knife clipped in your pocket is worth more than the sum total of your wallet, watch, and cellphone.

Capt Methane, I still have my old 110, I've looked at the new Schrades and the like and it's just sort of MEH. It sounds idiotic but these days a knife, a good knife it just speaks to me and it's not because of the dollar signs attached. I still remember when I purchased that first CQC-7, it was magical. To me a knife has become more than a pointy tool to others that's all it will ever be. Me? I don't just like them, I love them.
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  #7  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:29 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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It's like at home...I'm not going for one of the dang cheap PRC knives that my wife has brought home for some reason. One of the old, battered Chicago Cutlery's from back when they were made in the US, a Cutco (their cheese knife is amazing for anything from cream cheese to the hardest aged cheddar) or one of the Wusthofs...

They hold an edge better and feel better in your hand.

You could get by with just about anything, sure, so spend your money where you want...but when you get a hold of one that is really right you'll know the difference!

Some people are happy with cheap wrenches too, and if you never really use them very much they'll probably get by...but when that nasty, sub-standard PRC screwdriver cheeses out and slips and puts a great big idiot scratch in the finish of your favorite shooting iron or something else you'll begin to understand that there's a difference!
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Last edited by Capt. Methane; 11-02-2012 at 12:34 AM.
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  #8  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:44 AM
GKC GKC is offline
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I understand the question, and I feel the same way. I have always had a few pocket knives, like Case and Schrade, and they always seem to work OK. I've had a couple of them for many years, including one Old Timer. I don't carry a pocket knife anymore...or almost not: I do usually have a small Swiss Army knife with me or near me, since it has so many dandy little tools.

I drive Fords, have Seiko watches, and shoot Colts, S&Ws, and Rugers...I guess I am definitely middle class. I do have two nice leather briefcases (a Hartmann and a Coach) left over from my working days, so I do have a little bit of elegance in my plebeian nature. I used a Cross gold pen, and not a Mont Blanc, though...
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  #9  
Old 11-02-2012, 01:48 AM
La Grenouille La Grenouille is offline
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Many are pieces of art, a lot of time, effort and craftmanship involved in creating them.
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  #10  
Old 11-02-2012, 04:06 AM
camillo camillo is offline
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It's exactly the same as the difference in woodworking hand tools: saws, planes, chisels, etc. Materials and design make a world of difference.
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  #11  
Old 11-02-2012, 05:40 AM
R0CKETMAN R0CKETMAN is offline
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Not sure why you "don't get it" as knives are no different than 1911s. Parts and workmanship...

Quite a bit of difference between a $450 RIA and a 5k+ from Chuck Rogers.
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2012, 07:21 AM
1911inMaine 1911inMaine is offline
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Thanks for explaining. I don't use a knife enough to need more than a sharp pointy piece of metal I reckon. For rocketman I'll probably end up with a $450 ria just because I don't shoot enough to need a $5k+ gun from some dude named chuck who I don't know. All in all I don't reckon that if I have to use a gun or knife for self defence the bad guy isn't really gonna notice the difference or care much.
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Sardius Industries 9mm
12 gauge single shot
Soda straw with chewed up paper (my first projectile weapon)
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2012, 08:03 AM
Jeff in Colorado Jeff in Colorado is offline
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I bought a knife a year or so ago, not really knowing what it was quality wise. I mean, I could tell it was nicely make, and the person wanted fifty dollars. I told them I would pay half of that because I'm just not really into knives and even advised this person they may get a better price from someone more in the know. Turns out I got a pretty good deal on a benchmade. I was told it was a great deal actually. I used it some and you know what, it's a great knife, probably well worth the fifty she wanted and maybe more. I can sure tell the difference between it and a twenty dollar knife. So, I reckon if it wears better, lasts longer, is stronger, the bad guy won't care how much I paid but I might.
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2012, 08:49 AM
BuffetSlayer BuffetSlayer is offline
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A good quality well made knife can last a long time like my Buck 303 I got in '83. Back in '92 I bought an SOG Recon Government. I almost didn't buy it because I thought it cost too much. But it was cool so I got. Ever since then I take it with me on every hunting, fishing and camping trip. Spending a lot of time on my grandparents farm growing up taught me the value of a good knife.
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  #15  
Old 11-02-2012, 08:51 AM
1911Paul 1911Paul is offline
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I guess it is easy enough to take the cheap stuff and call it functional; whether you are talking about "bullet-launchers" or "pig-stickers".

But all are not alike in more ways than what makes them similar. There is a "second kind of cool" that many of us appreciate with both knives and guns.

Specifically on the topic of knives; the manufacturing materials used to make the knife make a big difference in price. The precision of fitment, blade balance, blade posture (tip, sharpening angle, shape) are easy to compare and the better knives have much better endurance when put to use.

I can sit down and process (probably) a whole cord of wood using my faithful KA-BAR next to anything you grab from WallyWorld that will most likely disappoint you in a very short time.

Just saying......
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  #16  
Old 11-02-2012, 09:17 AM
US1911 US1911 is offline
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Truth is, a $25 china made knife would probably meet or exceed most folks' EDC needs. But, like every tool made; some use better materials, purposely profiled blade designs, specific edge grinds, tighter tolerances and better overall fit & finish. These attributes typically translate into an increase in efficiency; be it better slicing characteristics, smoother blade deployment, positive lockup and most importantly, reliability. There's additional costs associated with a premium crafted product; especially when you factor in the warranty and support.

Is it worth it? Can a $400+ folder be justified? Well, only the purchaser can answer that. Again, all tools are not created equal; warranty and support shouldn't be dismissed as trivial, because the costs associated with world class product support is tangible. Personally, a Case Trapper would be more pocket knife than I would ever need. However, I appreciate the craftsmanship and build philosophies of many Makers and therefore I purchase some of their products too, even though they exceed my EDC needs.

Years ago my Brother gave me all of his Craftsman hand tools; he advised that there was nothing wrong with them and they perform as designed. But, since he's an Independent Pro Auto Mechanic, he needed a more precision tool with better support. Now, when it's late in the day and a tool fails, he makes a phone call, and within the hour, the Snap-On truck delivers a replacement. If he had to wait until the following morning to take the tool back to Sears, then he would have lost several hours of wage earnings.

A tool that performs as designed and is reliable, is indeed in my mind a great tool, regardless of price. Folks may not always understand why some pay high dollars, especially for a product that appears no different than a much lesser priced product; fact is, it's justifiable in their mind, often for good reason too.
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  #17  
Old 11-02-2012, 10:36 AM
1911inMaine 1911inMaine is offline
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I guess what I keep reading is permanence. A good knife will be good longer than a bad knife will be good. Sadly I have to admit that I don't really have that permanent mindset, for me life changes and I find no need to be tied to anything permanently. I guess I'm just one of "those guys". It's cool to see such knowledgeable and passionate folks discussing something they so obviously enjoy.
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Just a guy wanting to learn some stuff about a gun I'm planning on buying.

Sardius Industries 9mm
12 gauge single shot
Soda straw with chewed up paper (my first projectile weapon)
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  #18  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:02 PM
GKC GKC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by US1911 View Post
Years ago my Brother gave me all of his Craftsman hand tools; he advised that there was nothing wrong with them and they perform as designed. But, since he's an Independent Pro Auto Mechanic, he needed a more precision tool with better support. Now, when it's late in the day and a tool fails, he makes a phone call, and within the hour, the Snap-On truck delivers a replacement. If he had to wait until the following morning to take the tool back to Sears, then he would have lost several hours of wage earnings.
That's a very good point...and the difference between someone who uses the tool in question to make a living or for survival, etc, and someone who just uses a tool on occasion, for light duty, etc.

Of course, there are those who collect fine knives for their own personal pleasure...and to each his own.
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  #19  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:52 PM
cwo4uscgret cwo4uscgret is offline
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This is two reasons:



The Bears. The dagger's blade is 9-1/2" the long clip point, close to 12". Both knives were made by my friend, Fred Rowe; handles scimshawed by my ex-wifw, sheaths by another friend, Sandy Morrissey, and the phot by Terrill Hoffman, one of the most outstanding knife photographers around.

There are knife collectors out there who rival gun collectors for the size and breadth of their collections.
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  #20  
Old 11-02-2012, 01:37 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Originally Posted by 1911inMaine View Post
I guess what I keep reading is permanence. A good knife will be good longer than a bad knife will be good. Sadly I have to admit that I don't really have that permanent mindset, for me life changes and I find no need to be tied to anything permanently. I guess I'm just one of "those guys". It's cool to see such knowledgeable and passionate folks discussing something they so obviously enjoy.
Sounds like you ought to be able to retire when you're 50. Unlike the rest of us, you won't have wasted your money on fancy knives and custom 1911's.
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  #21  
Old 11-02-2012, 11:36 PM
Kodadek Kodadek is offline
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Sounds like you ought to be able to retire when you're 50. Unlike the rest of us, you won't have wasted your money on fancy knives and custom 1911's.
Whoa, whoa, wasted? Wasted? I NEED my Emersons and Benchmades! Those low dollar kershaws will break in a zombies skull! No, I have from time to time had them all laid out or I've been showing them to someone and I realize what I've spent and it's a harrowing moment or two but I quash down all my doubts and drive on.
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  #22  
Old 11-03-2012, 12:25 AM
dakotaTex dakotaTex is offline
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Originally Posted by Kodadek View Post
....I have from time to time had them all laid out or I've been showing them to someone and I realize what I've spent and it's a harrowing moment or two but I quash down all my doubts and drive on.
Don't even go there! No point in adding up money already spent.

At least on eBay the top brands generally bring a pretty good percentage of their original price, especially with the box and whatnot. So you could recoup some of your expense.

And at some point I'll give my son at least a one of my better knives, like my Sebenza. He's an Eagle Scout and can appreciate a good knife. Giving him an inexpensive Walmart knife might have the same sentimentality, but it won't have the same practicality. The Sebenza should last long enough for him to give to his kid if he wants.

But knives are like anything else. If you want to spend money, someone is willing to take it, no matter how much you've got.


dakotaTex
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  #23  
Old 11-03-2012, 12:24 PM
vjb.knife vjb.knife is offline
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Don't get it

If you don't get it then don't worry about it. Sometimes I wish I had not gotten it but I do. Maybe it's because I have been an engineer for a long time with a lot of work in machining operations and metal processing businesses but I think it has more to do with just liking knives my whole life and being a diver who has broken and mistreated knives to the point of failure so I have always wanted something better. Unfortunately for my bank account I discovered the desirability of custom knives and the collectibility of certain factory knives like old Gerber Mark II's.

Sometimes I wish that I would be satisfied with a $40 Gerber gator or SOG Flash.
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  #24  
Old 11-03-2012, 12:26 PM
Kodadek Kodadek is offline
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Pretty much Tex. I have a nephew who's getting one my Emerson Sevens as a gift when he turns fourteen next month. He's a mature and responsible kid and I've seen folks give him a slew of cheap knives. Figured someone should step up and make him an addict (we hate to be alone). I figure I'll give him the first one I bought. First time I ever dropped that sort of coin on a knife so it has a fair bit of sentiment attached.
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  #25  
Old 11-03-2012, 02:29 PM
1911inMaine 1911inMaine is offline
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Originally Posted by TRSOtto View Post
Sounds like you ought to be able to retire when you're 50. Unlike the rest of us, you won't have wasted your money on fancy knives and custom 1911's.
That literally made me laugh out loud! My socioeconomic class is on the cusp of white trash and working poor. I know that the $18,000 I'll make this year isn't even a quarter of the price of some of the collections I've seen on this forum but how many of you rich folks only work 12 hours a day 3 days a week and get to spend 4 days a week with your kids making sure they get raised right? Yeah I'm a lil jealous of the things money can buy but if I have to choose between money and memories the memories I make with my wife and kids win each and every time. I figure another 18 years or so from now my youngest will leave home and I'll get back to doing things I really enjoy, until then an inexpensive knife and an economy handgun will just have to do. I'm never gonna have the money to retire, I plan on dieing at work and making workers comp pay to bbq my a$$. (Cremation)
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Just a guy wanting to learn some stuff about a gun I'm planning on buying.

Sardius Industries 9mm
12 gauge single shot
Soda straw with chewed up paper (my first projectile weapon)
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