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  #1  
Old 12-12-2019, 08:46 AM
euwe2 euwe2 is offline
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Compensated 1911 ammo

Recently i bought and shot some alumium cased 230 gr. FMJ ammo for my compensated 1911. i noticed on the box after i was picking up, it said on the box, not to shoot through a compensated pistol? why? and i heard not to shoot hollow points through a compensated pistol too. is this true? thanks in advance Reno J.
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  #2  
Old 12-12-2019, 08:21 PM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is offline
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It's fine, plated bullets if shot through a PORTED gun can have molten bits fly everywhere and possibly damage stuff. A comped gun doesn't have this issue really and will just kinda create black snow to a small degree if the rounds are really poorly plated.
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  #3  
Old 12-12-2019, 08:35 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is offline
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A guess--

Aluminum has a much lower melting point than brass. Compensator-equipped guns are often used for rapid fire purposes, which, in turn, could result in (build up of) very high temperatures in the firing chamber. Some compensator designs might also serve to "pick-up" additional heat via the compensator, which (heat) might in turn, transfer over the short barrel length to the firing chamber. Even if the heat doesn't reach melting point levels, I could imagine it causing significant weaking of a thin aluminum case.

Aluminum also doesn't absorb heat as well as brass. Whereas some firing chamber heat is removed via the ejection of hot brass, less heat would likely be removed via the ejection of aluminum cases. Again, potentially leading to higher accumulation of undissipated heat. (The same of course would occur in a non-compensated gun).

Again, I'm just guessing that the concerns might center around heat. If someone knows otherwise, please don't "flame" me too much.

I'd be curious to know if any other reasons.

(In any event, I don't use aluminum cased ammo at all).

I'm skeptical about the "no hollow points" advice. Not all advice is sound, and this might (?) be just one example; but I'd be curious if anyone else has heard similar advice with a sound explanation to go along with it.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 12-12-2019 at 09:21 PM.
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  #4  
Old 12-12-2019, 09:25 PM
euwe2 euwe2 is offline
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compensated ammo

Your reasoning does make a very good possible point.
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  #5  
Old 12-13-2019, 08:09 AM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is offline
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I have about 4000 JHPs through my carry gun and 5000 through my other comped guns, never an issue and they prefer the hotter loads.
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  #6  
Old 12-13-2019, 08:54 AM
drail drail is offline
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The "firing chamber"?
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:01 AM
yeti yeti is offline
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Aside from the heat sink reason, which is valid.
Aluminum cases do not seal in the chamber as well as brass and I believe the PSI of nearly all AL cased factory loads is lower (by comparison to brass). You want/need plenty of gas to run a comp.

Really should not run plated in ported barrels. I know there are some high quality plated bullets available (Gold Dot) but generally, cost effective plated bullets are a bad idea in a ported barrel for the reasons previously posted. Running plated with a comp can be a mess. Not a good idea.

JHP work fine.
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  #8  
Old 12-16-2019, 08:50 AM
euwe2 euwe2 is offline
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compensated ammo

when you say plated, does that the same as like a JHP?
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  #9  
Old 12-16-2019, 09:12 AM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by euwe2 View Post
when you say plated, does that the same as like a JHP?
Not the same. Following website describes things better than I can.

https://ammoguru.com/what-are-plated-bullets/

(FWIW, I use only Barnes solid copper bullets in my compensator-design 1911s. They are not used as range guns, so the ammo cost is of no concern.)
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  #10  
Old 12-16-2019, 09:22 AM
Striker2237 Striker2237 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeti View Post
Aside from the heat sink reason, which is valid.
Aluminum cases do not seal in the chamber as well as brass and I believe the PSI of nearly all AL cased factory loads is lower (by comparison to brass). You want/need plenty of gas to run a comp.

Really should not run plated in ported barrels. I know there are some high quality plated bullets available (Gold Dot) but generally, cost effective plated bullets are a bad idea in a ported barrel for the reasons previously posted. Running plated with a comp can be a mess. Not a good idea.

JHP work fine.
Back when freedom munitions was still a thing their plating was so light that my Czechmate would start a crazy spark show in the comp baffles and send bits upward like crazy every shot. Made for some great fun since it was like firing a BP cannon every shot!

I'll post a video showing what plated stuff looks like coming out of a comp, blazer and S&B are both really good and near identical to fmj
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  #11  
Old 12-16-2019, 11:50 AM
GBertolet GBertolet is offline
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If the ammo in question is Blazer, it does say on the box, not to use in compensated guns. I was told that the bullets have an additional plating, even though they are jacketed. The intent is to fully encapsulate them, especially the lead exposed base, for lead abatement in indoor ranges. The outside plating on the sides of the bullet, does frequently flake off, and the concern is that it could hit people alongside the shooter by the redirected gasses. At least that was what I was told.

Last edited by GBertolet; 12-16-2019 at 11:57 AM.
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  #12  
Old 12-16-2019, 12:03 PM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
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Back in the day when plated bullets first came out, the plating would spit out the barrel-cylinder gap in my revolver. It was bad enough to cause a little injury to bystanders.
Jus' sayin"

I don't know if that has ANYTHING to do with the box warning.
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  #13  
Old 12-16-2019, 02:10 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfut808 View Post
Back in the day when plated bullets first came out, the plating would spit out the barrel-cylinder gap in my revolver. It was bad enough to cause a little injury to bystanders.
Jus' sayin"

I don't know if that has ANYTHING to do with the box warning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBertolet View Post
If the ammo in question is Blazer, it does say on the box, not to use in compensated guns. I was told that the bullets have an additional plating, even though they are jacketed. The intent is to fully encapsulate them, especially the lead exposed base, for lead abatement in indoor ranges. The outside plating on the sides of the bullet, does frequently flake off, and the concern is that it could hit people alongside the shooter by the redirected gasses. At least that was what I was told.
Both of you might likely have pointed out reason #1, which would apply to typical indoor range conditions...or anyplace where bystanders were present. +1911 for sharing.

I hadn't thought of this one, but yes, that could really sting a bystander. Especially with one of those x-large S&W revolvers or similar.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 12-16-2019 at 02:15 PM.
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  #14  
Old 12-29-2019, 02:42 PM
drail drail is offline
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If your revolver is spitting lead or copper out the side of the b/c gap then you have a gun problem - not a bullet problem. Also NO ONE should EVER stand to the side of a revolver while it's being fired. Stand somewhere else.
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