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  #1  
Old 04-11-2017, 11:20 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Hornady bullet feeding die

Does anyone use this die on their progressive press? I've been using it on my Lee Loadmaster for a little while now and every 20 rounds or so I'll have feeding issues. I'm using it with 9mm 115gr, 124gr and 125gr bullets, when it works, its great, but when it doesn't drop a bullet it slows the operation down a lot almost not worth having it by the time I have to take the die apart to remove a stuck bullet. Just wondering if anyone else is having the same issues and has a fix?
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  #2  
Old 04-11-2017, 02:23 PM
tractor tractor is offline
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I've just brought three of them ( in .355, .400 and .450) for my RCBS Pro 2K. I replaced the RCBS bullet feeding die because I was having problems with it not feeding and/or abruptly dropping a tube full of bullets on to my bench and shop floor. So far I've used the Hornady die for well over 1500 rounds reloaded with no issue at all. It works for me quite well, even for 357SIG. I know you probably read the instructions but my technique is to tighten the adjusting screw down so that there is no collet movement (thier shake test) , then I loosen the adjusting screw about half a turn. Should get a little "rattle" inside the die. I then run a couple of bullets thru it and adjust from there- if it needs it. The other thing is case expansion. You need enough to to pick up the dropped bullet and it should be uniform from case to case. The thing I liked about the Hornady die is that I didn't need as much case expansion as on the RCBS die, but you still need some. Hope this helps some. Good and safe loading.
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  #3  
Old 04-11-2017, 06:07 PM
RealGun RealGun is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat C View Post
Does anyone use this die on their progressive press? I've been using it on my Lee Loadmaster for a little while now and every 20 rounds or so I'll have feeding issues. I'm using it with 9mm 115gr, 124gr and 125gr bullets, when it works, its great, but when it doesn't drop a bullet it slows the operation down a lot almost not worth having it by the time I have to take the die apart to remove a stuck bullet. Just wondering if anyone else is having the same issues and has a fix?
Are you using mixed head stamps? How many bullets are in the stack?
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  #4  
Old 04-11-2017, 10:34 PM
diadem diadem is online now
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I have used one for over 15K bullets now of about 5 different shapes and sizes. Like everything else it is not plug and play. You need to “tune” it. You need to take it apart and learn how it works. Once you do you can learn to diagnose issues quickly. There are 6 main variables you have to adjust and test.

1. Flare on case
2. Height the case rises into the die (or the dies height relative to the press)
3. Collette A diameter and tension
4. Collette B diameter and tension
5. Collette stack movement/tension (adjusted by the head or top ring)
6. Weight of the bullet stack

There are several youtube videos showing how to adjust them. Here is just one example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWG_8u-1Gfk

Another thing that will drive you crazy is inconsistent bullets. If you have bullets that vary in size for whatever reason, or have burrs or coating anomalies they will cause problems. Measure ones that get stuck.
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  #5  
Old 04-11-2017, 10:57 PM
1911_user 1911_user is online now
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I have two Hornady bullet feeding dies. I also had trouble with them working until I scrapped them for Mr. Bulletfeeder feeding dies. They (Mr. Bulletfeeder) dies work on a totally different escapement principle and they.... well, they work. I spoke with the owner and designer, Rick Koskela, and he graciously made me a couple of adapters that fit his dies and Hornady drop tubes. I have been using them together with great success. Not as fast or slick as a Mr. Bulletfeeder bullet collater but also not $400+ dollars; the die is $50, and I think the drop tubes are something like $30. A perfect compromise that works well for me.

The Hornady dies are a well made product but using the two split, tapered collets just calls for too much precision and consistency in the bullets IMO.

Brian

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat C View Post
Does anyone use this die on their progressive press? I've been using it on my Lee Loadmaster for a little while now and every 20 rounds or so I'll have feeding issues. I'm using it with 9mm 115gr, 124gr and 125gr bullets, when it works, its great, but when it doesn't drop a bullet it slows the operation down a lot almost not worth having it by the time I have to take the die apart to remove a stuck bullet. Just wondering if anyone else is having the same issues and has a fix?
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  #6  
Old 04-11-2017, 11:57 PM
DRAINSMITH DRAINSMITH is offline
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What kind of bullets are you using? They are not designed for lead. But with a small modification they will work.
I have 4 Ammo Plants and run 380, "Not recommended by Hornady" 9mm, .40, and .45. My left hand is for holding a cup of coffee. Not to place bullets.
Like everyone I place the collets in to the die but then I hold the die upside down and screw the adjustment in until I see the collet bottom out then back it off 1/2 turn and tighten it down.That part is now done.
I then place a properly expanded piece of brass in and raise the press up. I then load the bullet feeder die with bullets until the last one can be seen. I then screw the die down on top of the brass, as soon as I see the bullet fall I drop the ram down and turn the die in an other 1/4 turn. I then secure the lock ring and test. I haven't had one fail yet.
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  #7  
Old 04-12-2017, 05:47 AM
RealGun RealGun is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911_user View Post
I have two Hornady bullet feeding dies. I also had trouble with them working until I scrapped them for Mr. Bulletfeeder feeding dies. They (Mr. Bulletfeeder) dies work on a totally different escapement principle and they.... well, they work. I spoke with the owner and designer, Rick Koskela, and he graciously made me a couple of adapters that fit his dies and Hornady drop tubes. I have been using them together with great success. Not as fast or slick as a Mr. Bulletfeeder bullet collater but also not $400+ dollars; the die is $50, and I think the drop tubes are something like $30. A perfect compromise that works well for me.

The Hornady dies are a well made product but using the two split, tapered collets just calls for too much precision and consistency in the bullets IMO.

Brian
A version of the Bully Adapter is available to fit the MBF die. Need to note on your order.
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  #8  
Old 04-12-2017, 08:44 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRAINSMITH View Post
What kind of bullets are you using? They are not designed for lead. But with a small modification they will work.
I have 4 Ammo Plants and run 380, "Not recommended by Hornady" 9mm, .40, and .45. My left hand is for holding a cup of coffee. Not to place bullets.
Like everyone I place the collets in to the die but then I hold the die upside down and screw the adjustment in until I see the collet bottom out then back it off 1/2 turn and tighten it down.That part is now done.
I then place a properly expanded piece of brass in and raise the press up. I then load the bullet feeder die with bullets until the last one can be seen. I then screw the die down on top of the brass, as soon as I see the bullet fall I drop the ram down and turn the die in an other 1/4 turn. I then secure the lock ring and test. I haven't had one fail yet.
I'm using extreme's 124gr rn and everglades 125 jhp 9mm bullets and had issues with each. I'm not sure if I'm getting enough flare, I'm using Lee's powder drop die with the powder through expander, can't seem to get a real good flare and using mixed brass. The issue is the bullet will not drop no matter how I adjust the die just some times so I'm not sure whats causing it.
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  #9  
Old 04-12-2017, 09:19 AM
tractor tractor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat C View Post
I'm using extreme's 124gr rn and everglades 125 jhp 9mm bullets and had issues with each. I'm not sure if I'm getting enough flare, I'm using Lee's powder drop die with the powder through expander, can't seem to get a real good flare and using mixed brass. The issue is the bullet will not drop no matter how I adjust the die just some times so I'm not sure whats causing it.
Make sure you have the two collets installed in the proper orientation. Collet A goes in first with the slots pointed down. Collet B goes in next with its slots also pointed down.
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  #10  
Old 04-12-2017, 11:15 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealGun View Post
Are you using mixed head stamps? How many bullets are in the stack?
Yes, anywhere from 6 on up
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  #11  
Old 04-12-2017, 03:14 PM
DRAINSMITH DRAINSMITH is offline
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I am going to have to play ignorant on the Lee case expander. I don't know if it bells the case (bad) or flares the case (good). If you notice your bullet feeder die came with a PTX insert for the power drop. This will flare the case, the cone shaped expander will bell the case. Now on the collets the easy way to know witch one to insert first is the longer one is the A collet this is the first one that goes into the die.
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  #12  
Old 04-12-2017, 08:17 PM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRAINSMITH View Post
I am going to have to play ignorant on the Lee case expander. I don't know if it bells the case (bad) or flares the case (good). If you notice your bullet feeder die came with a PTX insert for the power drop. This will flare the case, the cone shaped expander will bell the case. Now on the collets the easy way to know witch one to insert first is the longer one is the A collet this is the first one that goes into the die.
I'm pretty sure I have die setup properly as far as the collets go. Yes the PTX insert came with the die won't work with the Lee die.
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  #13  
Old 04-12-2017, 10:56 PM
DRAINSMITH DRAINSMITH is offline
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O.K. I called the Chief "one of the fellow old geezers that I shoot with" He has 9 Lee Loadmasters, and only loads for 8 different rounds. He said to bell the case just enough to let the bullet to drop in. He also said do not turn the die down the extra 1/4 turn, because you are not going to be able to set the bullet deeper than the bell.
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2017, 11:35 PM
ubet ubet is online now
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Never mind

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk

Last edited by ubet; 04-12-2017 at 11:41 PM.
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  #15  
Old 04-13-2017, 06:58 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRAINSMITH View Post
O.K. I called the Chief "one of the fellow old geezers that I shoot with" He has 9 Lee Loadmasters, and only loads for 8 different rounds. He said to bell the case just enough to let the bullet to drop in. He also said do not turn the die down the extra 1/4 turn, because you are not going to be able to set the bullet deeper than the bell.
Thanks for your info but I'm not sure what you mean by the extra 1/4 turn?
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  #16  
Old 04-13-2017, 07:01 AM
Joe O Joe O is online now
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After reading this thread and watching the video, I ordered the LnL Hornady 45acp die, and a package of 3 tubes for my older LnL press, from Midway. About $60 shipped.Should be here tomorrow.
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  #17  
Old 04-13-2017, 08:12 AM
tractor tractor is offline
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Pat - I experimented with my Hornady bullet feeder die (.355/9mm) to try and duplicate your problem. Using an non flared 9mm case, I was able to drop a 115 FMJ bullet onto the case, repeatedly. The bullet just balanced on the case mouth and fell off but the die did drop it. I then reversed the orientation of the B collet (slots pointing up) and no bullets dropped. Same for the A collet. In these experiments, the die either repeatedly dropped a bullet or it didn't; there was no intermediate position.

Now I polished all my collets, inside and out, to remove any burrs. Those collet slots are EDM'ed and that can leave burrs. The other thing I did was to set up the die body in the press using the shortest case of that caliber that I could find. This way the die sits low in the press and will work for long and short cases.

If you're still having problems after all this, it's time to call Hornady, if you haven't already. - Tractor
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Old 04-13-2017, 09:33 AM
DRAINSMITH DRAINSMITH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat C View Post
Thanks for your info but I'm not sure what you mean by the extra 1/4 turn?
see post #6
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  #19  
Old 04-13-2017, 10:18 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tractor View Post
Pat - I experimented with my Hornady bullet feeder die (.355/9mm) to try and duplicate your problem. Using an non flared 9mm case, I was able to drop a 115 FMJ bullet onto the case, repeatedly. The bullet just balanced on the case mouth and fell off but the die did drop it. I then reversed the orientation of the B collet (slots pointing up) and no bullets dropped. Same for the A collet. In these experiments, the die either repeatedly dropped a bullet or it didn't; there was no intermediate position.

Now I polished all my collets, inside and out, to remove any burrs. Those collet slots are EDM'ed and that can leave burrs. The other thing I did was to set up the die body in the press using the shortest case of that caliber that I could find. This way the die sits low in the press and will work for long and short cases.

If you're still having problems after all this, it's time to call Hornady, if you haven't already. - Tractor
Interesting, I will take the die apart a recheck the orientation of the collects and check for burrs. What kind of bullets are you using?
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Old 04-13-2017, 05:45 PM
tractor tractor is offline
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Interesting, I will take the die apart a recheck the orientation of the collects and check for burrs. What kind of bullets are you using?
115 grain FMJ, pulled seconds, mixed brands. These are cheap range bullets, probably irregular
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Old 04-14-2017, 09:16 AM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Originally Posted by tractor View Post
115 grain FMJ, pulled seconds, mixed brands. These are cheap range bullets, probably irregular
I did some experiments last night I took the die apart cleaned it with Hornady's cleaner and lube reassembled it making sure the collects weir in the proper position and inserted die and adjusted it according to instructions. I loaded it with 5 125 gr bullets and they would not drop I turn the die down gradually a 1/16 a turn according to instructions, I got to drop and it dropped all five. The funny thing is when I reloaded with another 5 they would not drop. I think its time to call Hornady may be something wrong with the collects. BTW what did you use to deburr the inside of the collects, was it a dremel?
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Old 04-14-2017, 12:08 PM
techiede44 techiede44 is offline
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They can be fussy to set-up but once you have everything dialed in they do make volume production much easier/faster.

I use them for 9 & 45 with powder coated lead (the blue bullets). I did have to buff out the drop spots in the collets as well as spread the fingers. If you do spread the fingers do so carefully as they can easily break (been there, done that).

At your own risk to the dies: What works for me is that with the collets out of the die that the top one will allow a bullet to pass through - just. The bottom one will catch and hold the bullet just above the fingers. If it's any higher than that it won't drop right. Much more and it will drop multiples each time.

Also, once in a while a bullet will not drop...what I found is that the coating might be slightly uneven causing it to not come down correctly. What I do is remove the die, turn it upside down and give it a shake. 99 times out of a hundred it will resume dropping. If it doesn't I end up having to disassemble the die to clear the jam. When I started using the dies I was using FMJ's and didn't have this problem.

Only other problems I have are with the collator - 1) noisy as heck even with a cover; 2) I end up using some tape to shim the flex tube into the die so it doesn't slip out of place during long reloading sessions.

Lastly - I would avoid the dremel as it can take off more material than you want - I use some 600 or 1000 grit sandpaper on a dowel.
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  #23  
Old 04-14-2017, 12:33 PM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Originally Posted by techiede44 View Post
They can be fussy to set-up but once you have everything dialed in they do make volume production much easier/faster.

I use them for 9 & 45 with powder coated lead (the blue bullets). I did have to buff out the drop spots in the collets as well as spread the fingers. If you do spread the fingers do so carefully as they can easily break (been there, done that).

At your own risk to the dies: What works for me is that with the collets out of the die that the top one will allow a bullet to pass through - just. The bottom one will catch and hold the bullet just above the fingers. If it's any higher than that it won't drop right. Much more and it will drop multiples each time.

Also, once in a while a bullet will not drop...what I found is that the coating might be slightly uneven causing it to not come down correctly. What I do is remove the die, turn it upside down and give it a shake. 99 times out of a hundred it will resume dropping. If it doesn't I end up having to disassemble the die to clear the jam. When I started using the dies I was using FMJ's and didn't have this problem.

Only other problems I have are with the collator - 1) noisy as heck even with a cover; 2) I end up using some tape to shim the flex tube into the die so it doesn't slip out of place during long reloading sessions.

Lastly - I would avoid the dremel as it can take off more material than you want - I use some 600 or 1000 grit sandpaper on a dowel.
Ok thanks, maybe I just don't have it adjusted properly.
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Old 04-14-2017, 12:45 PM
diadem diadem is online now
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Originally Posted by Pat C View Post
I did some experiments last night I took the die apart cleaned it with Hornady's cleaner and lube reassembled it making sure the collects weir in the proper position and inserted die and adjusted it according to instructions. I loaded it with 5 125 gr bullets and they would not drop I turn the die down gradually a 1/16 a turn according to instructions, I got to drop and it dropped all five. The funny thing is when I reloaded with another 5 they would not drop. I think its time to call Hornady may be something wrong with the collects. BTW what did you use to deburr the inside of the collects, was it a dremel?
If you have ever turned the top in too tight it can bend the collet fingers in (too much tension) If there is too much inward tension on the top collet fingers, bullets will not drop properly. What you can do is find yourself a cone shaped object (or carve one from wood, aluminum, or a brass dowel) Small enough on one end to slip in the middle, and wider as it goes deeper into the collet. Go easy, a little goes a long ways. We are talking a quarter of a thousandths of an inch at a time.You use it to evenly spread the fingers on the collet outward slightly. Go Too far and all the bullets will drop at once. Every bullet seems to have a sweet spot, I adjust and test every time I change bullet style or size.

You can de-burr with 1000 grit sandpaper. I wouldn’t use anything coarser than that.
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  #25  
Old 04-14-2017, 01:06 PM
Pat C Pat C is offline
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Originally Posted by diadem View Post
If you have ever turned the top in too tight it can bend the collet fingers in (too much tension) If there is too much inward tension on the top collet fingers, bullets will not drop properly. What you can do is find yourself a cone shaped object (or carve one from wood, aluminum, or a brass dowel) Small enough on one end to slip in the middle, and wider as it goes deeper into the collet. Go easy, a little goes a long ways. We are talking a quarter of a thousandths of an inch at a time.You use it to evenly spread the fingers on the collet outward slightly. Go Too far and all the bullets will drop at once. Every bullet seems to have a sweet spot, I adjust and test every time I change bullet style or size.

You can de-burr with 1000 grit sandpaper. I wouldn’t use anything coarser than that.
Thats a great tip thank you I will try it. I was playing with last night and the bullets are dropping freely from collet B and in collet A they were about near the top where the holes are on the collet.
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