40 Caliber Question - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-16-2017, 09:01 PM
KnotRight KnotRight is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Coastal GA
Posts: 1,169
40 Caliber Question

I know why I stopped shooting 40 caliber. *It is a PIA to run the brass through the resizing die. *

These rounds were shot in a 3rd Gen 23. *All my 40s have been run through the Lee resizing die before reloading them. *

The question that I have is, after shooting a 3rd generation Glock 23, would you run the brass through the Lee die. *I use a set of RCBS dies to reload them.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-17-2017, 02:13 AM
BruceM BruceM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,750
Is the brass "Glocked".

Bruce
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-17-2017, 02:15 AM
69Chevelle 69Chevelle is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Louisville, ky
Posts: 100
Lee dies are all I use. I've ran a boat load of 40's through my Lee pro 1000 3 st press with no issues. 40's and 45acp are the easiest brass to resize in my press. 9mm has way more resistance to resizing then my 40's.
I've never used the RCBS dies so I can't say much on that, but ,myself and a good friend of mine use only Lee dies. Some of our brass has been through the reloaders now 7-8 times. Give em a try, might be what your looking for.
We both shoot Gen3 models 22 and 35's for reference.
Reply With Quote
 
  #4  
Old 02-17-2017, 05:21 AM
rdinak rdinak is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: America
Posts: 2,257
I find the old "glocked" brass term refers to early Gen 2 guns which indeed had a more generous chamber. If your .40 is Gen or newer no worries. While you can use the excellent REdding push through sizing die to insure no bad piece of brass gets mixed with you brass, i dont find it a required step.

Started off loading for a new RTF Glock with about few thousand carefully obtained once fired pieces of brass. Now I am loading for a 4 different Glocks and use mixed brass on my 550. Using an RCBS carbide sizing die, Redding competition seating die and crimp die. I use Hornady one shot lube to keep everything running along smooth and for more consistent COAL
Never have problems of rounds that fail to feed.


Bulk once fired brass purchased from the indoor range floor is a pretty safe bet.

These days the real risk in no longer bulk police brass fired in older Gen 2 Glocks, its the stuff that some hot rodded try to make .40 major for the local uspsa match. Range brass picked up after a match will definitely show some swolen brass near the base. And this type of brass abuse is not going to be saved running it through a push through sizer, Lee crimp die, etc. The brass is already weakened. While it can straightened into spec, the weak spot is still there.

YMMV
__________________
My Jack Russell helps me reload

Last edited by rdinak; 02-17-2017 at 05:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-17-2017, 08:09 AM
yeti yeti is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Illinois
Posts: 1,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnotRight View Post
The question that I have is, after shooting a 3rd generation Glock 23, would you run the brass through the Lee die. *I use a set of RCBS dies to reload them.
Not typically an issue for G23 3rd gen barrels. As Rdinak already mentioned, Glock had corrected the unsupported issue prior to that.
Yes, run all your brass through your resizing dies, but a GRX Push Thru die is not necessarily warranted.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rdinak View Post
I use Hornady one shot lube to keep everything running along smooth and for more consistent COAL...
Yup, try some One Shot...even (gasp) with carbide dies.
__________________

NRA Life Member
RSO
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-17-2017, 08:39 AM
69Chevelle 69Chevelle is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Louisville, ky
Posts: 100
1

Last edited by 69Chevelle; 02-17-2017 at 08:53 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-17-2017, 11:35 AM
rg1 rg1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 157
My Glock 23 3rd Gen. and Beretta Storm carbine do not swell 40 S&W brass and it sizes perfectly with my RCBS dies. However, once fired brass I buy that has been fired in who knows how many different 40 guns does need sizing with my Redding carbide GR-X push thru die. So many cases are swelled, not guppy belly from an unsupported chamber, but just swelled from generous sized chambers. If I don't use the GR-X die my RCBS sizing die leaves a radius where the sizing die carbide ring stops. On a few cases it will even wipe or displace brass material. Using the GR-X die makes all the cases perfect. Still you have to be careful and inspect all once fired brass because you will find one with a guppy belly that would require scrapping that case. Carefully inspect all around the base of the case for bad unsupported chamber marks. Those can be dangerous to reload. I usually find 1-5 cases in a 500 round bag that need scrapped. Buying once fired brass, use a push thru sizer for perfect cases or if you're just loading your own fired brass from your pistol then you may not need this step.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-17-2017, 12:11 PM
roaniecowpony roaniecowpony is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Socal
Age: 61
Posts: 1,649
I like that One Shot lube. It seems to be a lot less messy than the old RCBS sticky lube.
__________________
Life's too short to shoot an ugly gun.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-17-2017, 12:42 PM
BillD BillD is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Age: 62
Posts: 27,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdinak View Post
I find the old "glocked" brass term refers to early Gen 2 guns which indeed had a more generous chamber. If your .40 is Gen or newer no worries. While you can use the excellent REdding push through sizing die to insure no bad piece of brass gets mixed with you brass, i dont find it a required step.

Started off loading for a new RTF Glock with about few thousand carefully obtained once fired pieces of brass. Now I am loading for a 4 different Glocks and use mixed brass on my 550. Using an RCBS carbide sizing die, Redding competition seating die and crimp die. I use Hornady one shot lube to keep everything running along smooth and for more consistent COAL
Never have problems of rounds that fail to feed.


Bulk once fired brass purchased from the indoor range floor is a pretty safe bet.

These days the real risk in no longer bulk police brass fired in older Gen 2 Glocks, its the stuff that some hot rodded try to make .40 major for the local uspsa match.[B][/B] Range brass picked up after a match will definitely show some swolen brass near the base. And this type of brass abuse is not going to be saved running it through a push through sizer, Lee crimp die, etc. The brass is already weakened. While it can straightened into spec, the weak spot is still there.

YMMV
Are you thinking of 9mm major? Because .40 can be downloaded from factory specs and still make major.

As to the OP:
I've loaded tens of thousands of .40. Dillon 650 with a LFCD on the back and a full length sizer on the front.
No issues, though I always lube any pistol cases before reloading. It makes everything easier.
__________________
You can make excuses or you can make ready.
USPSA TY41889
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-17-2017, 03:27 PM
69Chevelle 69Chevelle is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Louisville, ky
Posts: 100
Bill I was thinking the same thing. He must of met 9mm major which I think is crazy. I've been downloading 40's for a few yrs now to make M PF. Too bad I don't get the time to shoot in these matches any more. Sure do miss it.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-17-2017, 05:09 PM
Snapdragon Snapdragon is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Brunswick County, NC
Posts: 2,781
I run all my 40 through a Redding push through before I size it but discard any cases that are visibly bulged. I don't know if the Redding die is necessary but do it anyway. Most of my 40 brass is range pickup.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-17-2017, 07:45 PM
Andyk Andyk is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 199
I have a old police trade in G22 gen2 and the brass is completely supported. Reloaded probably 10,000 rounds for it on a lee with lee dies. Never an issue. 9mm is much harder to size.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-17-2017, 10:06 PM
BruceM BruceM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,750
Quote:
While you can use the excellent REdding push through sizing die to insure no bad piece of brass gets mixed with you brass,
Using the so called "push thru" sizing dies on .40 S&W and 10mm brass which is bulged at the base will allow the bad cases to be chambered after reloading but does not repair the weak spot in the case. There have been numerous threads in this and other reloading forums covering this. I guess that IMO any case which has not sustained appreciable damage does not need to be run thru a "push thru" die and those which do require this are not safe for reloading. Yes-I know but it only takes one for a serious accident.

Bruce

Last edited by BruceM; 02-18-2017 at 01:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-20-2017, 06:14 PM
MSgt Dotson MSgt Dotson is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 8,253
Even with brass properly resized, a friend of mine suffered some case head separations after using the same mixed .40 brass for perhaps 10-15 reloadings at Major with Unique powder (we were well under max, at 6.7 gr of Unique with 155 gr moly RNFP bullets; 3 case head seps in 2 pistols over the course of two months)

.40 brass does not last forever, unlike .45 ACP
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-20-2017, 09:45 PM
BruceM BruceM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,750
The only pistol case head separations I've ever seen or heard of which were not attributable to a manufacturer's defect were in bulged 10mm and .40 S&W cases which were resized and reloaded. It does not take a maximum load to cause a failure in a damaged case which has been "salvaged".

Bruce
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-21-2017, 05:30 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,458
Reloading .40 ammo

If I have "bulged brass" near the back of the case, it has already created a weak spot, even if it is resized back to normal. I would throw the brass in a box and eventually sell it as scrap....which is what I do with all split cases and fired primers.

I have never needed to full length resize any case after it was properly made to reduce a bulge..... Some bullets that are wider in diameter may make a slight bulge or "Coke bottle effect," however, if they fit my case gauge or barrel chamber properly, I don't worry about it.

I have found 5.6 grains of WST powder with a 180 gr. JHP shoots very well in my Bar Sto barrel STI 2011 Limited gun. I have fired sub one inch 5 shot groups from a rest at 25 yds. and the round makes Major power factor.....
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-21-2017, 08:34 AM
KnotRight KnotRight is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Coastal GA
Posts: 1,169
Rwehavinfunyet, I feel the same way but just eyeballing the brass can you see the budge all the time? That is why I was running all 40 cal through the push through die.

If you can see the budge there is not question about the future of the brass.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-21-2017, 12:05 PM
BillD BillD is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Age: 62
Posts: 27,219
I've reloaded and shot over 70k .40. I've gone to USPSA matches 3-5 times month for many years.
Never seen a .40 case head separation.
__________________
You can make excuses or you can make ready.
USPSA TY41889
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-21-2017, 05:41 PM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,458
Bulged brass.....

If the bulge of the brass case is close to the lower portion of the case and near the head stamp, this may cause the case to weaken near the inside web of the case. If a bulge is caused by a wider diameter bullet, you may clearly see the bulge when the bullet is seated, but as long as the loaded round will fit a case gauge or easily fit the chamber of your gun barrel, this should not be a problem even with the visual appearance of a bulge.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-21-2017, 07:28 PM
KnotRight KnotRight is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Coastal GA
Posts: 1,169
The reason I am so interested in this subject is because of this 9 MM that was not any fun to shoot. Lucky I only got a bunch of burnt powder in my face.

Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-23-2017, 10:16 AM
WalterGC WalterGC is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 13,781
.40 Sheitz und Weazel is the only caliber that I'd never reload.
__________________
Shoot to kill! They'll stop when they're dead!

Not a Glock armorer!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-23-2017, 11:52 AM
BillD BillD is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Age: 62
Posts: 27,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalterGC View Post
.40 Sheitz und Weazel is the only caliber that I'd never reload.
Well, that's good to know.
__________________
You can make excuses or you can make ready.
USPSA TY41889
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-23-2017, 12:46 PM
69Chevelle 69Chevelle is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Louisville, ky
Posts: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillD View Post
Well, that's good to know.
I agree Biil D. More for us to go around.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-23-2017, 02:55 PM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,458
9mm case rupture....

Quote:
The reason I am so interested in this subject is because of this 9 MM that was not any fun to shoot.
I only use ramped barrels for high pressure rounds, since they often have better case support. The barrel chamber completely encircles the case up to the extractor groove. I use W/N ramped barrels for 9mm, .38 super, and .40S&W guns I have built......and have never had a case blow out. I have loaded rounds quite hot, and slightly over SAMMI specs, and have not had any issues using fully supported ramped barrels.

Many standard 9mm barrels may not offer the best case support, and it depends on the gun maker.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:52 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved