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  #1  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:00 AM
leadhead2 leadhead2 is offline
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Buffers???

Any of you guys use buffers in your .45 ACP,s?
I've heard good things and bad things about
them.... Wouldn't be used in any CC gun.
Your thoughts.
Denny
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  #2  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:06 AM
Guyfromohio Guyfromohio is offline
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They came in my Wilsons. I don’t really have any opinion. I don’t dislike them enough to remove them and I don’t like them enough to put in other 1911s.
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  #3  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:10 AM
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Snake oil
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  #4  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:10 AM
ndnchf ndnchf is offline
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Upon recommendation here on the forum, I put a shock buff and new recoil spring in my 1917 vintage WWI 1911. I don't shoot it much in respect for its age. But I put the buffer in to save wear and tear on the old soldier. I took it to the range last week and put 50 rounds through it. It ran flawlessly.
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  #5  
Old 02-14-2020, 09:44 AM
robertrwalsh robertrwalsh is offline
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I have them in my Government Model and Commander. As long as you inspect them when you clean and change them as needed they don't cause problems and maybe-probably (IMHO) help longevity.
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  #6  
Old 02-14-2020, 10:23 AM
GBertolet GBertolet is offline
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I use them in all of my 45's. Some makes hold up better than others. I like Buffer Technologies, and CP's. The buffers should be checked and replaced, if necessiary, every time you clean your gun. Your load, and strength of your recoil spring, will determine the frequency of replacement.
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  #7  
Old 02-14-2020, 11:45 AM
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One of my guns showed almost no buffer wear after 500 rounds, so that gun doesn't need a buffer.
Another gun was cutting into the buffer after 100 rounds, and I didn't want to make buffer-changing a part of every range trip, so I don't put them in that gun, either!
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  #8  
Old 02-14-2020, 11:49 AM
leadhead2 leadhead2 is offline
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OK, Thanks guys..... I don't shoot them that much and don't use
balls to the wall loads, so I might pick up a few. I guess they won't
anything. Thanks for the info.
Denny
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  #9  
Old 02-14-2020, 12:56 PM
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Kevin Rohrer Kevin Rohrer is offline
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I have thought about using them in practice, and might if I can find a source for good ones that don’t cost a lot. There is no way I will pay Wilson $100 for twenty of them.
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  #10  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:34 PM
Alland Alland is online now
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A great solution to a non existent problem.
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  #11  
Old 02-14-2020, 05:00 PM
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apipeguy apipeguy is online now
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Only keep one in three of my guns. A 5” Les Baer PII that I use for bullseye and most likely don’t need it with my light loads but it functions 100% and so I leave one in. I also have one in a 5” Wilson CQB and that also runs 100% with it in. The other gun that I keep one in is a Wilson EDC X9 that was designed to run with a shock buff. I carry my CQB and my EDC X9 at times and having a shock buff on them gives me no pause at all. The shock buffs are checked after I shoot them and I have never found any real issues (shock buff failing). If I find any abnormal wear then they are swapped out.

I tried one in a couple of different guns and had some issues with the guns running 100%. So those don’t have them.

If the guns run 100% with them, why not.
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Last edited by apipeguy; 02-14-2020 at 05:03 PM.
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  #12  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:25 PM
Geologist Geologist is offline
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I've been using them for thousands of rounds in my SA loaded. Change as needed. No failures, gun runs perfectly. Does it help? No idea, but I know it does not hurt. Plus I had 2 or 3 of the more respected members here tell me they run them, even if they don't advertise the fact openly.
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  #13  
Old 02-14-2020, 10:40 PM
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I usually only use them in older 1911s that I shoot to reduce the possibility of peening or cracking the frame or slide. On new 1911s with modern heat treating and metallurgy they're not needed as long as you replace the recoil spring when you're supposed to.

Definitely do not use them in any sub-5" 1911 as the slide travels a shorter distance than in full-length guns, and adding a buffer shortens the travel even more.
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  #14  
Old 02-14-2020, 11:11 PM
mark2734 mark2734 is offline
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I only use them on my lightweight alloy guns to reduce the possibility of peening
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  #15  
Old 02-16-2020, 11:14 AM
drail drail is offline
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Buffs are more useful to modify the recoil impulse and to gauge the recoil spring's condition than to prevent frame damage. I like the way the gun recoils with a buff. But over the years I have never seen a buff "save" a frame. If the mainspring under the hammer is strong enough it will prevent the slide from beating the frame to death. My oldest SA 1911 went for 40K rounds with a buff always in it. The frame still cracked on both sides of the dust cover due to insufficient clearance between the dust cover and slide.

Last edited by drail; 02-16-2020 at 06:10 PM.
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  #16  
Old 02-16-2020, 04:21 PM
log man log man is offline
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I only use them on ALL of my 1911's!

LOG
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  #17  
Old 02-16-2020, 04:23 PM
mkk41 mkk41 is online now
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Keep a fresh proper weight recoil spring in the pistol and it's probably not needed.

However , in older pre-war slides , it is cheap insurance against this.
Attached Thumbnails
cracked slide.jpg   cracked slide-2.jpg   cracked slide-3.jpg  
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  #18  
Old 02-16-2020, 04:52 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is offline
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I do not use them.
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  #19  
Old 02-16-2020, 05:03 PM
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Hey mkk41, is it okay if I save those pictures and use them for reference the next time somebody claims that it's okay to shoot the snot out of old collectible 1911s?
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #20  
Old 02-16-2020, 05:08 PM
mkk41 mkk41 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Hey mkk41, is it okay if I save those pictures and use them for reference the next time somebody claims that it's okay to shoot the snot out of old collectible 1911s?
They're not my pics. I got them off a BING web-search. ''1911 cracked slide'' , ya find stuff like this.
Attached Thumbnails
Cracked slide 4.jpg  
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Last edited by mkk41; 02-16-2020 at 05:13 PM.
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  #21  
Old 02-16-2020, 05:23 PM
mkk41 mkk41 is online now
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Apparently , older 1911s are the only ones susceptible to this.
Attached Thumbnails
cracked slide 5.jpg   cracked slide 6.jpg   cracked slide 7.jpg  
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  #22  
Old 02-16-2020, 05:58 PM
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Unfortunately it can happen to any pistol regardless of model or vintage if it has a similar slide profile, with a sharp stress riser right at the recoil spring tunnel junction. Proper heat treating and metallurgy will make a slide last a long time, but if you run a gun hard enough and don't replace the recoil springs frequently it can happen to you. At least with a modern 1911 it's not a huge deal to replace the slide. But on a vintage collectible it completely kills off the value.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #23  
Old 02-16-2020, 06:27 PM
jc2721 jc2721 is online now
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Wow, never saw pics like those. I have a couple of vintage guns, now I'm glad I never fired many rounds through them.
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  #24  
Old 02-16-2020, 06:56 PM
mkk41 mkk41 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Proper heat treating and metallurgy will make a slide last a long time, but if you run a gun hard enough and don't replace the recoil springs frequently it can happen to you.
Well , in 40yrs as a Tool & Die maker , I'm very aware that sharp corners are where cracks start , especially in hardened steel objects subjected to any shock or stress.
Whenever possible , a small radius should be left in corners to minimize this.
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  #25  
Old 03-17-2020, 08:14 PM
glazer1972 glazer1972 is offline
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I do not.
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