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  #1  
Old 01-14-2020, 12:58 PM
markmontana markmontana is offline
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Inland M1 Carbine

I'm looking for some information on an M1 Carbine manufactured by Inland that I saw in LGS today. They took it in as part of a trade. I've always liked the M1 platform but I have hesitated to pull the trigger because I just don't know much about them. This particular model seems to be in good shape, everything seems to work as it should, but I did not shoot it. The asking price is $900. I have two questions: (1) is this a reasonable price; and, (2) are the Inland versions generally regarded as good and reliable?
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  #2  
Old 01-14-2020, 02:04 PM
sevenL4 sevenL4 is offline
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Is it an original (1944) rifle or recently manufactured? If it's recent, I think it's overpriced. If it is a 1944 year of manufacture you need to examine it to see if it has been sent to the arsenal for re-hab. My 1944 YOM carbine has all the correct pieces and never even had a bayonet lug installed as many did during and post WWII. I figure it's desirable to collectors but can only guess its value at around $2000.00. The CMP site has a Carbine forum that's full of info.
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  #3  
Old 01-14-2020, 02:11 PM
havanajim havanajim is offline
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Assuming all is as it should be, then I'd say 'YES' and 'YES'. The price is not a steal, but if in good (read: perfect) shape, it's certainly fair. Otherwise, you may wish to try and knock it down a bit. The M1 Carbine is a very robust little rifle, and Inland certainly knew how to manufacture them.

The CMP M1 Carbine forum is a great place for quality info:

https://forums.thecmp.org/forumdispl...er=desc&page=2
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  #4  
Old 01-14-2020, 02:21 PM
hub1home hub1home is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markmontana View Post
I'm looking for some information on an M1 Carbine manufactured by Inland that I saw in LGS today. They took it in as part of a trade. I've always liked the M1 platform but I have hesitated to pull the trigger because I just don't know much about them. This particular model seems to be in good shape, everything seems to work as it should, but I did not shoot it. The asking price is $900. I have two questions: (1) is this a reasonable price; and, (2) are the Inland versions generally regarded as good and reliable?

Go to this link and check them out:

https://www.gunbroker.com/All/search...20M1%20Carbine

You should be able to make up your own mind by comparing with these 5 pages of Inland guns, etc. for sale.
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  #5  
Old 01-14-2020, 03:26 PM
DarkLord DarkLord is offline
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There are no "bad" USGI M1 carbines, and that's a good price. Inland made more Carbines than anyone else, and they're excellent.
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  #6  
Old 01-14-2020, 04:57 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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The price is a little steep for an all-USGI M1 Carbine, and a rip-off if it's a modern commercial Inland (which I wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole). M1 Carbines are very fun guns to shoot, but they are also a dime a dozen so don't let anyone tell you theirs is anything special unless it's a rare one that's all matching and correct (95% of them aren't).
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  #7  
Old 01-15-2020, 09:55 AM
Don Flynn Don Flynn is offline
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My 2 bits. If it is a USGI Inland offer them $750-800 bucks and see what happens. USGI Inlands were considered the most reliable of the WWII Carbines. Prices on USGI Carbines have gone up so be prepared to pay what the shop asks.

If it's a "new" production Inland offer them $400-500 bucks tops and be prepared for problems. The new ones have had major QC issued with bolts.

The easiest way to tell is a WWII production Inland will be marked "Inland Div" on the receiver and if it has the post war adjustable rear sight installed be hard to read.

A new production one will be marked "Inland Manufacturing" and be easy to read, it'll be either on the side or well behind the rear sight IIRR
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  #8  
Old 01-16-2020, 09:10 AM
Uncle Mike Uncle Mike is offline
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Hi, here's another link . This one is to the Carbine Club, http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/forum/forums.html

Click on the picture of the Carbine at the top ( http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/ ) and you will get all types of information; years, mfg.'s and all types of important stuff, Mike
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  #9  
Old 01-16-2020, 12:55 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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Get the serial number and take some pictures. Most likely the Inland, if an original, is a rebuild or at least has the later features. It also is probably 'imported' and has an import mark which is the name and location of the importer, usually found on the barrel behind the front sight, on side or bottom - also found on receivers below the wood line. A good Inland with matching barrel and decent stock and no import mark could go $1K. An actual original as-manufactured in WWII might be twice that. With import mark, maybe $850. With 'BLUE SKY' import mark and crummy Parkerizing job, maybe less.
So you can see how there is no way to judge value without a lot more info.

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  #10  
Old 01-16-2020, 09:07 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Be especially careful with the Blue Sky-marked imports. Some of them were stamped so hard on the barrel that it affected the bore.
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  #11  
Old 02-02-2020, 06:23 AM
mkk41 mkk41 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Be especially careful with the Blue Sky-marked imports. Some of them were stamped so hard on the barrel that it affected the bore.

I can testify to that!
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  #12  
Old 02-05-2020, 08:52 PM
RazorBurn RazorBurn is offline
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A legit non imported USGI M1 Carbine below a grand now is a good deal. If import marked I'd want to be well below 700 bucks myself especially if it's Blue Sky marked as dsk and mkk41 stated.

Sure you may get lucky and stumble across a sub 700 buck legit USGI carbine but that has become as much of a unicorn as sub 700 buck legit USGI 1911.

I put 800 bucks real money in this Winchester M1 Carbine with DCM paperwork back in 2012. It was a good deal then and a great deal now.



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  #13  
Old 02-05-2020, 09:05 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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You would not get my Inland off of me.

Not for nine hundred bucks anyway.
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  #14  
Old 02-05-2020, 10:06 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
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I esteem the M1 Carbine and would rather use it than any AR 15 derivative made. If the M1 Carbine won't accomplish the task at hand then bigger rifles than the AR 15 are available here to call on.

There's no such thing as a bad Carbine manufacturer. As has been said, if it isn't an import or a flagrant Bubba's garage put-together then anything under a $1000 is a "deal."

An acquaintance did pick up a Blue Sky import Inland at the Dallas Market Hall Show back in the early 1990s. Was not attractive, but all there complete with the excruciatingly prominent import marking. It was the most accurate Carbine I ever shot off the bench rest at 100 yards.

Top Carbine is an all-original Quality Hardware & Machine Company. Bottom Carbine is my knock around and home defense rifle with second rear sight revision, otherwise pretty much a World War II Underwood.

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  #15  
Old 02-05-2020, 11:08 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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My 43 Inland and my 44 IBM are both very clean.

And neither has the bayonet lug which I do not care for. I saw a clean postal meter at the Roanoke gun show last weekend. I was tempted, they were pretty proud of it though.
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  #16  
Old 02-06-2020, 02:25 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
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I'm an eccentric. I realize that.

But, I also don't care for the added bayonet lug. When I was a teen, I got it in my head that I would add a bayonet lug to my dad's Carbine. I thought it'd be neato to fix bayonets and march about the countryside with the Carbine so outfitted. Even went to the trouble to obtain a bayonet lug assembly, but never got around to installing it on the rifle. Sure am glad now that I didn't. I'd have probably marred original surfaces and his rifle wouldn't be original.

There are several other popular accessories that outfit Carbines that I don't personally care for.

Don't want to use 30-round magazines. I have some on hand, but they ruin the balance of the Carbine and are ungainly. I ain't afraid of a reload and a person can "cause things to happen" with 15 rounds.

Don't care for the flip type safety. I know why this revision was adopted. But, the Carbines I was familiar with always had the earlier push button safety. Never had any trouble differentiating between safety and magazine release on the early ones.

While we're at it, save us from the twin 30-round magazines tapped together in an opposing attitude. If one 30-round magazine is ungainly and heavy then two only compound the misery and all that weight probably wears the magazine catch.

The twin magazine pouches on the stock don't do anything for me. Oh, I tried it when a teenager because I thought it looked so tough, but it didn't take too many hikes afield to learn that twin 15-round magazines in a pouch on the stock turn a svelte, balanced, rifle that shoots like "pointing a finger" into a awkward and clumsy club. I took the magazine pouch back off and it's never returned. Magazine pouches belong on belts. They were originally intended for the M1936 pistol belt. Accessible on belts is a great place for a few extra magazines in pouches.

Now it is entirely true that pouches may be found fitted to Carbine stocks of our fighting men in original World War II, Korea, and Vietnam photographs. On the front lines too. Still, a whole lot more Carbines may be seen original wartime photographs to be without this clever addition than the few photographs seen with it.
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  #17  
Old 02-06-2020, 09:36 PM
DarkLord DarkLord is offline
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The flip safety was designed because people were reaching for the safety and dropping their magazines. Flip safety cured this problem. It makes sense on a military arm.

I'm not a big fan of 30 round magazines. I guess if it was my only SHTF rifle, I'd give them another look. The reliability issues traced to 30 rounders (assuming military magazines) were traced to M2's, and they really weren't any trouble in an M1. The straight then curved shape caused some binding, and the high cyclic rate (775rpm) coupled with the very short bolt travel past the magazine, means at times the 30 rounder just can't advance the next round fast enough. Typically not a problem with the M1 though.

Still, I just love the look and balance of the M1 Carbine with a 15 round magazine.
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  #18  
Old 02-11-2020, 09:57 AM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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And for most any non-military purpose imaginable, 15 rounds of .30 Carbine should be adequate in a semi-auto. Like all other M1 carbine owners, I accumulated many magazines including some 30-rounders, but in those days the carbine had a role in my home-defense strategy that it no longer has. I sold a lot of parts and spare parts and the 30-round mag catch was in that lot. I still have a few of the 30s and I guess I should think about letting them go. I have definitely gotten to the age where I'm looking at this kind of stuff with a more critical eye, meaning what to sell, what to bequeath and what to keep.
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Old 02-18-2020, 10:05 AM
army_eod army_eod is offline
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We acquired a Nam bring-back NPM carbine. I broke it down and examined it, cleaned it and we shot it. It is a great carbine. I love those carbines. I am pretty sure it was an arsenal refurb, but it was a Nam bring back.

Put into context that if I were to want a really excellent carbine, I would buy it from Fulton Armory. You won't touch one for under $1500. But they are the BEST.
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