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  #1  
Old 01-12-2020, 06:11 AM
Totally Tactical Totally Tactical is offline
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Old Timer view of 1911 brands

Sold my Ruger CMD commander to a friend yesterday.
Nothing wrong with it, but I came to the conclusion that brands like Ruger, Sig, Smith and Wesson and the 1911 just don't go together.
Yes they make good guns.
But when I think of Ruger, I think Strong single action guns.
When I think of Sig, I think of The West German P series guns.
Smith and Wesson, I think of those great "N" frame revolvers.

I also don't like the 9mm in the 1911.

A cartridge that was used by the Germans in WW2 in a American gun, just isn't right.
But that's a rant for another day.
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:49 AM
dmthomp32 dmthomp32 is offline
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I'm not saying I disagree but will say that these manufacturers have proven capable of putting out quality 1911's. However I have never owned one from any of the brands you mentioned! I have only owned Colts and a Dan Wesson. That being said when you think of a 1911, what brand sticks out in your mind? Is it Colt? Other war-time manufacturers, Ithaca, Singer, Union, Remington? Or what about the high end market, like Wilson? Someone who built their company from the ground up in the 1911 market? Not arguing, just curious to see what sticks out to you.

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  #3  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:53 AM
FNHipowerluv FNHipowerluv is offline
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9mm was around long before WW2, and is actually older than the 45 auto. Everyone has nostalgia for the 1911, and everyone and their brother builds a clone, because of it. Colt was the only game in town for a long time. Companies cloning literally everything they make (except for the double action revolvers) for cheaper, and sometimes better helped fuel years of financial crisis for the company. Colts still have the best resell value, IMO.
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  #4  
Old 01-12-2020, 08:20 AM
BGDNTX BGDNTX is offline
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I always start with the basics: Colt 1911 Govt with 230g Ball Ammo, no rail or frills
From there, Colt Commander, Officers Model, 38 Super Govt or Cmdr
From there, DW, LB, WC, and others that are in the 1911 business.
No other caliber but 45 or 38 Super.
I've been looking for a carry 1911 at low price so if I have to give it up, it won't be a super big loss. To that end, looked at Kimber, Ruger, Springfield, Remington, and a couple of Para.
I always come back to a Basic blue Govt Colt as my bottom line acceptable. And for an inexpensive, under $1000 carry, will take the $800 Colt over most everything else.
Yes, the other brands like SA Rugers, Semi Sigs, Glocks for sure, S&W snub-nose, are all great. But I agree with you Totally Tactical - a 1911 has to be from a 1911 shop, and be a real 1911.
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  #5  
Old 01-12-2020, 08:24 AM
BGDNTX BGDNTX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FNHipowerluv View Post
9mm was around long before WW2, and is actually older than the 45 auto. Everyone has nostalgia for the 1911, and everyone and their brother builds a clone, because of it. Colt was the only game in town for a long time. Companies cloning literally everything they make (except for the double action revolvers) for cheaper, and sometimes better helped fuel years of financial crisis for the company. Colts still have the best resell value, IMO.
I agree completely. Guns like the Colt 1911 and others pass the test of time. and the FN HiPower 9mm is in that category for sure. Interesting that both are John Browning related.
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  #6  
Old 01-12-2020, 08:44 AM
fnfalman fnfalman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Totally Tactical View Post
Sold my Ruger CMD commander to a friend yesterday.
Nothing wrong with it, but I came to the conclusion that brands like Ruger, Sig, Smith and Wesson and the 1911 just don't go together.
Yes they make good guns.
But when I think of Ruger, I think Strong single action guns.
When I think of Sig, I think of The West German P series guns.
Smith and Wesson, I think of those great "N" frame revolvers.

I also don't like the 9mm in the 1911.

A cartridge that was used by the Germans in WW2 in a American gun, just isn't right.
But that's a rant for another day.
I feel you.

The only 9mm that the 1911 should be chambered for is the 9x23SR (aka .38 Super).
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  #7  
Old 01-12-2020, 08:45 AM
fnfalman fnfalman is offline
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Of course since that the Commander was first made in 9mm Luger...
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  #8  
Old 01-12-2020, 09:10 AM
hardluk1 hardluk1 is offline
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totally tactical You should spend some time reading up on who made 1911's during WWI . Having another firearm company make them during ww2 also is not new . How about a type writer company that made more 1911's than colt ?? Or adding adding machine company , railroad or ithica that made as many as colt 1911 during WWII !! How about 1911 contracted to other countries to build ? Guess you hate commanders and lite weight models in general as it was designed to be a 9mm before being chambered in 45acp and 38 super !!
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  #9  
Old 01-12-2020, 09:11 AM
FNHipowerluv FNHipowerluv is offline
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Originally Posted by fnfalman View Post
Of course since that the Commander was first made in 9mm Luger...
And built built on an aluminum frame.....If the internet existed back then, I can only imagine trash talking that would surround that gun's release. We seem to treat everything as a gimmick, before giving it a chance.
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  #10  
Old 01-12-2020, 09:20 AM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Totally Tactical View Post
Sold my Ruger CMD commander to a friend yesterday.
Nothing wrong with it, but I came to the conclusion that brands like Ruger, Sig, Smith and Wesson and the 1911 just don't go together.
Yes they make good guns.
But when I think of Ruger, I think Strong single action guns.
When I think of Sig, I think of The West German P series guns.
Smith and Wesson, I think of those great "N" frame revolvers.

I also don't like the 9mm in the 1911.

A cartridge that was used by the Germans in WW2 in a American gun, just isn't right.
But that's a rant for another day.[IMG class=inlineimg]https://forums.1911forum.com/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG]
I feel the same way sometimes too. But then I look at other things?

For example, do you only own Fords? After all, it was the original car company. Maybe we should all still drive Model Ts 🙂

While the 1911 was issued to our troops in .45 ACP, anyone know the original caliber? Wasn’t it a 38? If I recall, Browning started with a .38 bit yes...the gun adopted by the Military was the .45 but .38 were issued to nurses and I also think to spies. The gun was also released in .22

9mm is a strange round from a 1911 to me....but boy, they sure do shoot well from them and a 2011 chambered in 9 is awesome.
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  #11  
Old 01-12-2020, 10:54 AM
passx passx is offline
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Didn’t Mr Browning originally design the 1911 in 9mm? Seems like I read that somewhere, and only “bumped” things up at the military’s request.

I have a number of 9mm 1911’s that I truly enjoy, easy to shoot, easy on me, cheap & very accurate in spite of all the criticism That accuracy was not a possibility with a 9mm round, my experience is that it’s just not true.

Now I’ll add that I also have several 1911’s in .45 that since I started reloading is now quite affordable to shoot and I do enjoy shooting them as well, as I also enjoy shooting my ruger 22/45 .22 as much as anything I have.......... guess I just enjoy shooting and enjoy the variety available. It is the spice of life.
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  #12  
Old 01-12-2020, 11:56 AM
FNHipowerluv FNHipowerluv is offline
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Originally Posted by passx View Post
Didnít Mr Browning originally design the 1911 in 9mm?
No, but Browning's earlier designs such as the Colt 1900 were chambered in the 38 ACP. The military grew a hatred for 38 cal handguns after disappointing performance during the Banana Wars. Browning went back to the drawing board and designed an entirely new handgun to fire a 45 caliber round in response. The DoD was so dead set on a 45 cal handgun, DWM made a 45 auto Luger just for them.
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  #13  
Old 01-12-2020, 12:11 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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I don't know about being an old-timer, but I have the same hangups as the OP. If I have a 1911 it's got to be a Colt (or Remington Rand) and in .45ACP. If I have a Glock, Hi-Power or Beretta 92 it's got to be a 9mm. No FEG or Taurus clones either. My only break from tradition for has been with a Winchester 1873 clone, which I bought in .357 Magnum as the original .44-40 is prohibitively expensive to shoot since I don't reload. But I were made of money I'd have an original Winchester in that caliber, not a clone.
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  #14  
Old 01-12-2020, 12:28 PM
simonp67 simonp67 is offline
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My only objections to Sig & Smith 1911ís is their use of an external extractor. They build excellent guns that work well with them but I prefer an internal extractor.

Apart from that I own Colts, Baer, Springfield, Kimber, Wilson, etc in 9mm, 38 super & .45 - the 1911 done right, regardless of who builds it it caliber, is the best gun out there - for me at least.


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  #15  
Old 01-12-2020, 12:54 PM
KAS300 KAS300 is offline
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If it's a well-made, reliable gun I don't care who made it. Whatever flats yer boat, I guess.
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  #16  
Old 01-12-2020, 01:39 PM
coyotebuster coyotebuster is offline
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When it comes to 1911's I also favor Colts, with a couple Wilsons on the side. I am nearing my 64th birthday and lived in the time that Colt was the single maker of the 1911 style pistol, and I never saw one chambered in anything but .45 ACP until I was nearly 40 years old. That's when I discovered the Colt Combat Commander, chambered in .38 Super, that's stashed in my safe. Well of course I had to have it.
While I grew up hunting upland birds and varmints, I honed my firearms skills as a youngster with a 20 Gauge shotgun, and later a Winchester Model 12 Skeet, a Marlin .22 RF, and later a .22-250 caliber bolt action rifle. When I entered the handgun world it was with a S&W model 19 revolver as a new hire Deputy Sheriff. To me, S&W made the premier revolvers, and I saw no need to waste my money on anything else. When I felt the need to experiment with a semi auto pistol there was nothing else to do but buy a Colt 1911 in .45 ACP. To me, Colt was the only maker of the 1911, so no need to look any further.
As I built my collection of 1911's, I continued to look to Colt for what I wanted. While my Department began to issue the 1911, and my first was a mil spec Springfield built at Gunsite, when they became available, I quickly got them to issue me a stainless Colt Gunsite Pistol. That pistol is the duty gun I was given seven years ago when I retired from the street. My Colt Gunsite Pistol came from Colt with two Wilson Combat magazines, and seeing the quality of them, as the commander of our Enforcement Division, and department armorer, I began buying Wilson Combat 47D magazines to issue to all of the officers on our department for use in their duty guns. I also began using Wilson's parts, where I could, for repairs and upgrades to our issued 1911's. Naturally then, when I decided to step up to a higher end 1911 than Colt, I chose to go with Wilson Combat. While my EDC 1911 on the job ( well they still needed an armorer ) remains a custom Colt Defender in .45 ACP, in my personal pistols, I have moved away from the .45 ACP to .38 Super. I hand load, so the added cost of .38 Super is not an issue with me. I can load .38 Super for about twelve cents per round, using plated or jacketed bullets. I found a deal on six hundred rounds of SD .38 Super ammo loaded by Georgia Arms, that gave me 124 gr Gold Dot HP's at 1325 FPS from my four and 4.25 inch barreled Wilson and Colt pistols. I've sped up my hand loads to where they hit near the same POA as the Gold Dots. At my age, I have no fear of shooting up all my factory loaded SD .38 Super ammunition, and can cheaply load all the quality practice ammo I need.
I am without doubt a traditionalist in every way. I love blued steel and nicely figured walnut. What I've learned over fifty years of shooting is that Colt makes a great semi auto pistol, and quality AR-15's, S&W makes revolvers, Winchester and Remington make good bolt rifles, and either .45 ACP, or .38 Super is the bomb from the 1911 pistol.

Last edited by coyotebuster; 01-12-2020 at 01:51 PM.
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  #17  
Old 01-12-2020, 03:38 PM
bmcgilvray bmcgilvray is offline
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I enjoy being loyal to Colt. All Colts live here except for a single Remington Rand.

When I was a kid it was Colt or military contract variants.
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  #18  
Old 01-12-2020, 08:18 PM
WaterDR WaterDR is offline
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I “get” nostalgia but I don’t live by it either.

Buying a new Colt .45 1911 doesn’t make it any better or even more original than any other 1911 because nothing today is made like it was in 1911 anyways. Fortunately even the worst made new 1911s are probably better made guns than the old rattle traps 🙂

But I get it!!!! I never....NEVER would own a V6 Mustang. Dumb to me anyway. But yet, I the new v8s have nothing in common with an old 351.
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  #19  
Old 01-13-2020, 10:17 PM
NonHyphenAmerican NonHyphenAmerican is offline
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Everyone is entitled to their own choices and preferences.

Personally, I favor Springfield .45acp 1911's, Garand Rifles, .30-06 in general ( I currently own over a dozen rifles in .30-06) Ford Vehicles, (currently own 4, have owned a total of 25 total, 17 vans, 2 pickups, a Maverick, a Bronco that I still have, 2 Sables, a Montego and a Milan) Single Malt Scotch and Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer.

There are tons of people who will disagree with my preferences, and tons of others who will agree.

Personally, I always find myself hoping that people are enjoying their choices and preferences.

If they don't, they need to change their choices and preferences.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:47 PM
Jason D Jason D is offline
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I get a feeling shooting a Colt that just doesn't come with other guns. I have many different brands of 1911, but none of them spark the feeling of shooting a Colt.

That said... I am open to them being chambered in whatever caliber floats my boat. The majority are .45, but there is are .38, 9mm, and 10mm guns in the mix. I really don't think JMB would mind his gun being chambered in 9mm, and would be proud his gun has lived on in many sizes and calibers.
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  #21  
Old 01-14-2020, 04:52 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is online now
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1911 Colt pistols....

I have no preference for Colt pistols.....I judge a gun more by what I intend to use it for..... I have had issues with Colt pistols, mainly when Colt went on strike in the 1980's and the company hired scab labor..... I have owned several Colt Gold Cup pistols in the past. I had a collet bushing crack that disabled the gun.....a tenon front sight flew off during a local action shooting match, and on one Colt Gold cup, used for NRA Outdoor Bullseye matches, the Eliason rear sight stripped and would no longer allow windage adjustments.....

I started building my own guns about 15 years ago, and am a DIY gunsmith.....I do not work on other folk's gun, and do not want to pay for a mfg. license..... I do not own a vertical mill or lathe, so my guns are built using some limited machine tools, and a MIG welder when I need to add metal to make a part fit better.....

I like the STI 2011 platform, and have built quite a few STI 2011 guns in 9mm, .40S&W, and .38 super......mostly 5" guns, but I have built Commanders, and one compact carry 9mm using a 3.5" slide and barrel. I enjoy being a DIY gunsmith, and save quite a bit of money when I don't pay full retail prices...! My concealed carry gun is usually an STI 2011 Commander .38 super.....with hot .38 super JHP handloads that perform like a low end .357 magnum round. I carry 16+1 rounds in the gun, and one spare 17 round mag on my opposite hip. This works for me....

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 01-14-2020 at 04:55 AM.
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  #22  
Old 01-14-2020, 07:33 AM
Dddrees Dddrees is offline
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Old school when it comes to quite a few things but when it comes to my own personal experience in the military I never thought favorably of the old rattle trap they assigned me way back when. This even before I had even heard the term. Thought more favorably of the brand new Berretta when the military decided to make that switch. I do remember asking someone why they were so loose and I was told because they had been in service so long and broken down and cleaned so often. I never realized that was the way they were designed to begin with.

Now I would rather have 1911 than a Berretta but give me one that is fit tighter and has some of those newer developments such as extended magazine wells that make it even easier to use. I'm just not emotionally tied to the original design and personally I would rather have a Semi Custom from Wilson Combat with all the options. Dehorning and such does make for an even nicer 1911.

Last edited by Dddrees; 01-14-2020 at 09:02 AM.
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  #23  
Old 01-14-2020, 11:32 AM
tipoc tipoc is offline
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Back in 1948-49 Colt released the Commander in 4 calibers. They were 45 acp, 38 Super, 9mm (9x19) and 9mm Glisenti for the Italian market. This was the first American made pistol chambered in 9mm.

The most popular versions of the Commander sold in the U.S. were the 45 and the 38 Super until maybe the last decade. It took a long while for American shooters and gun makers to accept the idea of a 1911 in 9mm. It was like eating a bowl of cereal with water, wearing a tuxedo while running a chainsaw, or drinking cherry flavored beer. But times change and there is alot of beer being drunk that is fruit flavored in bars these days and strawberry flavored whiskey.

With so many excellent guns made in 9mm over the decades I've never been tempted to get a 1911 in 9mm.

I do like 38 Super and Colts.

I'm not a fan of overbuilt 1911s. Guns should be simple.

tipoc
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  #24  
Old 01-14-2020, 01:30 PM
LocoGringo LocoGringo is offline
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I'm glad I don't live my life or buy my guns limited by all of these "rules" based on nostalgia. The most important factors to consider are 1) is it reliable 2) is it durable 3) is it accurate 4) does it fit me? The name on the slide means nothing if it doesn't fit these criteria.

Don't know how to change my "resume" at the bottom in my sig line, but I've since added a Springfield Armory TRP Operator half rail to the fold and am looking at adding a Dan Wesson Specialist Commander in 9mm. Like I said, I don't give a flip about the name on the side as long as it fits my 4 criteria. The only thing the name on the side means to me is quality and reputation (to be verified).

Good day gents...
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  #25  
Old 01-14-2020, 03:21 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tipoc View Post
Back in 1948-49 Colt released the Commander in 4 calibers. They were 45 acp, 38 Super, 9mm (9x19) and 9mm Glisenti for the Italian market. This was the first American made pistol chambered in 9mm.
I believe you were thinking of the 9x23mm Steyr, which I believe some export Commanders were chambered in. The Glisenti is the same dimensions as the 9x19 but reduced in power. The Steyr is similar to the .38 ACP and was popular in countries like Italy where the 9x19 was illegal for civilians.

As for buying based on nostalgia, or looks, or whatever... I buy whatever I like regardless of what practical use it may or may not have. I already have all the "cream of the crop" guns I need to fight World War Three with, so at this point I'm just filling my collection with stuff I always wanted to have "just because".
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