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  #1  
Old 12-03-2018, 04:44 PM
Bradd D Bradd D is offline
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Do any reputable 1911 smiths do this?

Highly polish all the internals, the frame rails, disconnector rail, and barrel hood?
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  #2  
Old 12-03-2018, 07:08 PM
Greg Derr Greg Derr is offline
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Hmm. Polish yes, highly is subjective .
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  #3  
Old 12-03-2018, 08:41 PM
Gary Wells Gary Wells is offline
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A good reputable smith will do what you want to your gun, within reason, as long as it is not detrimental to the build his name goes on.
Not everybody likes high polish SHINY. I don't.
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  #4  
Old 12-03-2018, 08:45 PM
Ytown1911 Ytown1911 is offline
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https://www.patriotgunpolishing.com/

Superb to work with and out-of-this-world results that I can personally speak to.
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  #5  
Old 12-04-2018, 07:22 AM
MDP MDP is offline
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When you start excessive polishing after the parts are fit you'll start increasing your tolerances.

MP
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  #6  
Old 12-04-2018, 08:18 AM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDP View Post
When you start excessive polishing after the parts are fit you'll start increasing your clearances.

MP
Fixed that for you.
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  #7  
Old 12-04-2018, 08:45 AM
perazzi perazzi is offline
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Wear blocks are polished to allow wringing together. I don't want my slide/frame surfaces doing that.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
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  #8  
Old 12-04-2018, 09:47 AM
kinnison kinnison is offline
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A smith will do anything you are willing to pay for remember time is money .
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  #9  
Old 12-04-2018, 01:30 PM
tray burge tray burge is offline
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Do it yourself, remember you're polishing, not removing any metal.
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  #10  
Old 12-04-2018, 02:52 PM
Jolly Rogers Jolly Rogers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tray burge View Post
Do it yourself, remember you're polishing, not removing any metal.
Disagree. ANY surface that is abraded will have that surface removed. Polishing is abrading with progressively finer grits to remove the surface down to the level of the scratches or surface roughness. The black smuts that is on the polishing cloth after you polish metal is.....metal.
Joe
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  #11  
Old 12-04-2018, 04:00 PM
NoExpert NoExpert is offline
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I do. Oh, wait - I'm not a 'smith
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  #12  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:53 PM
EvolutionArmory EvolutionArmory is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tray burge View Post
Do it yourself, remember you're polishing, not removing any metal.
Polishing is removing metal.
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  #13  
Old 12-04-2018, 06:43 PM
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pistolwrench pistolwrench is offline
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'Polished' means different things to different people.

If we are talking 'shiny, really really shiny', just a few areas on my builds:

Front and back of the disconnector paddle.
Middle sear leaf where it contacts the disconnector.
Rear surface of the trigger bow.
Hammer hook tips.
Primary angle on the sear.
Feed ramp.
Mouth of the barrel.
Barrel crown.
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Last edited by pistolwrench; 12-04-2018 at 06:46 PM.
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  #14  
Old 12-04-2018, 06:45 PM
Bradd D Bradd D is offline
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I should clarify. I'm not looking to do it. I bought a new Dan Wesson Valor online and the seller (dealer) had his gunsmith polish the items mentioned in my OP. I'm talking high gloss shiny polish. I was unaware of it until I got it home and detail stripped it.
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  #15  
Old 12-04-2018, 07:45 PM
*MAYHEM* *MAYHEM* is offline
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I'm not "reputable" but I polish anything and everything that moves against something else, including steel mag followers and feed lips. The smoother it is, the easier it will slide against the opposite surface. I have even used a buffing wheel in the trigger tracks.
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  #16  
Old 12-06-2018, 11:06 AM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Highly polished surfaces do not hold as much lubricant for as long as less polished surfaces.

A nice 'brushed' surface is very good at holding lubricant.
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  #17  
Old 12-06-2018, 02:45 PM
EvolutionArmory EvolutionArmory is offline
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More guns get ruined by people “slicking up” their 1911’s than I’d like to admit.
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2018, 03:02 PM
rrabullseye rrabullseye is offline
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If you want it shiny, get a shiny hard chrome finish
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  #19  
Old 12-06-2018, 03:39 PM
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pistolwrench pistolwrench is offline
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Mis-directed emphasis on getting a 1911 'as smooth as possible'.
With a 1911 some friction can be conducive to function.
A 'super smooth action' can increase the cyclic rate beyond the ability of the magazines.
Proper geometry of the feed way trumps mirror finish.
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  #20  
Old 12-06-2018, 06:29 PM
341 341 is offline
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I love this forum.
Troy341
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  #21  
Old 12-06-2018, 08:42 PM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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I lube each metal to metal contact moving part with a moly paste or anti seeze.
Moly
Eliminates all wear
Reduces friction
Prevents galling
Fights corrosion
Doesn’t attract dirt.

My guns never leave home without it.
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