basic beavertail fitting - Page 4 - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #76  
Old 05-26-2016, 09:14 PM
45 Shootist 45 Shootist is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 14
Great post and first rate job. You won't get a better job from most smiths.
The only thing I would add is to use quality files that are good and sharp. Putting some chalk in the teeth of the file helps keep it from loading up with metal. Keep your files clean. A flattened brass cartridge case mouth makes a great tool for cleaning out the file teeth.
Be sure to go to finer grit polishing when you are getting near to final fit. It makes polishing much easier. Get a firm grip on the Dremil when using grit wheels, they can scoot on you and be sure the frame is held tight.

Thanks for posting.

My Best, John
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 08-10-2016, 07:17 PM
ForesterPumice ForesterPumice is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 692
Thank you very much, I just got a Wilson combat bulletproof that needs fitting, and I wasn't sure how best to go about it. I'll try your way,and not skip steps.

I was wondering why the guy I bought it from included an extra old thumb safety, maybe exactly for this.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 08-18-2016, 10:26 AM
Wildbill608 Wildbill608 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 240
That beavertail fitting is all wrong. I know it will fit your web of your hand if your Tape or use Rubber Band DOWN and finish the Final Blending. Not PUT a WEDGE Behind the Beavertail and hold it out to the final blending
Reply With Quote
 
  #79  
Old 08-18-2016, 11:01 AM
BBBBill BBBBill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Alabama and Florida, US
Posts: 9,459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildbill608 View Post
That beavertail fitting is all wrong....
Really? Did you even read completely through his fitting process? Did you notice that at least one of the top tier smiths (Pistolwrench/Chuck Rogers) applauded his work and even said that it inspired him to do better on his builds? Many of us who have installed beavertails have used this method with great success whether found/developed on our own or seen/borrowed from here or some other smith's advice. This method, if followed, will yield a safety with a very close fit to the frame (tiny gap) and a blended transition both on the top of the tangs (appearance) when the safety is not depressed and the bottom of the tangs (comfort and appearance) when the safety is depressed. Can't ask for anything better than that. Another top tier smith (John Harrison) offers a tool to assist in fitting that does the same job as the OP's scrap aluminum wedge. If it were not the correct way to do it I'm pretty sure that his tool would have been a failure. Instead it sells pretty darned well.

Perhaps you need to reconsider your assessment. The wedge is for blending the upper surface of the tail in the out/disengaged position, not the depressed position.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 10-08-2016, 11:51 AM
Houlton Houlton is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Va Beach,Va
Posts: 103
When they came available I bought one in the early 80"s. Took me 5 hrs with a file and hacksaw( all the tools I had) but it came out well. Several years later I had the gun hard chromed and the smith had to do no more to that area than any other.
Reply With Quote
  #81  
Old 10-08-2016, 12:56 PM
EvolutionArmory EvolutionArmory is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Somersworth NH
Posts: 4,022
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildbill608 View Post
That beavertail fitting is all wrong. I know it will fit your web of your hand if your Tape or use Rubber Band DOWN and finish the Final Blending. Not PUT a WEDGE Behind the Beavertail and hold it out to the final blending
Dang, I guess I've been blending grip safeties wrong all these years. Thanks for straightening me out
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 11-07-2016, 08:45 PM
ForesterPumice ForesterPumice is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 692
Thank you , I did one before I read your tutorial and I'm not happy with that one.

I've done two more since using your tutorial, and they both came out how I wanted them, not as perfect as yours, but close.

An undersized pin, (I used a transfer punch) is great idea because you can see engaged & disengaged.

I don't use a jig, I use a socket to mark the circle, scribe, then sharpie, leaving about 1/16 " to file and craytex.

Alternatively one could use 2 sockets of the same size, and bolt them on to make a free jig. That's how I did my first one.

Last edited by ForesterPumice; 11-07-2016 at 08:48 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 12-05-2016, 03:38 PM
CAPistol CAPistol is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 11
wow...beautiful work. real art!
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 12-17-2016, 10:13 AM
roaniecowpony roaniecowpony is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Socal
Age: 61
Posts: 1,657
It's been 25 or more years since I fitted one of these. Nice recap. I'm blending in a factory OEM installed Springfield BTGS this morning, trying to put some nice on the Christmas gift gun for my wife. This helped. Thanks much to the OP.
__________________
Life's too short to shoot an ugly gun.
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 01-20-2017, 01:55 AM
ForesterPumice ForesterPumice is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 692
This is THE BEST tutorial on fitting a beavertail, I tried a couple times using this, but I skip a few steps. I'm going to try again and follow every step.

One thing, I don't understand what the purpose of using several different tapered thumb safties, here..

({
OK it has taken tons of tries but I finally have the scribe thought the frame and the GS. Next I use old Thumb safeties that I have sanded down so the shaft tapers. I have lots of these with varying degrees of taper. I use vise grips to hold on to the old thumb safeties and just keep marking the tangs and filing them, only on the high spots. Start to try your permanent TS to see if it will start though the hole.}}]

What does this do? I feel like im missing something that might be important. Also, what can be substituted for the tapered thumb safety's, possibly tapered nails ground to fit?

Excellent tutorial again, I wish the OP had done more like it, for fitting barrels, sear jig, etc.

I'll post my progress on my aluminum frame build, I found a grip safety in my "box of many oddball parts" that looks just like the one used here. I'm a fan of the mild beavertail with that chunky bit.

I just tried drop in colt beavertail and it was hideous compared to a fitted one.

I make glass paperweights and marbles, no one really cares if they are perfectly spherical except the maker, having a perfectly blended GS is similar imo.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 01-20-2017, 01:59 AM
ForesterPumice ForesterPumice is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 692
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45 Shootist View Post
Great post and first rate job. You won't get a better job from most smiths.
The only thing I would add is to use quality files that are good and sharp. Putting some chalk in the teeth of the file helps keep it from loading up with metal. Keep your files clean. A flattened brass cartridge case mouth makes a great tool for cleaning out the file teeth.
Be sure to go to finer grit polishing when you are getting near to final fit. It makes polishing much easier. Get a firm grip on the Dremil when using grit wheels, they can scoot on you and be sure the frame is held tight.

Thanks for posting.

My Best, John
Absolutely agree. Nice tip on the chalk.
Another good trick is to mount a brass brush to your bench to clean files quickly. I'm not positive, but I've always been suspicious that a steel wire brush might dull files...Probably not.
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 01-20-2017, 04:18 AM
Jolly Rogers Jolly Rogers is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 3,473
Tapered safety pins allow the excess metal to be indicated during test fitting. The further the pin is inserted the closer the grip safety is forced to the frame to initiate the contact showing where to sneak up on the fit at the spot contact. Then the final size pin should allow almost complete contact. The high spots being removed previously.
Joe
__________________
1911
The instant emergency response number.
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 04-24-2017, 08:55 PM
se3388 se3388 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southern Missouri
Posts: 122
About as close to perfect as you can get.


Steve........
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:20 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved