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  #26  
Old 10-10-2015, 02:28 PM
blueone2 blueone2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Berryhill View Post
Nice write up! Palmetto Enterprises is another popular parkerizing chemical.
http://www.palmettoenterprises.net/P...-Welcome-.html

Does anyone have experience with both the Shooters Solution and the Palmetto that can compare them?
I have used both on M1 Garands and prefer Palmetto. It seems to have a little darker color than Shooters Solutions.
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  #27  
Old 11-13-2015, 04:23 PM
kitchencounsel kitchencounsel is offline
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I've found that when undertaking something new, it's often best to just bite the bullet and get the starter kit. You might wind up with some stuff you don't need, but at the very least you will have a "known good" starting point to use as a benchmark.

Of course, that is predicated on buying a legitimately good starter kit. I got the one from Brownell's, and although it included some safety items I'll probably never use, I got the basic ingredients and a good set of instructions (which included a primer on the chemistry) to get me started.

I picked up a couple of hot plates and candy thermometers at weekend estate sales, and I was in business. Set everything up on a folding table in the back driveway and parked my first 1911 in one afternoon. I started out with some random AR-15 small parts to get the hang of it, then did the 1911 small parts and finally the slide and frame.

About the only thing I did learn in terms of mistakes is that you really do need to prime the parkerizing solution with some sacrificial steel in order to avoid the first pieces being a very light gray. The kit provides powder, but my first parts were a pretty light gray. The second batch was darker, and by the time I got to the 1911 everything was a very nice WW2 shade of medium gray. I think the powder is fine, but next batch of fluid I make new will get a nice chunk of tool steel bar stock or the like to work on before I run the actual parts.

So all in all, Parkerizing is not a big deal. It's a little messy and you have to watch the heat tolerances, but it's not hard to do.
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  #28  
Old 01-29-2016, 10:11 PM
Dr.Lou Dr.Lou is offline
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Here's my Norinco that was recently done by a close friend. He also performed some of his other magic, making it a favorite for carry and range.
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  #29  
Old 03-13-2016, 05:15 PM
SKINNYMIKE SKINNYMIKE is offline
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color

Do I assume correctly that the darkness can be adjusted by use (or not) of the (added) iron? I have a Caspian frame that is a very light grey, that looks like oxidation on stainless. The Piece is not blasted. Does park adhere to smooth surfaces? I really like the finish but, need to re-do because of scratches and don't want to spray. The finish is almost transparent, not heavy or thick and smooth like the gun is shipped in the white but it is a "finish". Huh!
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  #30  
Old 03-13-2016, 07:09 PM
John Q. Citizen John Q. Citizen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SKINNYMIKE View Post
Do I assume correctly that the darkness can be adjusted by use (or not) of the (added) iron? I have a Caspian frame that is a very light grey, that looks like oxidation on stainless. The Piece is not blasted. Does park adhere to smooth surfaces? I really like the finish but, need to re-do because of scratches and don't want to spray. The finish is almost transparent, not heavy or thick and smooth like the gun is shipped in the white but it is a "finish". Huh!
Two things:

1) The color will be lighter on areas that are harder. Old GI slides are a good example of this, where they only spot-hardened certain areas (around the slide stop notch, etc.). The old style Sig slides would show the weld lines around the muzzle when parked.

2) Yes, you need to media blast a part before parkerizing. Blasting increases the surface area of the metal. And the deeper or more aggressive the media blast, the darker the finished parked part will be.
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  #31  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:17 PM
chuck17 chuck17 is offline
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Zinc parkerizing creates a lighter gray surface with a finer crystalline structure, and the manganese parkerizing creates a darker gray to black finish and a thicker, coarser crystalline structure. It was recommended to me to use the zinc parkerizing as a pre-treatment on firearms that would get a spray-on finish like GunKote.
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  #32  
Old 04-12-2016, 03:55 PM
ACES_Tactical ACES_Tactical is offline
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Brownell's is the brand I use all of the time. It is consistent, and I can get Zinc or Manganese. I have done Black Oxide on SS guns in the past, since park will not work on SS. Guns all look great.
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  #33  
Old 04-13-2016, 09:27 AM
NoExpert NoExpert is offline
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Don't know if this will help answer DrDenby's question, but here it is with more detail:

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  #34  
Old 05-27-2016, 04:59 PM
45 Shootist 45 Shootist is offline
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When I first wanted to be a Gunsmith, I worked for an old smith who was getting ready to retire. Did a lot of Parkerizing for him. He already had the solution mixed and seasoned. Just a consistence sandblasting, brief boil in water and into the Park solution. When the parts stopped bubbling, out they came.
Then they were covered with "Rig" for a couple days, cleaned and re assembled. The Park jobs always looked great.
Never got into Parkerizing in my shop, but sure did my share of Bluing. As said in another post, bluing first then parking makes the finish darker.
I have seen, but I don't remember where, that a Parkerizing solution that produces more of a mil spec green finish is available, though mil spec guns didn't come out green originally. I believe it was from much oiling and time.

John
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  #35  
Old 06-19-2016, 12:26 PM
Flattops Flattops is offline
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Darker green finish parkerizing...

Yes, there are two types of parkerizing solution, the military generally used grey phosphate for guns, and the darker colored one for motorcycle and jeep parts. Either type of parkerizing can be made more attractive with a few extra steps.

After the media blasting, if you use any type of sand or crystaline powder, it helps to go over the parts with a bronze wire wheel to knock off any of the particles and dust that is embedded in the steel. As always, rubber nitrile gloves are important to keep any fingerprints off the parts.

Step two is the best part, I hope you have good neighbors. On a seperate BBQ , you want to heat up some old, dirty motor oil, the dirtier the better. I bring it to very hot, but not boiling. Be safe, no kids, no pets, no distractions. You do NOT want it to boil over onto the grill and catch fire. Wear long sleeves and gloves, do this in the driveway away from any outbuildings....

Transfer all your parkerized parts onto a towel, let them air dry for a minute, then put them directly into the heated motor oil. Any water still on the parts will spatter, so be careful. The thing here is that while the steel is hot from the parkerizing, the pores have opened up, and they will accept the oil into the parkerized surface, where it will remain trapped.. Let the parts remein in the oil for about 20 minutes, and remove from heat. Let the whole batch cool for a while, and then remove the parts and place on a towel and let the warm oil run off. when cool, wipe down with a rag.... no degreaser ! Parts done this way will remain perfect and rust free for years. I have a 46 Knucklehead that I have done and it has been ridden in the rain for 20 years and still looks like new. I did an old Blatz bottle opener and left it outside, winter and summer, for 10 years, and it never changed a bit.
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  #36  
Old 08-15-2016, 09:18 AM
sixshooter44 sixshooter44 is offline
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When you say the dirtier the better would used diesel oil be the best? That **** is black and dirty as hell. I have an old biker friend that uses grease instead of oil on his Harley parts, he swears by it
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  #37  
Old 09-07-2016, 01:02 AM
labuyo labuyo is offline
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I would like to try this out. I have a 1911 slide that has a parkerized finish but showing some fading (blotchy) in some areas. Do I need to sand blast the slide again prior to Parkerizing? Or do I just de-grease and dunk it in the Parkerizing solution?
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  #38  
Old 09-07-2016, 07:48 PM
John1125 John1125 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by labuyo View Post
I would like to try this out. I have a 1911 slide that has a parkerized finish but showing some fading (blotchy) in some areas. Do I need to sand blast the slide again prior to Parkerizing? Or do I just de-grease and dunk it in the Parkerizing solution?
The best would be to blast all of it then it would match .
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