Drying meat - Page 2 - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old 12-20-2016, 05:42 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,869
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyC View Post
I had to look it up - average 50F and between 40 and 90% humidity that week.

Heck, you reminded me I hadn't posted the recipe I used - I made a second batch last week which also turned out fine, so here it is:

2.5 lbs of 90/10 or 85/15 hamburger
1 TBsp roasted/crushed coriander
2.5 tsp salt
1.5 tsp crushed black pepper
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1 finely-crushed clove
2 TBsp vinegar
3 TBsp worcestershire sauce

Mix well with the meat and marinade covered overnight in the fridge before stuffing the casings (narrow ones). I usually make each sausage about 34" long or so - then bend each in half over the dowels.
Thanks
One more dumb question- I'm seeing 4 TBS of liquid in your recipe. Not enough for what I'd normal think of as a 'marinade'. Am I correct in assuming that you simply mix the ingredients ad let stand in the refrigerator overnight?
__________________
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. ~Samuel Adams~
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-21-2016, 11:42 PM
AndyC's Avatar
AndyC AndyC is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 6,078
Yes, just mix it in evenly throughout the meat and let it stand overnight.
__________________
My Iraq Pics

Preferred Travel Agent - 72 Virgins Dating Club
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-22-2016, 11:27 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,869
I gave this a try today, used a countertop dehydrator instead of time and airflow.

I cut 1x 2" slabs from a cheap roast. I had to use pre ground colliander as that's all that was available, and I used canning salt as I had it on hand.

The more finely ground salt was a mistake, even though I only left it on for 15 minutes and gave it a vinegar dip to rinse it before drying, it was much too salty for my taste. Proper rock salt won't absorb as much.

The coriander, something I haven't used in dried meats before, blends well with cracked pepper, and makes for a different, and good, product. Usually, when I do jerky, its thinner and more dried. This offers a great flavor combination, and a softer texture. Once I get a handle on the salt, a g9od product.
__________________
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. ~Samuel Adams~
Reply With Quote
 
  #29  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:01 AM
AndyC's Avatar
AndyC AndyC is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 6,078
Glad you enjoyed the flavors, other than the salt

I use rock salt because it's easier for me to get the right level of saltiness simply using timing - but good on you for being bold and giving regular salt a try.

Ground coriander is fine - you'll get a good idea of the flavor. I just like the traditional feeling of the coriander hulls under my teeth but I'd definitely use ground if I had to. A little goes a long way with that stuff, though, but I scatter it lightly and evenly over the meat along with the crushed pepper.

Some day I'll experiment with fine salt to determine how much would be appropriate to sprinkle on and leave on; it can get a bit wasteful using rock salt.
__________________
My Iraq Pics

Preferred Travel Agent - 72 Virgins Dating Club

Last edited by AndyC; 12-23-2016 at 08:03 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-25-2016, 08:48 AM
AndyC's Avatar
AndyC AndyC is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 6,078
Latest batch of biltong, made from a 3-1/2 lb chuck roast:





The fat is almost the best part - in a bush/survival situation, though, fat is like gold.
__________________
My Iraq Pics

Preferred Travel Agent - 72 Virgins Dating Club
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 12-25-2016, 11:56 AM
Nytcrawler93 Nytcrawler93 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 802
Thanks for posting. Now I have a project for when boredom sets in!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-26-2016, 07:02 AM
Bushwhacker Bushwhacker is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 25
Just sampled my cured deer.

From my first deer I salted and hung one of the muscles from the thigh (long thin one between some of the big cuts, no idea what the cuts are called in English)

Traditional Norwegian cure, packed in salt for about 20 hours (based on size of the cut) then smeared in honey and hung to dry in the sauna (oddly enough the coldest room in the house, also cat proof) for a week.

Never tried this before, was recommended by the guy who helped me sort out the carcass. Definitely successful.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-31-2016, 11:43 AM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,869
I just mixed up 10# of hamburger for this sausage, have it chilling now.
In researching some other receipies for dried, cured, and smoked sausage and meats,i happen across a similar product, almost the same but with a little allspice, and red wine added. The proportions of spices was also a little different, less salt, more coriander, less garlic... It had over 50% less salt, but including Prauge Powder #1 (why it wasn't #2 I don't know)... but still a 25% salt reduction. Since I had the powder, am not a big fan of too much salt anyhow, and have either a healthy fear or irrational fear of botulinum, I used that mix. I adjusted the spices between the 2 recipes based on my own tastes.

Stuffing tomorrow, then hang for a week....

Any recommendations or opinions on collegen vs sheep casings for this type of product?
__________________
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. ~Samuel Adams~
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-01-2017, 12:49 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,869
Got everything stuffed and hung. Rather than putting them in a box, I hung them on a wooden laundry rack, in a spare room, thats currently unheated, and between 40-50. The ceiling fan is providing air circulation. I draped an insect bar over everything after the pictures were taken.

I used 21mm edible colfan F colligen casings, a thin product not intended to be smoked, but rather for fresh sausages. I figured these would be good for a dry cured sausage. 21mm is about the diameter of linked breakfast sausages, a bit thicker that what one normal considers a snack stick... I'm assuming that they'll lose volume as they dry.

We'll see what happens in a week or so.
Attached Thumbnails
20170101_124042.jpg  
__________________
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. ~Samuel Adams~
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-06-2017, 02:32 PM
wccountryboy wccountryboy is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,869
It would appear that something went catastrophicly wrong... after 6 days, while the exterior is dried, the interior is still the consistency of raw ground beef, and there's a huge amount of grease in them....

My best guess is the 20% fat was too much for this process.... I'm going to throw them on the dehydrator for a while, and if I can get them up to temp, maybe salvage them...

If not, the dogs are in for a treat.
__________________
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. ~Samuel Adams~
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-11-2017, 12:05 AM
AndyC's Avatar
AndyC AndyC is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Age: 52
Posts: 6,078
Darn. Yeah, I didn't get that effect with my 15% fat hamburger - perhaps 20% is too much, as you said.
__________________
My Iraq Pics

Preferred Travel Agent - 72 Virgins Dating Club
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:06 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved