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  #1  
Old 10-27-2016, 07:08 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Lightbulb Colt Custom 38 Super 1911 High Polished

This shiny stainless 38 Super from the Colt Custom shop is back at its temporary home at a Houston pawn shop waiting to catch the eye of its soon to be happy future owner!















You can see more of my work at:
www.GunsPolishing.com
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  #2  
Old 10-27-2016, 07:12 PM
muzzleblast... muzzleblast... is offline
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Stunning work, as always.
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  #3  
Old 10-27-2016, 08:42 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Stunning work, as always.
Thanks! The Colts always come out nice
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  #4  
Old 10-30-2016, 12:47 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Very nice pistol. You have to admit though, whoever does the high-polished finish at Colt really knows how to do it. There's one of these brand-new at a local gun shop, and the surfaces are mirror-bright while all edges remain sharp and crisp. I'd love to have it but the shop wants about $1700 for it. By contrast there's a high-polish Remington R1S at another shop, and the thing has a lot of rounded edges on it. Of course it costs half what the Colt does. Kudos to Rob for turning out guns that look as good as what a Colt master polisher does but without the exorbitant price tag.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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Old 10-30-2016, 10:47 AM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Very nice pistol. You have to admit though, whoever does the high-polished finish at Colt really knows how to do it. There's one of these brand-new at a local gun shop, and the surfaces are mirror-bright while all edges remain sharp and crisp. I'd love to have it but the shop wants about $1700 for it. By contrast there's a high-polish Remington R1S at another shop, and the thing has a lot of rounded edges on it. Of course it costs half what the Colt does. Kudos to Rob for turning out guns that look as good as what a Colt master polisher does but without the exorbitant price tag.
Thanks, dsk. I have actually just tweaked my process a bit, which has allowed me to keep the edges noticeably sharper. I'll have some new photos in the next few days
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Old 11-16-2016, 06:07 AM
wc145 wc145 is offline
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Originally Posted by PatriotPolishing View Post
Thanks, dsk. I have actually just tweaked my process a bit, which has allowed me to keep the edges noticeably sharper. I'll have some new photos in the next few days
That's a big plus, one of the things that I've noticed about your work is the rounded edges, though this pistol looks much better. Nothing wrong with a carry melt, if you want it, but being able to keep those distinct lines, particularly on a polished 1911, make a huge difference in the appearance. The gun in this thread has a much cleaner look to it.
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  #7  
Old 11-25-2016, 09:07 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Originally Posted by wc145 View Post
That's a big plus, one of the things that I've noticed about your work is the rounded edges, though this pistol looks much better. Nothing wrong with a carry melt, if you want it, but being able to keep those distinct lines, particularly on a polished 1911, make a huge difference in the appearance. The gun in this thread has a much cleaner look to it.
Very well said! I agree 100%. You can see a few of those crisper edges on this Springfield 1911-A1 I polished recently: https://forums.1911forum.com/showthr...41#post8671841
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Old 11-26-2016, 09:14 PM
US1911 US1911 is offline
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The lines looks amazingly crisp. Your work continues to impress.
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  #9  
Old 11-27-2016, 12:01 AM
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I'm not a polishing expert nor do I play one on TV, but it seems to me the hardest part of a 1911 to polish and keep the edges/contours crisp are the scallops on the frame behind the trigger. It's a tiny area and on so many guns I see they're rounded off to where they've blended into the frame. It's usually the first thing I look at on a polished 1911 to see how good a job the polisher did.

BTW something I just noticed is how you improved on the factory appearance by smoothing out the raised edges of the rollmarks that Colt infamously leaves on all of their new guns.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.

Last edited by dsk; 11-27-2016 at 12:08 AM.
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  #10  
Old 12-05-2016, 06:37 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
I'm not a polishing expert nor do I play one on TV, but it seems to me the hardest part of a 1911 to polish and keep the edges/contours crisp are the scallops on the frame behind the trigger. It's a tiny area and on so many guns I see they're rounded off to where they've blended into the frame. It's usually the first thing I look at on a polished 1911 to see how good a job the polisher did.

BTW something I just noticed is how you improved on the factory appearance by smoothing out the raised edges of the rollmarks that Colt infamously leaves on all of their new guns.
The scallops are definitely one of the harder areas to prep and polish, so it is a wise call using them as a quick general guide to the quality of the polish job. Good catch, too, on noticing the smoothing out of the roll marks. I polished a Gold Cup Trophy today that had ridiculously high edges around the ejection-side lettering. I should have taken before/after photos to show the difference
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