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Old 06-07-2016, 08:08 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Exclamation Colt M1991A1 Mirror Polished

Here are a few photos of a Colt M1991A1 I finished up a few days ago. I knew that the MSH was plastic, but I was surprised to see that the trigger is as well. I saw that with one other Colt awhile ago, too, but I forget which model. The lightweight MSH makes sense, but what is the benefit of a plastic trigger over an aluminum one?


















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Old 06-07-2016, 08:16 PM
rfontes rfontes is offline
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Makes pimpin' easy
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Old 06-07-2016, 09:15 PM
Captain H Captain H is offline
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Wow, that looks fantastic. Nice job. The triggers on the ORM 1991's had plastic shoes like on that one. The newer 1991's have aluminum trigger shoes. The nice thing about the older plastic trigger shoes were that they didn't show wear on the sides where they press in and out of the frame slot like the newer aluminum ones do and they were smooth face.
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Old 06-07-2016, 09:19 PM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain H View Post
Wow, that looks fantastic. Nice job. The triggers on the ORM 1991's had plastic shoes like on that one. The newer 1991's have aluminum trigger shoes. The nice thing about the older plastic trigger shoes were that they didn't show wear on the sides where they press in and out of the frame slot like the newer aluminum ones do and they were smooth face.
Makes sense. Thanks for the info, sir.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:04 AM
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dsk dsk is offline
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I still continues to amaze me that some owners will pay for an exquisite polishing job like this but won't take the time to replace the cheap plastic parts on their gun first.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1946 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:54 AM
PatriotPolishing PatriotPolishing is offline
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I still continues to amaze me that some owners will pay for an exquisite polishing job like this but won't take the time to replace the cheap plastic parts on their gun first.
Boggles the mind, doesn't it? The owner of this 1991 is a Vietnam-Era Navy Corpsman* who didn't realize that the trigger was plastic. To his credit, he did immediately buy a stainless replacement and have it sent to me for polishing. By the time it arrived, though, I had already returned the pistol to him. Here are a few photos of the polished trigger... sans 1991







*For those who don't know, the Marine Corps is technically a department of the Navy, although we are considered a separate service branch. The USMC, unlike the U.S. Army, does not have its own medics. We instead employ Navy medics, known as Corpsmen (KOR-men), as our field medics. These men are the heroes of the heroes.
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