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  #1  
Old 07-14-2019, 11:37 AM
ken y ken y is online now
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Mauser K98K

Any fans out there, specifically the German models? I am now researching these for a possible future buy. Presently interested in a 1935 to 1945 year rifle, matching parts.

What are some of the most coveted models? And would a rifle with the duffle cut be a deal breaker for you? Any input on these would be appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2019, 01:04 PM
Sergio Natali Sergio Natali is offline
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I owned eight or nine of them as many years ago I used to collect them.
To me that's probably one of the most beautiful and better built rifle of all times.

I remember that for years I looked for "the original genuine all matching" K98K as that was my Holy Grail, until I discovered at my own expenses that in real life "genuine" and "all matching" never come together if we talk about MAUSER K98K .
The closer to being original genuine and all matching were those K98Ks made by MAUSER in 1937 and marked S/42 that Germany sent to Portugal as payment for raw materials.
More than one time I had to argue with "experts", that probably in good faith were swearing to own an "original matching K98K" I herd a lot of stories too... unfortunately every time after a careful hands on inspection we discovered that we were talking about pretty well made fakes.
IMHO
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Last edited by Sergio Natali; 07-14-2019 at 01:08 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-14-2019, 01:31 PM
ken y ken y is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by "colt45acp" View Post
I owned eight or nine of them as many years ago I used to collect them.
To me that's probably one of the most beautiful and better built rifle of all times.

I remember that for years I looked for "the original genuine all matching" K98K as that was my Holy Grail, until I discovered at my own expenses that in real life "genuine" and "all matching" never come together if we talk about MAUSER K98K .
The closer to being original genuine and all matching were those K98Ks made by MAUSER in 1937 and marked S/42 that Germany sent to Portugal as payment for raw materials.
More than one time I had to argue with "experts", that probably in good faith were swearing to own an "original matching K98K" I herd a lot of stories too... unfortunately every time after a careful hands on inspection we discovered that we were talking about pretty well made fakes.
IMHO
Thanks for the info! It is a shame how often fakes have infiltrated the collecting world.

Do you still own 1 or 2?
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  #4  
Old 07-14-2019, 07:25 PM
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tgt_usa tgt_usa is offline
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Out-of-date info [mostly]

Quote:
Originally Posted by ken y View Post
Any fans out there, specifically the German models? I am now researching these for a possible future buy. Presently interested in a 1935 to 1945 year rifle, matching parts.

What are some of the most coveted models? And would a rifle with the duffle cut be a deal breaker for you? Any input on these would be appreciated.
The K98 is a -great- rifle; but I bought mine to shoot ... not as a collectible. And chose it due to the highly available, very inexpensive, decent-quality ammunition. Not sure if that ammo is available nor if it’s inexpensive now. And based on your post, none of that may be of interest to you anyway.

But ... here’s my thought on a “duffle cut”: given a provenance, I’d be -more- interested in a genuine bring-home; without a provenance, much less ... anything that smells of fakery is a big turn-off. The duffle cut, with a decent repair job* wouldn’t affect shooting ... if that’s important. If a duffle cut were -unrepaired- I’d get a spare stock to shoot and the original to display ... which probably means never shooting it: too much trouble.


*- “decent” meaning structurally sound and not horribly ugly
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  #5  
Old 07-14-2019, 07:30 PM
ken y ken y is online now
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I definitely want to shoot it. At the same time I would like a real nice example of the K98k.
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  #6  
Old 07-20-2019, 05:24 PM
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tgt_usa tgt_usa is offline
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Rifle-caliber carbine

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Originally Posted by ken y View Post
I definitely want to shoot it. At the same time I would like a real nice example of the K98k.
The difference surpised me in how hard the rifles hit at the back end between the full-length and the karbine. My latest rifle-caliber carbine has taught me the value of a “LimbSaver”:

https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=991214
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  #7  
Old 07-25-2019, 11:05 AM
magazineman magazineman is offline
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What was the situation concerning matching numbers on the rifles used by German troops in WW2?

Were they usually a mix of different parts?

Because if so, then that's what I'd want. Because it would mean that my rifle more likely had historical use & significance than one that sat unused in a small backwater armory.

So to me, a legit battlefield-pickup / bring-back with visible wartime wear would be great. Heck, I sure wish I knew the whole story behind my Yugo Mauser!

Or look at it this way: Imagine an old Vietnam Tunnel Rat who wishes to sell the 1911 he used underground, complete with a snapshot of him, gun & flashlight in hand, crawling out of a tunnel.

Ya know, that gun would almost certainly be a non-numbers matching mixmaster after a few arsenal refinishes. Having maybe served in WW2 & Korea before 'Nam.

So.......... low value? Or the coolest 1911 ever?

Is the Lincoln derringer less desirable because it's not an unfired, New In Box example?

Is the Liberty Bell trash because it's cracked?

Yes, I get the appeal of having a very nice example. I'm just MORE into having one that, at one time, really mattered on the world stage.

Just my thoughts.
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  #8  
Old 07-27-2019, 01:14 PM
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arsenal re-built AND bring-home from WWII

Quote:
Originally Posted by magazineman View Post
What was the situation concerning matching numbers on the rifles used by German troops in WW2?

Were they usually a mix of different parts?
...
Arsenal rebuilds of the K98K are certainly encountered ... though the examples I’ve *seen* were Yugoslavian. The K98K was mass-produced too late (early- or mid-‘30s?) to have many years of service by ‘39 - ‘45. Full-length WWI rifles, G98s, -were- re-issued during WWII.

Mine are license-built and, as previously alluded, the G98 is a lot more fun to shoot. But a “LimbSaver” might get the K98K out more often to burn up some of that -cheap- ammo.
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  #9  
Old 09-12-2019, 01:50 AM
cyanghost cyanghost is offline
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I recently purchased one and I absolutely love it. Dare I say, I love it more than my M1 Garand. Mine is not all matching and appears to be Russian captured. But the stock, receiver and barrel have matching parts from 1940. The rest was random stuff from the time period, and some parts are electro penciled. Based on my _limited_ understanding and research, that generally means it was Russian captured, however I'm not certain of that.

When I was shopping around for a good K98K, my only requirement was that the receiver be German made. As luck would have it, the receiver, barrel and stock was manufactured by "237" aka Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik. (yes, I cut and pasted that company name from Wikipedia. )

I understand that the firearm was initially used by those on the wrong side of history, however that was long ago in the past. I think it's still good to appreciate the old firearms and perhaps give us a good reminder of our history and why we shouldn't repeat certain facets of it.

I tried to find some good American ammo at an acceptable price but was unable to. This proved be incredibly difficult and may not be a reasonable expectation considering the cartridge and the firearm aren't even American made or engineered. The only stuff I've tried so far was Prvi Partizan ammo found here.

I was concerned since I hadn't tried their ammo before but it actually functioned very well! It seems like it's well made and wasn't too dirty or anything. This wonderful firearm will be a keeper in my collection for the rest of my life! It's so fun to shoot and a real pleasure to own!
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  #10  
Old 09-12-2019, 06:58 PM
Viper_29 Viper_29 is offline
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I had a Russian pickup and rebuild for a few years, Russian capture I mean to say. I reloaded 8mm for it.
That's most of what's in the market, Russian captures and where you get the mix master /electro penciled parts, this is called 'force matched". The Germans numbered everything on these rifles but the Russians broke them down in piles and threw them back together. Though they remained high quality rifles, "matching" is very hard and commands a price. More likely an authentic matching rifle is a GI bringback.
Most of the Russian capture rifles have an X on the receiver, missing the capture screws, cleaning rod, and fr sight hood, with a red tint shellac on the stock which may be hardwood or laminate.
There are fake Waffen SS rifles out there. do NOT trust S and/or SS markings or fancy Waffenampt stories that are out there, it's very well known that stamps are avail and on the market to push prices up.

I would direct you to the gunboards forum to look at what's out there that you can buy with confidence.

You do NOT want a Mitchell's Mauser if you want anything that is remotely authentic. Mitchell's stripped the things to "new" status and ruined all the patina and collectability, etc etc that comes with a rifle of this type and the WWII years.
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  #11  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:03 PM
magazineman magazineman is offline
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ken y asked if there were any fans of the K98--------------

Well, a better question would be "is there anyone who is NOT a fan" among us gun guys.

Because these guns are so good I cannot imagine anyone NOT liking them.
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  #12  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:34 PM
MichaelE MichaelE is online now
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I parted with a bcd 43 last summer, non-matching. I'd had it for years and it shot very well. The bolt parts matched and the stock matched the action, but small parts were all over the map.

Wood was good and blueing was probably a re-blue but it looked pretty good.

I also had an OB 48 which is a Yugoslav Mauser without any marking other than serial numbers. Purportedly made in the early '50's. Mine was new in cosmoline and what a PITA that was to get out of it after sitting God knows how long in some overseas warehouse somewhere for decades.
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  #13  
Old 09-18-2019, 09:43 PM
ken y ken y is online now
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Update: I am in the process of purchasing one right now. WW2 era with a hardwood stock. I am a WW2 fanatic. I wish I owned a Tiger tank.

Can't wait to see it side by side with my M1 Garand.

I'll update again after I receive it.
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2019, 10:23 PM
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A WW2-era K.98k is on my bucket list of guns to get someday. Unfortunately I know nothing about them so I'd have to do a lot of research first before I dared to jump into the pool. It's a lot like collecting GI 1911s... there's a minefield of fake and embellished guns out there and you need to know what you're actually buying.
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Old 09-19-2019, 02:00 AM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
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Funny, everyone (and for the historical value they are right) seems to be after the German 8mm Mauser rifles...

I can't seem to do anything quite right and would be really happy if a very nice 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser fell into my grasp!
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Old 09-19-2019, 05:57 AM
MichaelE MichaelE is online now
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Don't we all!
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  #17  
Old 09-19-2019, 07:19 AM
ken y ken y is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
A WW2-era K.98k is on my bucket list of guns to get someday. Unfortunately I know nothing about them so I'd have to do a lot of research first before I dared to jump into the pool. It's a lot like collecting GI 1911s... there's a minefield of fake and embellished guns out there and you need to know what you're actually buying.
For sure! I am depending on people from a certain forum to help me out. I am buying from a guy with a stellar track record. Can't wait to receive it.
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  #18  
Old 09-21-2019, 07:47 PM
bayoned bayoned is offline
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Different people have different tastes in what they want out of a K98k.
Years, makers, etc.
However, if a rifle is 100% correct, original finish wood and metal, and matching numbers, then I don't care if it's duffle cut or not, provided the cut is under the rear band. (If anything, I think it's kind of a plus.....but that just me.)
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  #19  
Old 11-01-2019, 02:43 AM
pakaslinger pakaslinger is offline
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Mauser K98

I dearly love MIL-serp rifles. A Mauser K98, .303 British, 1903 Springfield, Mauser M95 Chilino. Did you check the bore? Is there any rusting or pitting? I guess some were shot out + had to be re-bored. But good purchase! I just love the Mauser action.
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Old 11-01-2019, 07:45 AM
ken y ken y is online now
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Here she is, better posting late than never, right? I love it and will probably acquire another.
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  #21  
Old 11-15-2019, 07:30 PM
RazorBurn RazorBurn is offline
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Love a Mauser and am lucky to have an all matching AX 41. If you want a true all matching example be prepared to shell out some major money. Also, there is a lot of faking on Mausers so it's a field where it's best to verify with experts. The guys on the K98k forum really know their stuff and I'd recommend verifying any rifle with them.

http://www.k98kforum.com/forum.php

Bolt mismatches are more common and you can save yourself some money if it doesn't have to be all matching by going that route. For a nice shooter a Russian capture isn't a bad idea nor is a another variant like and M48 or M24/47. They're great guns and a hoot to shoot.

My Erma AX 41.

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Old 11-15-2019, 11:07 PM
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Here she is, better posting late than never, right? I love it and will probably acquire another.
Looks like you scored big on that one. Congrats.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:06 PM
jjfitch jjfitch is online now
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We have an "Old Soldiers" match every month. It is really just a bunch of "grey beards" shooting for the love of the sport and keeping up the interest in these "Old Soldiers"!

Watching and listening to the "love fest" is inspiring.

My only old soldier is a pristine CMP M1 Garand that shoots like a "drill motor"!

I too have "bring homes" that my dad sent home. Both were barreled actions for the purpose of "sporterizing". A "star" gauge Springfield '03A3 and a K98. The Mauser was rebarreled to .243 Win. neither is anything special except they are shooters and have a little nostalgia value.

Originals would have made each special in their own ways.

Smiles,
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  #24  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:15 PM
squid8286 squid8286 is offline
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I have a Polish WZ-29 Mauser that was built at the Radom Arsenal in 1934. It is all matching from what I can tell, down to the stock. It has the Polish Eagle on the chamber. I'd like to think it fired some of the first shots in the defense of Poland when the Germans invaded, and was then probably commandeered at some point by the Germans, since it is almost identical to their K98. I think it's rarer than the near-identical German rifle, but not as sought after. I need to shoot the old thing. I never have, after having owned it for about 30 years. I reckon it's about time to give it a little bit of a workout.
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  #25  
Old 11-23-2019, 09:18 PM
Daveboone Daveboone is offline
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Dads, now my, deer rifle was a sporterized 1933 Oberndorf Banner Mauser, a pre war 98 that he picked up at his local hardware store in the fifties for little money. It is actually quite a desirable rifle, all matching but the barrel had been turned down to remove the military steps, bolt handle bent and original sights removed. Over a long slow up grade, I had it drilled and tapped, Timney trigger, sporterized push button trigger guard/ magazine installed, along with some finer metal work and a low swing 3 position safety. For me any other bolt action rifle is simply a wanna be. Of course it is far from military configuration, but it is honest to dads sporterized intention.
To back it up, a few years ago I picked up another 98 (this one a 1943 Austrian (Steyr armory if I recall?)again, all matching numbers, also sporterized, but some pretty ugly work had been done. Again not much collector value, but I decided to recreate a mid 1950s sporterized Mauser, complete with an appropriate Herters birdseye maple stock, and period correct Redfield scope and mount. It shoots! I love all Mausers, but I have s soft spot for these sporters.
Keep your eyes open, garage sales, out of the way flea markets, etc. there are still bargains to be had. the Austrian 98 I paid 100 bucks for.
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