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  #1  
Old 05-28-2020, 03:40 AM
gdomingo gdomingo is offline
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Norinco M1911A1

Good day all. I am new to the forum but not new to the 1911 platform. I bought my Norinco 1911 in 1996 and simply love this pistol. Sadly I haven't shot that much, only about 200 rounds in total. I would love to customize my pistol. I have already done a new skeletonized trigger. Would love to add a commander hammer, but without working on the frame. Hench keeping the standard grip safety. Just a thought. Love to hear from you all.
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  #2  
Old 05-28-2020, 07:45 PM
Hawkeye fan Hawkeye fan is offline
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Welcome from Las Vegas.
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  #3  
Old 05-28-2020, 10:04 PM
Piexcel Piexcel is offline
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Welcome aboard!! Present your question in the "Other 1911's" subforum, and you will get many responses. Posting a few pics will be good too!
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  #4  
Old 05-30-2020, 03:46 PM
farscott farscott is offline
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I have had mixed results with the Norinco guns. One I bought stock went back to the seller the next day as the barrel lugs were being peened by the slide. I also have a pair of customs built on Norinco base guns, one from EGW, that are excellent.

The latter pistols came to me complete. One was done by EGW, and the second was made as a copy by a smith local to the seller. The EGW pistol, as expected, is a bit more refined, especially with the dehorn. Both pistols retain only the Norinco frame and slide, with every other part replaced. The slides and "touch parts" have been been finished in hard chrome and the frames are finished with Cerakote. Sights are Novak, barrels are Ed Brown, grips are G10, and most other parts are CMC, EGW, or Ed Brown.

If these pistols were done on Colt frames and slides, the price would be much higher and the value lower. The purchase price for the pair was much less than the cost of the base pistols, let alone the parts and labor needed to customize them. In fact, the purchase price was less per pistol than retail, not MSRP, for a new 1991A1 or SA Loaded.
Attached Thumbnails
Custom_Norinco_Brace_1.jpg   Custom_Norinco_Brace_2.jpg  
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Last edited by farscott; 05-31-2020 at 05:21 AM.
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  #5  
Old 05-31-2020, 11:56 PM
gdomingo gdomingo is offline
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Thank you all for your welcomes and replies. Here is some pictures of my Norinco M1911.
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  #6  
Old 06-25-2020, 11:08 PM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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My norc 1911/45acp is the most accurate 1911 I have. It was ridden hard and put away wet. Even the barrel bushing was more loose in the slide than the barrel fit. I wanted a project 1911 platform. My first one. I wanted to do a cheap build using the cheapest bargain basement new parts I could buy. Cdnnsports national match barrel bushing $15, SPG USGI surplus military barrel $59. FLGR kit with 18# spring $9. I had all the 1911 tools from brownells. I polished the feed ramp till the machine marks were gone, added a disconnector ramp, fitted the nm bushing till the wrench was needed for a snug fit not tight. The lug engagement is perfect. No barrel spring in both directions. I hand lapped the barrel into the nm bushing for a 100% loc up in full battery. She shoots cloverleafs and clusters at 25 yds using wolf ammo. Cheap build, it’s my workmanship.

I’m a class A machine builder, auto mechanic, lead eng tech. I like working on guns. No 200,000 lb machines to work on.
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  #7  
Old 06-26-2020, 02:21 AM
green papaya green papaya is offline
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Norinco canada?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdomingo View Post
Thank you all for your welcomes and replies. Here is some pictures of my Norinco M1911.
is your NORINCO bought in CANADA? I dont think the US imports didnt have the flared ejection port?
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  #8  
Old 06-26-2020, 10:44 AM
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RickB RickB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdomingo View Post
Would love to add a commander hammer, but without working on the frame. Hench keeping the standard grip safety. Just a thought. Love to hear from you all.
Installing a new hammer may require refitting or replacing the thumb safety; thumb safeties are always hand-fitted to the combination of hammer and sear, and changing either of those two parts can alter the relationship and require refitting of the safety.
You can retain your grip safety, but it will have to be modified to create clearance for the hammer ring; find a pic here on the site of a Colt "rat tail" grip safety, and you'll see what the modification looks like.
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  #9  
Old 07-02-2020, 08:23 PM
VIS35 VIS35 is offline
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My very early ( ca. 1981 ) import. There's nothing but positive comments I can say about this Mil-Spec. 1911.

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  #10  
Old 07-02-2020, 10:49 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Did you by chance mean 1991? The first magazine article on the Norinco 1911s was around that time by Jan Libourel in Handguns magazine.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #11  
Old 07-03-2020, 09:46 AM
VIS35 VIS35 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Did you by chance mean 1991? The first magazine article on the Norinco 1911s was around that time by Jan Libourel in Handguns magazine.
My bad. Yes, 1991, around the first year of import.
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  #12  
Old 07-03-2020, 11:39 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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I was gonna say. In 1981 we were still complaining about cheap crap from Japan, not cheap crap from China.

Seriously, I remember during the 1980s while working at a hardware store that most cheap tools and electronics came from either Hong Kong or Taiwan. It wasn't until the mid 1990s that everything started coming from mainland China instead. In the early '80s the Chinese were still pedaling around Beijing on bicycles in their blue communist party uniforms and calling us Yankee capitalist dogs. Then just ten years later they were selling TVs and computers to us Yankee dogs and getting filthy rich off of it.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #13  
Old 07-04-2020, 09:34 AM
gdomingo gdomingo is offline
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I bought my Norinco in South Africa in November 1996.
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  #14  
Old 07-07-2020, 01:41 AM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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Norinco makes some quality clones of USA weapons. The m14 and 1911 are two of them.
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  #15  
Old 07-10-2020, 04:43 PM
rug357 rug357 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIS35 View Post
My very early ( ca. 1981 ) import. There's nothing but positive comments I can say about this Mil-Spec. 1911.

I have had 3 Norinco 1911 pistols since 1992 and have had mixed experiences.
First one I purchased was a little clunky but shot very nice. It was very accurate but no worse than Colt 1911s of that time. I shot it for a while and then put it away as I enjoyed my other pistols. Short time later I got a second one from a private purchase. It was new in box and similar in quality to the first one. First time I took this pistol out and cleaned it I noticed some peening on the barrel lug and slide lug. About a thousand rounds later peening looked severe so I stopped shooting it. Sometime later I sold it to a local gunsmith at a loss. Finally I got a third one in a trade...again new in box never shot. This one developed minor peening on the lugs but didn't continue to get worse. I ended up fixing this one on my own and eventually traded it away for a Glock 26.

One thing I noticed about all 3 Norincos I had...they had that uneven curve line on the right side of frame grip just below the magazine release. You can see it on this picture.
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  #16  
Old 07-12-2020, 06:39 AM
gdomingo gdomingo is offline
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Thank you very much for sharing your experience with me.
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2020, 10:00 AM
1911crazy 1911crazy is offline
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The Chinese at norinco are focused on making clones of us weapons and Russian weapons too. The Russians taught the Chinese how to do the chrome lined bores and chambers.
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