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  #26  
Old 12-17-2019, 09:55 PM
seagiant seagiant is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megafiddle View Post
These wire gauges were made from music wire. They range from .008" to .022" in .001" increments, plus .024" and .026".

I made the handles from 1/4" poplar, printed some labels to affix onto them, and covered them with clear heat shrink tubing. The wires were crimped on the end to hold them in place, and set into a 1/16" hole with super glue.

These are useful on curved surface gaps like that between the barrel and slide at linkdown.

Hi,
Those are pretty neat!

Where did you get the music wire in all those sizes???
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  #27  
Old 12-18-2019, 02:10 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
Hi,
Those are pretty neat!

Where did you get the music wire in all those sizes???
Thanks!

Those are made from ghs plain guitar strings from juststrings.com

75 cents each.

Some music stores also carry some of those sizes.

One could also just bend a loop in one end and glue a folded piece of card stock over the loop. I happened to have everything I needed laying around though, and got a little carried away.

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Last edited by megafiddle; 12-18-2019 at 02:14 PM.
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  #28  
Old 12-18-2019, 05:10 PM
seagiant seagiant is online now
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Hi
Thanks!
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  #29  
Old 12-18-2019, 05:54 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
Hi
Made this today.

I see these 1911 bench blocks and the only thing on them that spiked my interest...

Was the Thumb Safety part that allows you to set the thumb safety up to file the lug where it fits the sear.

This keeps your cut at the right angle and holds the safety for you.
Nice!

What amount of offset did you use between the hole and the slot?

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  #30  
Old 12-21-2019, 08:22 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Rockefeller View Post
I like that one! Do you have a dimensioned drawing or sketch you could share?

I have a drawing finished, more or less. Hope it's useful.

Some notes:

The material is 6061 aluminum bar stock, 5/8" x 2".

The .209" dia hole was sized for clamping the frame at the slide stop hole with a 10-32 machine screw thread. Size this as required for the clamping screw.

The .250" dia hole was sized for clamping the frame at the magazine well with a 6mm machine screw thread. Size this as required for the clamping screw.

Location for only two holes shown. The other two holes are symmetrical about the centerline with the dimensioned holes.

The fixture is sized for a vise with 1" high vise jaws. Use wider bar stock for taller vise jaws.



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Attached Thumbnails
frame_rail_fixture.jpg  
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  #31  
Old 12-21-2019, 08:58 PM
Bob Rockefeller Bob Rockefeller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megafiddle View Post
I have a drawing finished, more or less. Hope it's useful.
Thanks! I will probably take a crack at this for myself.
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  #32  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:11 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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These photos show more detail in the hammer hook fixture:

The fixture is built on a 2" x 2" precision angle plate and is bolted directly onto the mill table.

The hammer sits on a .156" pin which is set into the top left side of the plate. The hole in the top center is threaded for the 10-32 clamping screw. On the top right is an indentation for locating a counter tensioning screw which is threaded into the clamping bar. The tensioning screw is adjusted to provide solid parallel contact between the hammer and clamping bar.

The angled aluminum bar with the adjusting screw was added to help in adjusting the hook angle, and help secure the hammer against movement.







I also made a "leveling ram" to align the hammer hook shelf square with the spindle:

The ram is made from precision 3/8" aluminum rod and was face turned in the mill in a 3/8" collet. The lathe bit was clamped in a small vise mounted on the mill table. I had to place a mirror face up on the table to see what I was doing. It worked well.

In use, the ram is lowered firmly against the hammer hook shelf to align the hammer, and the clamp is tightened.






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Attached Thumbnails
hammer_fixture_010.jpg   hammer_fixture_011.jpg   leveling_ram_01.jpg   leveling_ram_02.jpg  

Last edited by megafiddle; 12-23-2019 at 11:26 PM.
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  #33  
Old 12-24-2019, 07:24 AM
jglenn jglenn is offline
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Excellent idea with the alignment ram. Not my idea, but i align my barrel's lower lugs for cutting on my mill with a .198 pin guage held in a collet on my mill. Dykem and spinning the pin a low speed show the alignment on the feet. Works quickly and is accurate.. Jerry Keefer showed this method on the bullseye forum when he was still with us.
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  #34  
Old 12-24-2019, 02:30 PM
SV 22 SV 22 is offline
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Here are a couple tools I have made. They were simple projects that helped me learn to do various operations on a mill and lathe. From left to right, a barrel alignment tool, a front strap checkering fixture, and a slide serrating fixture.

The barrel alignment tool goes in the firing pin channel to mark play dough in an empty case when fitting the upper lugs. A firing pin does the same thing, but gets stuck and doesn't have a handle.

The front strap checkering guide is what I use for laying out the horizontal lines. The slide serrating fixture goes in the slide rails so that I have a guide for serrating the back of a slide.
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_1283.JPG  
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  #35  
Old 01-25-2020, 03:06 AM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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This is really simple but has been very useful.

Working on the trigger, hammer, sear, disconnector, etc, can require repeated installation and removal of the mainspring housing. This pin replaces the mainspring housing pin and can be inserted and removed without tools.

It's made from a 1" length of .156" drill rod. The milled flat clears the mainspring pin retainer, and so requires no force to insert or remove. It's only necessary to press the mainspring housing upward slightly to relieve the tension on the frame.

The 1/8" protrusion from either side of the frame allows it to be easily pushed out and grasped for removal.

Attached Thumbnails
mainspring_housing_assy _pin.jpg  
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  #36  
Old 01-25-2020, 05:38 AM
Prange Prange is offline
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I have alot of respect for all the machinists and tool and die-makers. Thanks for sharing.
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  #37  
Old 03-18-2020, 09:06 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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This fixture is used for cutting frame rails to width.

The front of the frame is clamped to the angle plate with a machine screw through the slide stop hole. The rear of the frame is clamped with a 1/2" x 3/4" aluminum bar inside the magazine well. A brass pin (not visible) fits into the upper grip bushing hole to locate the rear of the frame on the plate.

One of the advantages of having the frame vertical is that both rails can be indicated to make sure that both rails are as parallel to the table travel as possible. This helps insure that the rails will be cut along their entire length. In this case, only .002" was removed from each rail. The excess metal to be removed must be as uniform as possible along both rails. The rails will also be perfectly parallel after being cut, as this is inherent in the movement of the mill table.

Another advantage of fixturing the frame vertically is that the slide can be trial fitted to the frame during the rail cutting process. When the frame is set in a fixture horizontal, the setup and indication is much more difficult if the rails are to be left exposed for trial fitting. The horizontal fixtures that provide inherent setup accuracy do not leave both rails exposed.



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Last edited by megafiddle; 03-19-2020 at 10:31 AM.
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  #38  
Old 03-19-2020, 09:45 AM
papa1 papa1 is offline
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I tend to make jigs and fixtures for myself when necessity dictates it as I'm sure most of you do as well. Plus I can control tolerances which is very important in some regards.
Small aluminum block quick check of spacing and parallelism of sear and hammer pin holes.
Make my own barrel hood alignment blocks depending on slide rail spacing.
A lot of times though my tool maker's vice does the job nicely from holding hammers for stoning hook faces or reducing hook height to setting up slides on the bench then placing in mill vice, holding slides to knock out sights to pressing in small pins when part holding is needed to avoid damage. I generally do not trust myself to hold things in my hands and work them square, so for me fixturing is key.
Attached Thumbnails
Resized_20180622_180620.jpeg   Resized_20190810_090632.jpeg   Resized_20141025_155505.jpeg  
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  #39  
Old 03-23-2020, 12:02 PM
seagiant seagiant is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megafiddle View Post
Nice!

What amount of offset did you use between the hole and the slot?

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Hi,
Sorry, just noticed this.

I measure .080 off set center to center.

Take your safety and check it out.

You have to drill the shaft hole so it keeps the lug just high enough to be able to swipe with a file!
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  #40  
Old 03-23-2020, 10:15 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
Hi,
Sorry, just noticed this.

I measure .080 off set center to center.

Take your safety and check it out.

You have to drill the shaft hole so it keeps the lug just high enough to be able to swipe with a file!
No problem. Thanks!

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  #41  
Old 03-23-2020, 10:36 PM
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epj epj is offline
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1911 sight pushers
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Click image for larger version

Name:	63E50BF4-59E4-467B-B530-379DBE8F225E.jpeg
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ID:	578046
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  #42  
Old 03-30-2020, 11:30 AM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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(I'm reposting this to see if an attachment works better; the image I inserted in the earlier post disappeared)

This fixture is used for cutting frame rails to width.

The front of the frame is clamped to the angle plate with a machine screw through the slide stop hole. The rear of the frame is clamped with a 1/2" x 3/4" aluminum bar inside the magazine well. A brass pin (not visible) fits into the upper grip bushing hole to locate the rear of the frame on the plate.

One of the advantages of having the frame vertical is that both rails can be indicated to make sure that both rails are as parallel to the table travel as possible. This helps insure that the rails will be cut along their entire length. In this case, only .002" was removed from each rail. The excess metal to be removed must be as uniform as possible along both rails. The rails will also be perfectly parallel after being cut, as this is inherent in the movement of the mill table.

Another advantage of fixturing the frame vertically is that the slide can be trial fitted to the frame during the rail cutting process. When the frame is set in a fixture horizontal, the setup and indication is much more difficult if the rails are to be left exposed for trial fitting. The horizontal fixtures that provide inherent setup accuracy do not leave both rails exposed.

Click image for larger version

Name:	frame_rail_fixture_03.jpg
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ID:	578774
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  #43  
Old 03-30-2020, 06:39 PM
DesmoAndrew DesmoAndrew is offline
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Nothing special here, just some home gamer tools. Made the hammer/sear block to GI specs ... a useful starting point to look at engagement fits. The small saddle fits in a slide bushing area to help guide the slide lug polish tool and keep it mostly parallel to the slide lug area.
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  #44  
Old 04-26-2020, 09:25 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is online now
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I used to use an empty case with no primer to view the firing pin port alignment. Then I discovered that the flash hole can be off center.

So I made these firing pin port sighters from Delrin acetyl, one for 9mm and one for .45. Rather than turn a taper, I simply turned two concentric cylindrical sections. The forward section fits close at the front of the chamber, and the rearward section fits close just forward of the barrel ramp. A small indentation at the rear face center is marked with a small dot.

The firing pin port sighters, one of each, 9mm and .45:

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The sighters sitting in the barrels:

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White Delrin is slightly translucent. With the slide upside down, a strong light just above the barrel ramp diffuses into the acetyl, providing a backlight behind the center dot:

Click image for larger version

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