Bought my first press - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-20-2019, 12:51 AM
gregorym gregorym is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 73
Bought my first press

I have no questions or problems. This is more like a range review for my new Dillon XL650. Call it a garage review

So, everyone said get a single stage for your first press, but I didn't listen. I went with the 650 and couldn't be happier. I ordered it from a local dealer a couple of weeks back and added the strong mount, roller handle, case feeder and carbide .45 auto three die set.

Assembly and setup was easier than I expected and I had 45 completed rounds of .45 after dinner (I made a few dummy rounds first with no powder or primer using some small primer cases to get COAL and crimp right). I fired a bunch the next morning. They fed fine and were fairly soft shooting which I was expecting from that load. I loaded up another 200 that afternoon.

I had never reloaded before and never set up a press but I had done a lot of research, spoken with friends who reload and got some advice about which press to buy. One friend with two Hornady Lock n' Load APs told me, just buy the Dillon. Honestly, if you are mechanically inclined, detail oriented, do your research first and Read-The-Fine-Manual it's a fairly painless process.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-20-2019, 02:08 AM
markm markm is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northwest
Posts: 2,267
It's a sweet machine isn't it, had mine for over twenty year and use it constantly.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-20-2019, 05:23 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 7,832
First reloading press....

I recommend a first time reloader to use a progressive press also, but my recommendation is the D550, since it may also be used as a singe stage press since it doesn't automatically rotate the shell plate. A new user can go as slow or fast as they desire. A person that does his research and has some good mechanical aptitude should have no issues by starting with a D650....

Although I do most of my loading on a D1050, I use the D550 for making experimental loads, and also for making my rifle ammo. I have quite a few extra tool heads with pre-set dies for my D550, and two extra tool heads with pre-set dies for my D1050 so I can load 9mm, .40S&W, and .38 super without having to change anything but the tool head......this required some slight modifications to the D1050, but it works fine...Ö I can swap out the tool head to any of the above calibers on my D1050 in roughly 5 minutes or less.....
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 06-20-2019, 06:03 AM
Nitro.45 Nitro.45 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 6,378
👏
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-20-2019, 07:30 AM
yeti yeti is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,019
Good decision. Enjoy the new XL650!
__________________

NRA Life Member
RSO
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-20-2019, 10:26 AM
gregorym gregorym is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 73
Rwehavingfunyet, the 550 was high on my list as well. One of my first brushes with reloading was listening to a USPSA GM talk a friend through die setup on a DL 550 at a dinner party. Half the men at the party ended up in the garage oohing and ahhing over that press ��

I eventually chose the XL650 because I knew I'd want the extra station. I will either put a powder check at station 3 or a mini mr. Bullet feeder. If I go with the bullet feeder I'm thinking I'd adding a small camera and LED so I can see the powder in each case.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-20-2019, 10:33 AM
Murphy's Law Murphy's Law is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 517
I utilize the 500c but you did well "grasshopper" and will be enjoying reloading for a long long time to come.
__________________
It is better to be silent and thought a fool then to speak up and remove all doubts.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-20-2019, 12:24 PM
mikld mikld is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: So. Oregon
Posts: 1,110
When I help/mentor a new reloader I suggest he/she learn to reload, rather than operate an ammo machine. It's called K.I.S.S. When I was working with apprentices in an Auto Electrician apprenticeship program, I didn't start them with advanced computer controlled fuel delivery, but with plain old 12 DC electrics. They got a good grasp, a base that will last their entire career...

Progressive presses don't fit my lifestyle as I like reloading and don't have any need to rush through anything, but if I were try, I certainly would go with a Dillon 650. A friend was shooting in competition, 45 ACP, and I helped out operating is 650 a couple times. Good press...
__________________
My Anchor is holding fast...
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-20-2019, 01:56 PM
flechero flechero is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 3,109
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorym View Post
I have no questions or problems. This is more like a range review for my new Dillon XL650. Call it a garage review

So, everyone said get a single stage for your first press, but I didn't listen. I went with the 650 and couldn't be happier. I ordered it from a local dealer a couple of weeks back and added the strong mount, roller handle, case feeder and carbide .45 auto three die set.

Assembly and setup was easier than I expected and I had 45 completed rounds of .45 after dinner (I made a few dummy rounds first with no powder or primer using some small primer cases to get COAL and crimp right). I fired a bunch the next morning. They fed fine and were fairly soft shooting which I was expecting from that load. I loaded up another 200 that afternoon.

I had never reloaded before and never set up a press but I had done a lot of research, spoken with friends who reload and got some advice about which press to buy. One friend with two Hornady Lock n' Load APs told me, just buy the Dillon. Honestly, if you are mechanically inclined, detail oriented, do your research first and Read-The-Fine-Manual it's a fairly painless process.
Congrats on the press and welcome to reloading!

My first press was a 550 and other than model, my experience was remarkably similar to yours. NO issues and was making quality ammo the first morning.

I've since added some single stages- 1 dedicated to the garage and decapping, a Co-Ax for Rifle and a classic cast for odds and ends indoors.
__________________
-flechero
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-20-2019, 01:59 PM
RetiredRod's Avatar
RetiredRod RetiredRod is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Springfield, Missouri
Posts: 14,192
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikld View Post
When I help/mentor a new reloader I suggest he/she learn to reload, rather than operate an ammo machine.
Good press...
In my experience and opinion, those two things are not mutually exclusive.
__________________


NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-20-2019, 02:11 PM
JayhawkNavy02 JayhawkNavy02 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,058
Best approach IMO, get a 550 AND a 650...lol. I still use single stages for precision work, no reason not to have them all. 1050 is next!
__________________
Distinguished Pistol #388

Last edited by JayhawkNavy02; 06-20-2019 at 02:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-20-2019, 02:28 PM
GT40DOC GT40DOC is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Az
Posts: 5,570
I can't imagine being without my 650.....congrats to the OP.
__________________
NRA LIFE MEMBER
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-20-2019, 03:16 PM
Road_Clam Road_Clam is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Southern NH
Posts: 61
Well op you jumped right into the deep end of the pool. If your comfortable then youre gtg. Me, i did not feel comfortable with the complexity of the 650 when i was shopping for a faster method loading handgun. I opted to go with the LEE Classic Turret , then after about 4 years of making mistakes , and learning i moved up to the Dillon. The Dillons are outstanding presses but theres a deep learning curve to get them to run perfect. I was happy to have a solid baseline of loading handgun prior to purchasing my 650. It just made the learning curve less stressfull.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-20-2019, 04:38 PM
markm markm is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northwest
Posts: 2,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayhawkNavy02 View Post
Best approach IMO, get a 550 AND a 650...lol. I still use single stages for precision work, no reason not to have them all. 1050 is next!
Yes I still have a single stage press that I use for precision rifle and things the GRX, 45 shotshells and the like.
I always think about getting a 1050 but other than swaging primers I can't see the draw.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-20-2019, 05:06 PM
Capt. Methane Capt. Methane is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The South
Posts: 8,865
An excellent choice! Be safe out there.
__________________
The Second Amendment-America's Homeland Security!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-20-2019, 05:07 PM
kimberguy2004 kimberguy2004 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,158
My first press was a Lee Loadmaster that I kept 30 days. Bought a 650 and over the years I have loaded tens of thousands of handgun rounds with it. I did not buy a single stage until I started loading rifle calibers and now I have the Rock Chucker and a Redding T-7.
There's no reason to start with a single stage. The process is the same regardless and you can be as inattentive with a single stage as a progressive.
You get the tool that does the job. If you shoot competition pistol, you are going to spend some long hours at that single stage press.
__________________
Socialism is a great idea until the achievers run out of money..
Bitter Gun Owner
Bitter Clinger
Armed Infidel
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-20-2019, 06:38 PM
Intervention1 Intervention1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 293
I went thru the same thing last November, everyone said 550 and I said 650, I won. I have never reloaded either just read everything I could, read the forums, read the manual and my reloading handbook. Everything has been as smooth as silk, loaded about 5000 rounds so far 40, 45 ACP, 45 Colt, .223, 30-40 Krag and 308. If your new and your serious make the 650 decision, you will be glad in the end.

Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-20-2019, 06:45 PM
Intervention1 Intervention1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayhawkNavy02 View Post
Best approach IMO, get a 550 AND a 650...lol. I still use single stages for precision work, no reason not to have them all. 1050 is next!
David Tubbs and John Widden Champions of long-range shooting load their ammo on the Dillon XL 650 with John Widden's floating toolheads. No need for a single stage!

https://www.whiddengunworks.com/floa...lon-toolheads/


Last edited by Intervention1; 06-20-2019 at 06:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-20-2019, 09:05 PM
DubfromGa DubfromGa is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Georgia
Age: 51
Posts: 3,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorym View Post
I have no questions or problems. This is more like a range review for my new Dillon XL650. Call it a garage review

So, everyone said get a single stage for your first press, but I didn't listen. I went with the 650 and couldn't be happier. I ordered it from a local dealer a couple of weeks back and added the strong mount, roller handle, case feeder and carbide .45 auto three die set.

Assembly and setup was easier than I expected and I had 45 completed rounds of .45 after dinner (I made a few dummy rounds first with no powder or primer using some small primer cases to get COAL and crimp right). I fired a bunch the next morning. They fed fine and were fairly soft shooting which I was expecting from that load. I loaded up another 200 that afternoon.

I had never reloaded before and never set up a press but I had done a lot of research, spoken with friends who reload and got some advice about which press to buy. One friend with two Hornady Lock n' Load APs told me, just buy the Dillon. Honestly, if you are mechanically inclined, detail oriented, do your research first and Read-The-Fine-Manual it's a fairly painless process.








Outstanding.


Glad to hear your press "range report".

I'm just getting back into reloading after a 12+ year absence.

Prior experience was with a single stage rolling out accurate hunting rounds.

Went with an XL650 this time. All my initial gear is now here and just waiting on me to get some time off to work with it: Ultramount, roller handle, scale, press, 3 dedicated toolheads with dies & powder measures for: 9mm, .45acp & 44mag.

I'm looking forward to getting with it. I think I'll give .30'06 & .308win a try on it, too.....probably after I get a case feeder for it.



Congrats on you gear and smooth set up and getting some rounds downrange.
__________________
Proud to be a Deplorable.....
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-21-2019, 05:01 AM
VF-1 VF-1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: East Missouri
Posts: 1,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorym View Post
I have no questions or problems. This is more like a range review for my new Dillon XL650. Call it a garage review

So, everyone said get a single stage for your first press, but I didn't listen. I went with the 650 and couldn't be happier. I ordered it from a local dealer a couple of weeks back and added the strong mount, roller handle, case feeder and carbide .45 auto three die set.

Assembly and setup was easier than I expected and I had 45 completed rounds of .45 after dinner (I made a few dummy rounds first with no powder or primer using some small primer cases to get COAL and crimp right). I fired a bunch the next morning. They fed fine and were fairly soft shooting which I was expecting from that load. I loaded up another 200 that afternoon.

I had never reloaded before and never set up a press but I had done a lot of research, spoken with friends who reload and got some advice about which press to buy. One friend with two Hornady Lock n' Load APs told me, just buy the Dillon. Honestly, if you are mechanically inclined, detail oriented, do your research first and Read-The-Fine-Manual it's a fairly painless process.
Very nice, Greg! Love the BLUE! I havenít Stepped up to the 650 yet, but itís probably in the stars. I currently have a SDB, RL450, and RL550. Great choice on your part! Congratulations!!
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-21-2019, 05:51 AM
JayhawkNavy02 JayhawkNavy02 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intervention1 View Post
David Tubbs and John Widden Champions of long-range shooting load their ammo on the Dillon XL 650 with John Widden's floating toolheads. No need for a single stage!
I have been part of a military shooting team and competed at the national level for pistol many times (haven’t won yet so it’s not impressive, but I have met other much more talented and successful shooters than myself. I also have and use Whidden heads on my 650. IMO there is and will always be, a reason to have a single stage for me. I talked to John Whidden last week and he agrees, BTW he also has a Forster Co-Ax single stage press. I also believe Dave Tubbs uses a 550 not a 650 to load on, or at least has done so primarily in the past, but absolutely with the Whidden tool head. Could be wrong.

You can verify on the YouTube link below about John Whidden
https://youtu.be/Qd583ZMYncE.
And David Tubbs here: http://www.davidtubb.com/index.php?r...download_id=46

I use a Lee breech lock single stage for prep work and another single stage for production of test ammo. It’s easier for me when I want to go 1 round at a time to make sure I control the process in small lots before I transition to the 650 for higher output. It allows me to measure every powder throw on a lab scale and each round’s dimension to ensure they’re as identical as possible before testing in rest or fixture. It also saves time with messing with the progressive when I’m making a series of changes. Its usually just 10 rounds per test and I'll take 5-10 different loads to the range with me. For example changing the same load but using large and small pistol primers to see if there is an improvement (or not) with all other factors held equal. You also can’t control the primer seating depth on the 550/650 unlike the Forster Co-Ax. The Co-Ax also floats the die and shell plate both.

FWIW, reloading shop for the most successful shooting Team in America, the AMU, and a large source of our Olympians. You’ll notice there are still single stage presses in use . There are two full time staff, one a precision rifle Olympian who has medaled and the other a pistol champion. Very knowledgeable folks.

I will always have and use a single stage


Last edited by JayhawkNavy02; 06-21-2019 at 10:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 06-21-2019, 11:10 AM
mikld mikld is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: So. Oregon
Posts: 1,110
Quote:
Originally Posted by RetiredRod View Post
In my experience and opinion, those two things are not mutually exclusive.
When beginning to reload, if one uses a press that does one operation at a time, they are learning what every step does and why. When operating a progressive press, one pulls a handle and a few things/steps happen simultaneously, and a loaded cartridge drops out in a tray. Personally I don't care what kind of press one uses, but it is a disservice to new reloaders to be told learning on a progressive is just fine. If a newer reloader has a high mechanical ability, there maybe few problems. But how does a new reloader, using/learning on a progressive learn to troubleshoot defective ammo?

Just my experience teaching mechanical and electrical stuff for 15+ years...
__________________
My Anchor is holding fast...
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-21-2019, 11:38 AM
flechero flechero is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 3,109
for rifle yes, pistol not so much.

mikld- Your disservice comment would be more accurate if the press arrived with dies installed and perfectly adjusted... if one reads loading manuals and press/die set up instructions and tests each station as they go, taking measurements as you would in either scenario, the act of pulling the handle 3 extra times per round teaches them little.

And in the case of a 550 (which is what I'm familiar with) you can absolutely run 1 at a time or run each station individually as you would load on a SS. You can weigh each charge and not disrupt the loading sequence if you choose.

Your SS preference is clear, but if we are talking about common pistol calibers, there are plenty of people that have started with progressive and had no more problems than those on a SS. Plenty of guys here have posted about crimp, seat or consistency issues on a SS press, just as they have with other types.


If you are talking about rifle, then I would agree a SS makes more sense up front.
__________________
-flechero
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-21-2019, 12:20 PM
Oldfut808 Oldfut808 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Waipahu, HI
Posts: 1,981
Gregory
Congratulations on your decision.
You bypassed the Chevrolet and went for the Cadillac.
__________________
"What, Me Worry?"
NRA/Patron/Instructor/RSO
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-21-2019, 10:19 PM
july19 july19 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: NW Washington, the San Juans
Posts: 3,400
Congrats on the new 650. I’m no expert on all progressive machines but I wouldn’t be willing to give up my 650. I still have a Rock Chucker II, I plan to keep it too.
__________________

Cranberry Lake Militia
1953 side-by-side cork gun
1-A, 1968 - 1977
Womb? Weary? He rests. He has traveled.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:47 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved