Press advice. - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-31-2017, 04:49 PM
Irish7Blood Irish7Blood is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 4
Press advice.

Hey guys, long time snooper to the forum but this is my first post.

I'm finishing up on my 1911 .45acp build project and started pricing ammo, and wow is it a pretty penny.
So I'm going to start reloading, I understand the basics and perhaps even a little more, as I have been around the process a decent amount and read a few manuals though by no means am I an expert.

Anyways, it's close to time to buy my own gear and I can't decide on a press. (Links on the bottom).
First off, I am not a competition shooter. Probably the farthest from it.
I'm mainly focused on loading .40 and .45acp (though wouldn't mind having the option of loading rifle casing as well) and don't normally go through a lot of ammo in one shooting.

With that said, I'm trying to decide on some type of single stage (probably a RCBS Special-5) or go with a turret style press (looking at the Lee Classic 4 turret).
My "budget" is around the $150 mark, cheaper is better but quality is the most important.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/731667/rcbs-reloader-special-5-single-stage-press

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/814175/lee-classic-4-hole-turret-press

Any advice or recommendations on choosing a press is appreciated. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-31-2017, 07:34 PM
BobG78 BobG78 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Cucamonga
Posts: 166
With a budget of $150 I would get the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme @ $126.99
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-31-2017, 07:42 PM
jmorris jmorris is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,749
You won't load a single round with either of those if all you have to spend is $150.

That said for 40 & 45 loads, and I had to pick between the two, I would get the Lee.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-2017, 08:10 PM
mangeek mangeek is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Raleigh, NC and Madison,WI
Age: 50
Posts: 661
I just started reloading myself. In fact, today was the very first time I dropped the hammer on one of my own reloads. Dang, that was scary!

Being a newbie myself, I will refrain from recommendations and leave that to the experts here. Enjoy the journey! I am so far.

And welcome to the forums!

Last edited by mangeek; 01-31-2017 at 08:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-31-2017, 08:12 PM
BobG78 BobG78 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Cucamonga
Posts: 166
I wouldn't do it, but you could buy the Lee press at $107 and Lee 3 die set at $30 with the included powder dipper and load away.
That might get you in at around $150 with shipping.

I bought my reloading setup in the '80s hate to think what it would cost now.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-31-2017, 08:30 PM
Black Jack Black Jack is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,289
I started with the RCBS Rock Chucker and then moved to the Lee Classic Turret.

The Rock Chucker is better built and will last longer, but that just means that it will still be working when your great grand-kids are reloading where the Lee will probably only last through your kids. Either one will outlast you.

The reason I would recommend beginning with the turret is because i spent so much time adjusting the dies every time I changed them, I just found it so much easier when I could just change the turret head when changing calibers. Other than that, you set things up once and are good to go, just check the first round or two each session just to be on the safe side.

The nice thing about the Lee Classic Turret itself,rather than other turrets, is that it gives you the option of manually indexing or auto indexing. In auto indexing, you are still only working on one round at a time, but do not have to manually rotate the turret head to the next station for each step in the process. In manual indexing mode, you have the option of still loading in batch mode, just like you would with a single stage, or to load each round start to finish by manually indexing for each step in the process.

However, as already mentioned, you are not going to begin reloading if you only have $150.00 to start. Either press can be purchased for less than that, the Lee Classic Turret can be had for $120.00 or less, but you still need a scale, a powder measure, dies, a loading manual and supplies. The Lee Classic Turret can be had in a kit that includes everything except dies and reloading supplies (powder, bullets, primers and brass) for $225.00 or less. You can probably find the RCBS Rock Chucker in a similar kit for $280.00 or less.

Both are good presses and will do well for you, but neither one is going to have you reloading for a total cost of $150.00 or less.

Last edited by Black Jack; 01-31-2017 at 08:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-31-2017, 09:00 PM
NonHyphenAmerican NonHyphenAmerican is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Hooterville in S.C. Kansas
Posts: 7,607
For some more money, this would be my choice.

https://www.natchezss.com/lyman-t-ma...xpert-kit.html
__________________
I hope and pray that none may kill me, Nor I kill any, with woundings grim. But if ever any should think to kill me, I pray thee, God, let me kill him first
I leave this rule for others when I'm dead, Be always sure you're right THEN GO AHEAD! Davy Crockett
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-31-2017, 09:04 PM
guidedfishing guidedfishing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 214
Get the Lee turret press, you will quickly find the single stage press tedious reloading pistol rounds. The Classic turret is one of Lee's best presses and for the money a fair value. Especially if you are only planning on loading 40 and 45.

good luck
__________________
Molan Labe Hoka Hey
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-31-2017, 09:05 PM
JohnDeereGunner JohnDeereGunner is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 27
As a relatively new reloader I'll share my experience. Initially, I wasn't sure how serious I would be and didn't want to invest a lot initially. However, I knew I wanted to reload a fair amount of volume and with multiple calibers didn't want to mess with the single stage. The lee turrett press has worked out great for me. For the price and what you get, I think it's a great way to start on a budget. It will help you learn the basics of reloading and get your feet wet while still cheaply being able to quickly change calibers without the hassle of a single state.

18 months later, I'm now looking for an upgrade to a progressive press for more throughput.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-31-2017, 09:30 PM
judgedelta judgedelta is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 697
I have 2 Rock Chuckers and a Lee Classic Turret, been loading since shortly after the start of 2008 (no coincidence). Anyone who can build a 1911 will have no problem setting up whatever press he chooses. The Classic Turret is much faster loading pistol ammo, but I haven't used it for rifle. The RCBS seems to me to be more solid. Unless you buy at garage or estate sales, you won't get in for anywhere near $150. Press, scales, dies, caliper, case cleaner, brass, primers, bullets. Probably around $500, maybe...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-31-2017, 09:40 PM
John Joseph John Joseph is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,724
Don't forget to budget for dies (carbide for straight walled cases) shell holders (these come with Lee dies, other companies charge extra,) a scale, 6" dial or digital calipers, a good powder measure, loading blocks(which you easily can make yourself if you've access to a drill press) and a kinetic bullet puller

Check Craig's List for used gear. Quality reloading tools seldom wear out and they can save you a lot of money when you're just starting.

Or find a promotional "package" that contains what you need
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-31-2017, 10:12 PM
RON in PA RON in PA is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: S.E. PA, USA
Age: 79
Posts: 500
Get the Lee turret press. You will save much time because you won't have to change your dies after they are set up in the turret disc.
__________________
I shoot, therefore I am.

NRA Benefactor Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-01-2017, 01:09 AM
frogfurr frogfurr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Preble County, Ohio
Posts: 2,499
I have used both a single stage and a turret. A turret is a little faster than a single stage but not much. However a turret is much more convenient to use. If you had both a turret stage and single stage mounted on your bench the turret would probably be your first choice to use.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-01-2017, 04:09 AM
TjB101 TjB101 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 806
Press advice.

Look on Craigslist ... you will often find someone local selling off a press and accessories for 1/2 the price of a new model. Buy a digital scale. Decent ones are $25.00 bucks. And do spend the $22.00 for the Lee Perfect Measure. It throws a decent charge. I weigh every 4th or so case on the scale to check. Spend a few extra dollars on the carbide dies.
__________________
If at first your don't succeed, Reload
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-01-2017, 04:47 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 7,832
Reloading presses....

There is a lot more equipment needed for reloading than just buying a press:

1) reloading press
2) digital or beam scale to weigh charges
3) reloading dies, preferably a 4-die carbide set
4) large and small primer tubes (.40 S&W uses a small primer, .45 uses large pistol primers
5) a good dial caliper to measure cartridge overall length

In addition, things that are good to have would be:

1) primer flip tray
2) case tumbler for cleaning brass
3) case separator for removing case cleaning media
4) case gauge to drop check loaded rounds, otherwise use the barrel chamber of the gun

Once a person has the necessary equipment, then brass cases, primers, bullets, and powder needs to be purchased to start reloading. Many people that decide to reload will save all of their brass before they begin to reload, which prevents having to purchase new brass. If you purchase powder and primers on-line to have them shipped, there are Haz Mat fees for each order, so purchasing these components in bulk is best.....Haz Mat fees are usually around $28.50 per order. Some companies limit the weight of an order. For example, Powder Valley limits their orders to 48 lbs. per day per order: https://www.powdervalleyinc.com/

If a person doesn't shoot a lot of ammo, reloading will usually impact the shooter's desire to shoot more often.....

$150 may not be a realistic amount of money to get into reloading. I would set a budget to get all the necessary equipment with a good progressive press that can load pistol and rifle cases, between $750 - $1,000 dollars.....a good progressive reloading press will hold its value better than a single stage press.

A Dillon 550B currently runs $460, and comes with their automatic powder measure and priming system. It does not include dies. Once the machine is set up with dies, primers loaded in the primer tube assembly, the proper powder charge set for the powder measure, bullets and cases at the ready, you should be able to crank out 100 rounds in roughly 15 minutes once you get familiar with the reloading process. A single stage press may take well over an hour to produce 100 rounds.

Reloading is an investment, You can produce your own ammo and customize it for the power and the accuracy you desire for each gun. As long as you keep a good supply of reloading components on hand, you need not worry about purchasing factory ammo when there may be shortages at retail outlets.

If you only have a $150 budget, I would not try to start reloading unless you can get a very good deal on used equipment.....it may happen, but not as often as we like......you may want to plan where you will conduct your reloading.....it is best to find an area that has a controlled climate and low humidity. If you plan to reload in a non heated garage or outside building, it is best to store all powder and primers in your home or other place with controlled temperature and low humidity.

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 02-01-2017 at 05:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:30 PM
Joshua M. Smith Joshua M. Smith is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wabash IN
Age: 42
Posts: 1,634
I bought the Lee budget turret for pistol rounds.

I already have a Rockchucker, but found myself with 1000 empty cases that I couldn't leave unloaded. Single stage presses can load about 50 an hour. That's perfect for crafted rifle rounds, but not for bulk pistol.

The Lee budget press has a shorter ram travel than most other presses, and I appreciate that for pistol rounds.

I should mention that I use the Rockchucker for resizing/decapping. I don't subject the light turret press to that, though I'm sure it could do it.

Regards,

Josh
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:41 PM
thomas15 thomas15 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: PA
Posts: 949
Dear OP

You have asked the 64 thousand dollar question on your first post. Handloaders are, if nothing else, loyal customers to their favorite tool maker.

It is possible that you want the best you can buy, or it is also possible that you want only very good and it's possible that you want the least expensive there is. Handloading equipment is just like everything else, you get what you pay for. And in general, more money means more speed.

Not everyone who takes up this hobby shoots 1000s of rounds of ammo per month. A lot do, but not all. Not everyone is trying to save money or hedge against future ammo shortages. Some handloaders just want to make their own ammo because they like doing things for themselves. Those of us who work on our own cars own tools. Some want the lest expensive Asian wrenches available, others want Craftsmen and/or Snap-on. Just because you intend to load 100 rounds of 9mm per month doesn't automatically translate into putting an entry level Lee single stage press on your bench.

Anyway, in my opinion, others will disagree, but in my opinion it is difficult to begin this journey into handloading madness with a budget of less than $500.00 You might spend less and you could certainly spend more but if the figure of $500.00 doesn't scare you off then you can get good stuff without a lot of mental anguish and/or have more than 1 choice.
__________________
Certified NRA/IDPA/USPSA-NROI Range Officer
Certified NRA Pistol/Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:54 PM
thomas15 thomas15 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: PA
Posts: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua M. Smith View Post
I bought the Lee budget turret for pistol rounds.

I already have a Rockchucker, but found myself with 1000 empty cases that I couldn't leave unloaded. Single stage presses can load about 50 an hour. That's perfect for crafted rifle rounds, but not for bulk pistol.

The Lee budget press has a shorter ram travel than most other presses, and I appreciate that for pistol rounds.

I should mention that I use the Rockchucker for resizing/decapping. I don't subject the light turret press to that, though I'm sure it could do it.

Regards,

Josh
I was looking through an old edition of Handloaders Digest and someone way back when made a riser that you put on the ram in lieu of the shell holder. Then you put your shell holder in the slot at the top of the riser, thus raising the shell holder and reducing the amount of travel needed for pistol brass.
__________________
Certified NRA/IDPA/USPSA-NROI Range Officer
Certified NRA Pistol/Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:54 PM
Duece McGurk Duece McGurk is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 201
Just bought a Lee Classic Turret to load 45 ACP only ($125). Expect to spend that again on ancillary equip to get started. Supplies inventory another $100. Target is 100 rounds per hour, twice per week (while listening to TV/radio sports). Expect payout breakeven around 2,500 rounds (5 months).
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:56 PM
jmorris jmorris is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,749
You can reload ammunition for less than a $150 investment but if the press alone costs you more than $100, it's very unlikely.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-01-2017, 01:31 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 13,265
35 yrs ago....I was in the OP's shoes. If I had it to do over....I'd save my money and buy either a Dillon 550 or a Hornady AP.

You buy the Hornady AP kit for $420.....a set of dies and off you go.

If you can afford $150......you give up smokes....lotto....fast food.....you come up with $500. And if you can't find $500 in a couple of months....you're in the wrong hobby to begin with.
__________________
Ed Browns are the classy brunette on your arm at a cocktail party. Les Baers are the blonde nympho who goes with you to see Nugent in concert.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-01-2017, 01:57 PM
totaldla totaldla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 502
LCT all the way!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irish7Blood View Post
Hey guys, long time snooper to the forum but this is my first post.

I'm finishing up on my 1911 .45acp build project and started pricing ammo, and wow is it a pretty penny.
So I'm going to start reloading, I understand the basics and perhaps even a little more, as I have been around the process a decent amount and read a few manuals though by no means am I an expert.

Anyways, it's close to time to buy my own gear and I can't decide on a press. (Links on the bottom).
First off, I am not a competition shooter. Probably the farthest from it.
I'm mainly focused on loading .40 and .45acp (though wouldn't mind having the option of loading rifle casing as well) and don't normally go through a lot of ammo in one shooting.

With that said, I'm trying to decide on some type of single stage (probably a RCBS Special-5) or go with a turret style press (looking at the Lee Classic 4 turret).
My "budget" is around the $150 mark, cheaper is better but quality is the most important.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/73...le-stage-press

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/81...e-turret-press

Any advice or recommendations on choosing a press is appreciated. Thanks!
Definitely get the Lee Classic Turret. The RCBS boat-anchor was competitive until the LCT showed up. The LCT is simply a better all-around design.
__________________
Marlin 60 Adjustable Stock
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-01-2017, 03:43 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 5,164
RCBS RockChucker.

Carbide dies.

Hornady lock rings.
https://www.amazon.com/Hornady-Sure-...nady+die+rings
Once you have a die set up measure the length and position of all the parts.

If you are even reasonably careful you can remove dies with Hornady split rings and put them back in again without losing any adjustment.

It is a lot easier to learn on a single stage.

Once you have everything understood one of the Dillon presses will not be so intimidating.

I still have a very old RCBS straight line press (handgun only pretty much) and an RCBS 4x4.
And a RockChucker from when outside of a Star Press ($$$$) that was about it.

Last edited by brickeyee; 02-01-2017 at 03:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-01-2017, 04:46 PM
GONRA GONRA is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 405
Paranoid GONRA saved up $$$ waaaay back in 1958.
Purchased The Best (Hollywood) and actually started reloading 2 years later.
Never regretted it.
Still use same equipment today - along with TONS of other stuff.
Never had to "sell off presses to finance upgrades".
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-01-2017, 05:07 PM
nlvmike nlvmike is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 311
I got hold of an estate from a widow that included a Dillon 550 from the 80's, and a bunch of old dies and components. Most of the blue was worn off the Dillon, and what was left was more like teal in color. After some cleaning and tweaking, it worked. After a few thousand rounds, I boxed it up and mailed it to Scottsdale with a $67.00 check for handling and return postage. They sent me back a NEW press. They said it is refurbished, but I can't find a part they didn't replace. Makes a used Dillon (or a new one) look mighty attractive.

I also have next to it on the bench, a Lee Anniversary kit. I mention that because the whole kit was $150. Add dies, and it has everything you need to reload. I use it for depriming and big rifle loads, like 30-06, but I would never use it for .45ACP. Brain damage.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 PM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved