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  #26  
Old 05-21-2017, 07:57 PM
frogfurr frogfurr is offline
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I got back into reloading pistol about 4 years ago and have reloaded about 35k without a case gauge. Not saying that's the proper way of doing things but just the way I did it.
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  #27  
Old 05-21-2017, 08:57 PM
JayhawkNavy02 JayhawkNavy02 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WalterGC View Post
How many rounds a year do you reload? Case gauging thousands of rounds seems kind of OCDish to me!!
Not compulsive IMO, done with serious thought. Plus I use free labor from 3 boys who are recruited for this small, but important task. Least they can do for lodging and meals

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laudanum View Post
Lots of possibilities. More than I can think of. But, for example, the sizing die doesn't reach all the way down to the extractor groove. It's impossible. So if you have a case fired in a chamber that isn't fully supported, you may have a case bulge down where the die cannot reach ... the infamous "Glocked brass". Or, something as simple as inadequate amount of "crimp" (user error).
I have custom reamed chambers in my Bullseye 1911s, the end result is that inheriting brass from another pistol, not just a Glock usually causes issues. Many factory barrels have oversized/generous specs and/or a lack of quality control. The Dillon/Hornady/RCBS/Lee carbide dies typically do not fully size, I believe Redding's Dual Ring Carbide die(s) is one of the few exceptions to approach this, but I haven't tried them and can't verify if the propaganda is valid. End result is that I've had a enough failures to fully chamber that I now check every round before going in the box. It's also a last step quality control check to ensure primers and cases look good. Looking to pick up a set of the Redding dies for my 38 special for Distinguished Revolver and I'll make a new post on how well they do.

My current process is a Lee Bulge Buster for any brass that isn't new or doesn't have my mark. If it doesn't have my mark, the brass is deprimed and put through the Lee before going in the tumbler. I find about 5 - 10 cases per 1,000 that are a little "edgy" and "should" work, but I get paid to shoot for several months of the year and I owe a commensurate level of effort to the organization that supports my hobby.
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Last edited by JayhawkNavy02; 05-21-2017 at 10:06 PM.
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  #28  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:20 PM
DG1 DG1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WalterGC View Post
Holy Moly!! Forget that OCD; get some help with the masochism!!
I tried to imagine that many hours myself...
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  #29  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:31 PM
ambidextrous1 ambidextrous1 is offline
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I was intrigued by the mention of a "seven hole gauge from EGW", and went to their web site; I couldn't find any cartridge gauge or case gauge in their product listing. Can anyone give me more information on this? Thanks in advance.
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  #30  
Old 05-22-2017, 12:51 AM
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I believe my identity has been deduced by Brother Sherlock Laudanum Homes, so I had just as well confess to the crime Oh, you didn't know Mr. Homes middle name? Well, there you go

RustyOK, Thanks for the kind words. I very much enjoyed the visit, do come again when you have the opportunity.

RustyOK is a dedicated LEO and firearms instructor. He's a good man and an a great asset to the local community. I found him to be intelligent and friendly with a great sense of humor and quick wit. The kind of person you can like and admire at once. Excellent gun handling and marksmanship skills.

The crimp error was small, but something any of the experienced hands would have seen. No big deal, he is well on his way to becoming an excellent Reloader

It was great to meet you Rusty!!! I am grateful to the forum, that once again, it has presented me the opportunity to find another Friend.
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  #31  
Old 05-22-2017, 04:48 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is offline
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7 hole case gauge from EGW

EGW calls this a "chamber checker"... here is a link.....and it comes in various calibers.....I purchased a 7 hole in 9mm......

http://www.egwguns.com/6-and-7-hole-checkers/
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  #32  
Old 05-22-2017, 08:22 AM
Laudanum Laudanum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayhawkNavy02 View Post
Not compulsive IMO, done with serious thought. Plus I use free labor from 3 boys who are recruited for this small, but important task. Least they can do for lodging and meals



I have custom reamed chambers in my Bullseye 1911s, the end result is that inheriting brass from another pistol, not just a Glock usually causes issues. Many factory barrels have oversized/generous specs and/or a lack of quality control. The Dillon/Hornady/RCBS/Lee carbide dies typically do not fully size, I believe Redding's Dual Ring Carbide die(s) is one of the few exceptions to approach this, but I haven't tried them and can't verify if the propaganda is valid. End result is that I've had a enough failures to fully chamber that I now check every round before going in the box. It's also a last step quality control check to ensure primers and cases look good. Looking to pick up a set of the Redding dies for my 38 special for Distinguished Revolver and I'll make a new post on how well they do.

My current process is a Lee Bulge Buster for any brass that isn't new or doesn't have my mark. If it doesn't have my mark, the brass is deprimed and put through the Lee before going in the tumbler. I find about 5 - 10 cases per 1,000 that are a little "edgy" and "should" work, but I get paid to shoot for several months of the year and I owe a commensurate level of effort to the organization that supports my hobby.
The Redding dual ring sizer doesn't "fully size" either. I own one. What it does is contain two sizing rings, as the name of the die implies. The theory being that a single insert sizer necessarily undersizes (and overworks) the lower portion of the case in order to be able to size the upper portion down enough to hold the bullet with adequate case mouth tension. So, the lower insert in the Redding doesn't size the lower portion of the case as much as a standard, single ring sizer. Logic still applies ... the sizing die cannot reach past the shellholder. And, the lower sizing ring is still inset into the die a little bit for protection of the carbide. Bottom line is that it's a good die but it probably wont do anything for brass that may be bulged down low than a standard die can do. Now, of course the lower ring in the Redding may or may not be be placed a hair lower/closer to the opening of the die compared to some brands of dies. If the ring in the Redding does sit a little closer to the die entrance compared to some other brand, then it may just be enough to remove/reduce the bulge if it happens to be in that area of the brass. I find that it sizes a hair smaller up top and a hair less down low compared to a Lee.

That said, I've never had a problem with the Lee or with 45 brass in general in terms of case bulge, with my guns. So, I cant compare problematically bulged brass sized with a Lee versus the Redding to see if one works better than the other. Again, while I think it's a good die, for all intents and purposes, I think it's a solution looking for a problem. But if that problem is brass bulge, the Redding dual ring isn't the solution. Thinking about it, a steel sizer would probably work best since a carbide ring wouldn't be involved and the ring wouldn't have to be slightly inset into the die to protect it from impact. But I still don't think a steel sizer would be THE solution for bulged brass.

I think the only real solution is a bulge buster or a roll sizer.

But hey, I haven't been reloading for decades and certainly haven't had to really address the bulge issue. Accordingly, I could be way off.
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  #33  
Old 05-22-2017, 09:01 AM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is online now
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A gauge is handy, it saves you having to take down a gun to get the barrel out for plunk test. It also avoids the question "Do I plunk the barrel from Gun A, B, or C?" Applies only if you have more than one pistol of a given caliber, of course.

A proper gauge is made to maximum cartridge dimensions. That is pretty tight because a minimum chamber must accept a maximum cartridge. Of course there are tolerances in all manufactured items, what do you expect for $20 these days?

When I was shooting 9mm Miller Major (9mm brass, 160 gr bullet at Super OAL, a USPSA loophole design at the time) I had a gauge reamed with the same long throat reamer used on the barrel. No doubt about what would fit.
I also had a .45 gauge reamed with the same reamer used to touch up those "minimum match chambers" that are really undersize.

If you have a barrel with custom chamber for a given load or reamed from a short chambered "any 9" gunsmith barrel, it would be helpful to have a gauge reamed at the same time.

At present I am getting by with stock gauges, Wilson .45 and Lyman 9mm.
I have one of those 4 hole multi-caliber gauges but it is not much use, it has no chamber throats and a load with any bullet bearing surface outside the case mouth will stop short by that much. I have used it occasionally to check sizing die setup.
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  #34  
Old 05-22-2017, 02:59 PM
340six 340six is offline
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I know my Sheridan cut aways are the cat rear. By far the best made. But sad they do not have them for all Calibers
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  #35  
Old 05-22-2017, 04:30 PM
JayhawkNavy02 JayhawkNavy02 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laudanum View Post
The Redding dual ring sizer doesn't "fully size" either. I own one.
Thank you very much Laudanum, appreciate the insight and potential cost savings! I was hoping to not use the bulge buster, but that looks like it won't happen.
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  #36  
Old 05-23-2017, 05:13 AM
Laudanum Laudanum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayhawkNavy02 View Post
Thank you very much Laudanum, appreciate the insight and potential cost savings! I was hoping to not use the bulge buster, but that looks like it won't happen.
Yeah, I would say, if anything, since the Redding tends to size a hair less down on the lower section of the case, it wouldn't be a wise investment if the idea was to eliminate the use of the bulge buster. Still a good die for "routine" sizing.

Glad I could help.
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  #37  
Old 05-30-2017, 07:36 AM
mr.paul mr.paul is offline
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It can seem a bit OCDish, but I also "case gauge" every cartridge I reload. Maybe because I am a relatively low volume reloader, it isn't that painful. Every round goes through the gauge on the way to the ammo box. While doing this, I know that the case diameter is correct, length is ok, and I feel every primer to make sure it isn't too "proud". This is an inspection step that has caught funky primers on a very few occasions, and cases that may have flaked or caught and peeled back very slightly or any other irregularity. It is very rare, but I feel better that they have passed this final inspection. I have yet to have a cartridge that didn't chamber over a few thousand rounds of various calibers. My gauges are Dillon and Wilson. I do have to keep a q-tip handy though as the smallest amount of debris or foreign matter inside will give a false tight gauge. A quick swish of the gauge with the q-tip when this happens usually confirms if the was a real problem or not. My brass is most often range pick up.

I have always loaded on a Dillon 550, and do that in a moderately slow and deliberate fashion. I have had excellent results so far.
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  #38  
Old 05-30-2017, 09:03 AM
Snapdragon Snapdragon is offline
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My Dillon and RCBS carbide 45 Auto dies do not size all the way to the extractor groove, but my old steel RCBS 45 Auto die from the 1970's does. I run all my range pickups through it to eliminate any problems that might occur.

I have to run my 357 Magnum cases through one of those old dies because one of my 357 rifles has a somewhat sloppy chamber, and cases fired in it may not chamber in some of my other rifles or revolvers.

One of the things that can cause a round to fail in a gauge is a burred rim. I keep a file handy to deal with those cases. They may still plunk very nicely in a chamber even though they do not go all the way into a gauge.

Last edited by Snapdragon; 05-30-2017 at 09:22 AM.
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  #39  
Old 06-08-2017, 04:45 PM
MStarmer MStarmer is offline
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Some gauges are known to be tighter than others. In my research I found that the L.E. Wilson seemed to be the tightest, if it fits in that you should be good in anything. I only gauge my 9mm, and only because I had problems bottlenecking cases like 20yrs ago. Now I have one of the ShockBottle 100rnd gauges. I catch the occasional 9x18 or some other oddity.
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  #40  
Old 06-08-2017, 11:29 PM
pjames32 pjames32 is offline
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I use Dillon cartridge gauges. They work well but................my Springfield 3' emp 9mm won't feed cartridges that will gauge. I needed .002" more taper crimp for them to plunk in the barrel and shoot in this gun. The barrel plunk tells the true tale!
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