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  #26  
Old Yesterday, 04:00 PM
Magnumite Magnumite is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExpert View Post
Actually, the .203" pin only changes vertical engagement about .0015" compared to the .200" pin (radius vs diameter).

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Disagree in this case IF the present pin hole is sloppy enough to accept a .203” pin. The pin is pushed against the bottom of the slide stop pin hole. If the pin hole in the frame must be reamed, I agree with you. Again, how close to spec the frame is built.

In either case, that will be a $50 - $60 slide stop. And no benefit for 25% of the cost of an EXact Fit barrel assembly.
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The modern production 1911 - high visibility sights, beavertail grip safety, aluminum trigger, good trigger pull, enhanced slide/ frame fit, accurized barrel/bushing fit. If itís not a Kimber, itís a copy.

Last edited by Magnumite; Yesterday at 04:20 PM.
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  #27  
Old Yesterday, 04:31 PM
NoExpert NoExpert is offline
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Good point!

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  #28  
Old Yesterday, 04:36 PM
papafluff papafluff is online now
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Now we’re getting somewhere. My reason for posting here in the first place was to find out if I got what I paid for or just got a Lemmon? All I’ve read is that Dan Wesson is a cut above the rest when it comes to production guns but with no baseline for a comparison I’m still in the dark. Are the numbers I posted on my gun better than other production guns? Or did I pay extra money for the name? Like I stated in the beginning the quality of the machine work is really good. Surfaces are flat and parallel and void of all machine marks. Dimensions are almost identical from one side of frame to the other and the same with the slide. It’s almost like the clearance was built in. I’m going to read the suggested articles above and also do the test to check the lower lugs to slide stop pin. Ultimately I just want to know if the numbers on my gun match with what someone should expect from Dan Wesson
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  #29  
Old Yesterday, 08:15 PM
megafiddle megafiddle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papafluff View Post
...
I did contact Dan Wesson and was told that NO production 1911 locks up vertically against the slide and that my slide to frame fit are in spec.
...
I suspect Dan Wesson is being honest about their spec information. As a production carry gun, and not a target gun, the slide and frame are finished parts, made to dimensions that guarantee they will assemble without any fitting required. The old 1911 ordance specs also guaranteed this freedom from fitting, and also had generous tolerances. They were also not target guns. Also, Dan Wesson's aluminum frames are likely supplied anodized, and so cannot be fitted.

At $1800, I can understand expecting a better fit. Some examples may be better than yours, or yours may typical; possibly you will get some dimensions from other examples.

Quote:
Originally Posted by papafluff View Post
I can completely understand how a proper barrel lockup would overcome the play in the slide but thatís not the case here. The barrel on my gun is .008 away from making contact with upper lugs
You are correct, with complete freedom of the barrel to move within the slide, you would have some vertical play.

However there is another way that the barrel fit can take up vertical slide slack. If the bushing is fitted so that the bushing fit becomes tight at linkup, this will tend to force the rear of the slide upward. As the barrel links up, it carries the rear of the slide up along with it, through the bushing. This is not the correct way to do it, but it can take up vertical slack.

And often overlooked, the magazine spring, with or without rounds present, forces the rear of the slide upward, again taking up slack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by papafluff View Post
I certainly appreciate all the info and knowledge. I still question the vertical lockup. If a properly functioning 1911 locks the barrel up into the slide why would a gun like a Dan Wesson or any 1911 be produced not to? Is this something that is only found on custom built guns?? Do you buy a production 1911 and then have a barrel properly fit to get a gun to be the way it should be. I have studied the mechanics of the 1911 and itís pretty straight forward. Why is the proper vertical lockup left out?
The 1911 was designed to be assembled in large quantities from finished parts. Production guns are still produced that way, with the exception of certain features. Modern machining allows closer tolerances, and so drop in barrels with more closely fit barrel hoods can be produced for example.

A hard or close vertical lockup was not part of the original design. As a spec, the actual upper lug engagement is a derivied dimension, based on all the specs of the relavent parts. The specs guranteed that a barrel would not bind when assembled, but would also have adequate upper lug engagement and linkdown clearance.

Your Valkyrie probably resembles original 1911 specs more than the target model 1911's.

Before target model 1911's were being produced, ordance spec 1911's were being modified with welded up barrel hoods, and welded up upper lug recesses and lower lugs. They were then hard or close fitted. The frame rails might also be peened for a closer fit to the slide. Now, for custom target guns, barrel upper and lower lugs and bushing are oversize and fitted to the slide and frame. The frame rails are also oversize and fitted to the slide.

When building a target gun from a commercial 1911, an oversize barrel and bushing are often used. The goal is optimum accuracy. Carry guns are not typically modified for better accuracy. Optimum reliability is more important.

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