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  #1  
Old 07-05-2020, 10:15 PM
STEELDEPUTY6 STEELDEPUTY6 is offline
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The correct barrel for a....

I am hoping the panel will assist me by identifying the correct barrel for a 1911 Colt SN 913*. Would it be a blended HP mark on the hood , or an H spaced P be correct? All assistance appreciated in advance
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Old 07-05-2020, 10:33 PM
VetPsychWars VetPsychWars is online now
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This might help:

http://www.coolgunsite.com/pistols/barrels.htm
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  #3  
Old 07-05-2020, 11:51 PM
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #4  
Old 07-06-2020, 12:07 AM
abtex1 abtex1 is offline
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Vertical, non-serifed H on back of hood as shown in the picture above. Extremely hard to find, and if found will cost a considerable amount of money to obtain.
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  #5  
Old 07-06-2020, 05:06 AM
stan2 stan2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STEELDEPUTY6 View Post
I am hoping the panel will assist me by identifying the correct barrel for a 1911 Colt SN 913*. Would it be a blended HP mark on the hood , or an H spaced P be correct? All assistance appreciated in advance
STEELDEPUTY6,

Here's some pictures of the Barrel.

Watch out for fakes,...have Not seen one sell at auction for years.

Best Regards,

Attached Thumbnails
BARRELS 1st Gp 112-2.jpg   BARRELS 1st Gp 115-2.jpg   BARRELS 1st Gp 116-2.jpg   BARRELS 1st Gp 120-2.jpg   BARRELS 1st Gp 118.JPG  
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  #6  
Old 07-06-2020, 02:12 PM
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gbethu gbethu is offline
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Block H is correct market is about $750 today
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Last edited by gbethu; 07-06-2020 at 02:15 PM. Reason: incorrect data used
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  #7  
Old 07-06-2020, 03:25 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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For me it depend on originality and condition of the pistol. If it were really nice but just a wrong barrel, I guess I would consider going after it. If its been re-blued, a 1913 probably is not going to be worth it.
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Old 07-06-2020, 03:50 PM
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If it's been reblued then the barrel would be worth as much as the rest of the pistol!
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #9  
Old 07-06-2020, 10:15 PM
abtex1 abtex1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gbethu View Post
Block H is correct market is about $750 today

I'll buy every early H barrel you have serifed or not at $750 each. That's less than half their value out there in the wild today at 2020 prices. A guy would effectively be giving them away at 750.
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  #10  
Old 07-06-2020, 10:55 PM
VetPsychWars VetPsychWars is online now
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I wonder whether the Cylinder and Slide repro would fill the space until a real one could be found?

Tom
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  #11  
Old 07-07-2020, 12:45 AM
STEELDEPUTY6 STEELDEPUTY6 is offline
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Thanks for all the responses. i have learned so much about GI 1911s from you gentlemen. from KROIL and bronze wool to understanding the AJ Savage mystery. So, the hunt for the correct barrel begins....
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2020, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abtex1 View Post
I'll buy every early H barrel you have serifed or not at $750 each. That's less than half their value out there in the wild today at 2020 prices. A guy would effectively be giving them away at 750.
Funny, but there used to be a taboo on "correcting" pistols in the collecting world. The fact that guys are willing to pay that much for a barrel and put it in their pistol with no concern for the fact that it's still not the original one kinda speaks volumes about where this hobby is headed. I wouldn't care too much if I found out the barrel in my $1500 Remington Rand was a replacement, but had I forked over high five figures for a 1912 Colt only to find somebody had pieced it back together like Humpty Dumpty I'd be more than a little pissed.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #13  
Old 07-07-2020, 01:16 PM
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gbethu gbethu is offline
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1911 barrels

dsk. forgive me but i'm a fan of restoration to original configuration WITH OUT refinishing the original finish. It may be splitting hairs but if you install the correct barrel for one that is not original, then you have increased it's worth. If you like, you can attach a bag with the incorrect parts "as found". The new owner can reinstall the incorrect barrel with out violating any collectors code. That's why serifed H barrels cost 2K....good luck ever finding an earlier type 1 barrel for the first 400 or so pistols. I have two of them...waiting to locate their original receiver.
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  #14  
Old 07-07-2020, 08:27 PM
corpsman5 corpsman5 is offline
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I'm still looking for a barrel like that with the vertical "H" for my early 1912.
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  #15  
Old 07-07-2020, 09:53 PM
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Regarding restorations, assuming full disclosure then of course yes that's fine. Unfortunately though not all collectors who do that are as honest about it as we would like. If someone told me that a given pistol had been restored to original configuration, and the price reflected it I wouldn't mind so much. Unfortunately in order to get absolute top dollar for the gun the seller often prefers to keep his mouth shut about the history, knowing full well that a pistol that hasn't been messed with or altered in any way since leaving the factory is always going to be more desirable than one that has been restored.

The problem is being compounded by the fact that the original owners of these pistols have nearly all passed on, leaving it up to the 2nd, 3rd or 15th owner to either confirm that the pistol is entirely original or at least admit that there's really no way he can know with absolute certainty. For that reason it's more important than ever to examine guns for mismatched wear spots that indicate parts which may have been replaced at some point.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #16  
Old 07-07-2020, 11:04 PM
STEELDEPUTY6 STEELDEPUTY6 is offline
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I am not the owner of the pistol. I do the cleaning and preservation on a 2,000 + collection for a very fine man. I am a 28 year veteran law enforcement officer and life long gun guy/veteran with unit armorer experience in an infantry company that was tapped to care for it all. I liken it to guys who paint the golden gate bridge, having to start over soon after finishing. The decision to correct is not mine, only to find the proper one. I'm a kid in a candy store!
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  #17  
Old 07-07-2020, 11:59 PM
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You sound like one of the guys tasked to maintain Kermit Week's massive vintage aircraft collection. Proud to be able to do it, but probably also jealous as hell!
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #18  
Old 07-08-2020, 12:58 AM
USMM guy USMM guy is online now
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My take away from a lot of the threads that have shown up here of late.

Is that the collecting of these handguns is quickly going the way of any number of collectors of highly sought after, and limited supply artifacts as well as artworks.

A limited supply of said items increasingly sought after by a group of people with a large amount of discretionary income or just plain old disposable wealth. It happens.

Some years ago I had a chance to purchase an original painting of two barn owls by John James Audubon. I actually had the money to buy it and considered doing so. But I did not have a secure place to keep it so I refrained from doing so. Additionally I had a chance to purchase an M2 .50 BMG machine gun for 7,500$ at one time which I had to let go for the same reason. Neither one of these purchases I would consider today for the cost factor alone.

I knew a guy years ago in New Orleans that worked in a Pizza parlor and delivered pizzas in a very clean 1967 Shelby Cobra GT 500. It was his daily driver. This guy was essentially a minimum wage worker. I can not imagine what happened to that car. But I think that it is safe to say that it is not a daily driver today that gets parked out on the street next to a Pizza parlor.

Time marches on.
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  #19  
Old 07-29-2020, 08:04 AM
Ibmikey Ibmikey is offline
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This is the barrel in my well worn 1917 era1911:
Attached Thumbnails
84FA25B7-2763-4FE1-A6DA-8772915C4613.jpeg   8A1C7969-786A-4E60-A7F0-B7E782C366F4.jpeg   FA9A479B-E542-44D6-842C-301C50C77DC7.jpeg  
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  #20  
Old 07-29-2020, 03:04 PM
corpsman5 corpsman5 is offline
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Not to dispute the expertise of dsk, but wouldn't this be the correct barrel for serial #913?



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  #21  
Old 07-29-2020, 03:51 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corpsman5 View Post
Not to dispute the expertise of dsk, but wouldn't this be the correct barrel for serial #913?
The OP said 913*, which I take it to mean a four-digit serial number with the last number blotted out.
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Avoid the temptation to replace everything on your brand-new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot at least 500 rounds through it first, then decide what you don't like and want to improve. Regarding vintage 1911s, pre-1970 pistols are highly collectible in original, unaltered condition and should NEVER be refinished or modified as it completely ruins their monetary value.
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  #22  
Old 07-29-2020, 04:27 PM
corpsman5 corpsman5 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
The OP said 913*, which I take it to mean a four-digit serial number with the last number blotted out.
my fault... I didn't catch that. I guess I'm used to seeing it like 913x.
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  #23  
Old 07-30-2020, 05:14 AM
CJS57 CJS57 is offline
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I sold a serified early H barrel in very nice condition for $2500 a few years back. I was asking $4K but came down for an acquaintance.
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  #24  
Old 07-30-2020, 06:41 AM
stan2 stan2 is offline
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Take a close look at this one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/254666647298?ul_noapp=true

It is NOT a 1912/1913 Vertical "H" barrel. Most likely, it is a Very Rare 1916 COLT barrel.
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  #25  
Old 07-30-2020, 12:53 PM
filson filson is offline
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OK stan2. Please explain to me the difference 1912 vs1916 barrel and why is a 1916 Colt barrel very rare?
Thanks in advance
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