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  #26  
Old 01-26-2019, 05:54 PM
Schlitz 45 Schlitz 45 is online now
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I have a Umarex Colt licensed 1911 air pistol that's all metal (heavy) & fits most of my 1911 holsters pretty well-very realistic. I have made a few full size silhouettes out of 2" sheets of extruded polystyrene. I set them up from time to time in the house when no one's around and practice taking shots down the hallway into the living room. The foam captures the pellets without any issues as long as my aim's on-great fun on a snowy day.
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  #27  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:27 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by combat auto View Post
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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
@CA - thx for the link. I'm leaning toward picking up a cheap 1911 and replacing the slide internals with the coolfire.

What are your thoughts now that you've used the SIRT a bit?
Sendit, It is great. I am surprised how much value it adds, exceeding my expectations by a bit. It just lets you do things which can't be done with the real gun alone in dry fire like strings of fire without having to manually cock (THIS ALONE is worth the $$$ if one is serious about dry fire). Having to cock to pull the trigger again is just unrealistic.

I'm not saying it is the only way to do this (ie there are other options as you are looking at), but they really do add value.

The other thing worth the price of admission alone is the ability to see exactly where you hit the target. Without the laser, one is calling the shot and basically estimating where they hit. Just like targets don't "lie" at the range, neither does the laser during dry-fire.

I also like the fact that you don't have to go through the safety process before using, so it is more convenient. One thing I like to do is as soon as I wake up in the AM from time to time, grab the SIRT and go through a HD simulation and see how I do stone-cold!

Other item's of value, you can set the trigger with the weight you like. Right now I have it at 5#10Oz, this is way above any of my normal guns which range from 3#'s to 4#'s. The heavier trigger forces you to make sure all the fundamentals of grabbing and holding the gun during the trigger-press are perfect. So in essence, you are training to a higher lever than you will need at the range or SD using your real guns.

Like the mag change capability also, rather drop the SIRT mag on the floor than my regular mags (granted one can have an old set of regular mags too, but SIRT makes it easy).

So after a few weeks, my new routine is to Dry-Fire Mondays first with the SIRT (all the items mentioned above especially strings of fire), then my normal routine with one or two of my real guns. My normal routine, after going through all the safety steps, is slow fire with a dime on the front sight, and quick fire from a holster. 10 or more of each on various "target" sizes and distances, and strings of fire with the draw from holster segment.

And now I added a SIRT only training day on Wednesday...So I am doing all the dry-fire I use to do with my regular guns, but added two SIRT days/week.

The SIRT is a lot of fun and kicks up home dry-fire substantially.

One more thing, I think some people have a concern with the laser (and this would apply to any laser implementation) because they believe it ruin's their front sight focus. The way to deal with this is to realize it could happen, but once understood, you learn very quickly to train your eye to maintain Front sight focus (despite the laser) and you will see the laser - just like the target - slightly out of focus. And you know you nailed the shot when the green laser can only be partially observed directly behind the F-sight. Again, this is adding value to your dry fire making your front-sight focus even stronger than it was before.

C.A.
Thanks for the feedback. Also appreciate the ideas.
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  #28  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:29 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by tgt_usa View Post
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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
BOOM - experience with something I asked about!! Thanks.
You’re welcome.

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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
Your last line above is "...you can practice draw and multi-shot drills." So the 1911 recoil barrel replaces my barrel and causes the action to cycle, right?
Right, the CoolFire CO2 tank has external dimensions of the bbl of the host gun, and replaces the bbl for conversion to L.A.S.E.R. / CO2 caliber. And there’s a reduced resistance recoil spring for it as well. The host gun trigger uses the CO2 pressure to cycle the action: voila’. The optional L.A.S.E.R. screws into the CO2 tank and has set-screws to zero the L.A.S.E.R. to the sights. The L.A.S.E.R. can be made as perfectly sighted as you’re willing to patiently chase to PoI. Ah! The reason I specified dismounting the L.A.S.E.R. and specified a government model for draws is that the CO2 tank is very nearly the same length as a government bbl; the L.A.S.E.R. adds ~3/4”. With the L.A.S.E.R. on, or using a Commander slide, you’d be practicing to overdraw.

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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
Assuming yes, if I have a custom 1911 (think Ed Brown) which is 'hand tuned' would you recommend buying a cheapo 1911 for the coolfire?
Something like that - assuming that you want a dedicated frame for it. What I did was use a semi-collectible, already on hand, that had a nice enough trigger. But my best triggers are on guns from which I shoot Pb: so I may move the CoolFire to something such as an IDPA competition gun and swap bbls as needed.
Thanks!
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  #29  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:31 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by tgt_usa View Post
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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
Another follow-up Q on the gas refill piece.

I understand that different capacity tanks enable a different number of trigger pulls. I'm unclear if the coolfire needs to be disassembled between tank swap unless you buy their components to refill the tank while in the weapon?

Does a 'large capacity tank' refer to the tank inside the coolfire or the supply tank doing the refilling?

I think your cool setup to refill at home includes managing differing tank pressures(????) and if so I prefer to find a way to get a giant supply tank at the same pressure - is this possible?

I scuba so I understand Boyles law; but I know nothing about paintball and/or these co2 systems - where do I go for 'CO2 101 training'?

ETA: if I can use something like this then each 'round' is approx $0.075 right?
CoolFire does offer a longer in-gun tank: I haven’t tried it. But during the study, I did meet the inventor and have high confidence in his description of his inventions. However, I’m more concerned with maintaining all external dimensions than with reducing recharges. So I expect to stick with the bbl-sized tank in the gun.

The L.A.S.E.R. covers the fill-nozzle of the standard tank. CoolFire offers an easy-fill adapter which allows filling without dismounting the L.A.S.E.R. -That- extra, I may buy. Also considering the infra-red L.A.S.E.R. to maintain computer scoring but not see the dot: OtoH, the L.A.S.E.R. is analogous to a Pb splat on steel; “don’t look at that, follow your plan for the stage”.

Yes, when I bought gear to fill 20oz [paintball] tanks at home, that requires a regulator, valves and H.P. hose. What caught me unprepared was the safety regimen for using H.P. CO2. Still thinking that through; but moved my big tanks from office to a spot in the shop where they cannot fall over, break off the valve and transform into an entirely unguided, but very fast hard and heavy rocket. Obviously, I’ve internalized the safety issues: dont want to internalize a 10lb CO2 tank. #8- O. Don’t know about using a larger tank at 20oz-tank pressure. It’s non-conventional and cannot believe it would work. The CO2 is partially in liquid state, so you’re both pouring liquid CO2 and equalizing gas pressure. From the 90g or 20oz tanks, these are familiar operations. Not much different from charging green-gas AirSoft guns/magazines. The good folks at a brewers’ supply shop fitted me out and pointed me at training web-sites. But after understanding the safety regimen, I’d like some face-to-face training myself.

12g CO2 cartridges are a no-go. But the cost is probably about right ... thinking ... oh no, at $.075 I -think- you’d be paying too much. 90g tanks @ ~$7 and more than 100 shots. But if I can get my 10lb tank charging, there’s probably ~1,000,000rds of CO2 in my arsenal.
Interesting. Thx for the education and the tips.
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  #30  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:32 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by hardluk1 View Post
I like a green gas airsoft , not a bb version but the white plastic pellets for draw and fire training as you can get blow back version for multiple shots . You can hang blanket indoors with a paper target on it and shoot away and control the pellets by just rolling up the bottom to catch them .
"Green gas"?? School me ...
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  #31  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:36 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by tgt_usa View Post
Using a 90g can, over a few experiments, I was able to get 7 - 9 -vigorous- cycles from a single charge; but when I kept activating the trigger, it cycled 21 - 29 times. The slide was barely more than cocking the hammer after about 10 - 12 cycles. My drills are mostly 5-shot; and, just as I generally load a fresh magazine, I’ve mostly been charging @5rds. Memory was that the 90g charged about the same, only a little better than a conventional M1911 magazine. It’s actually quite a bit better. Shouldn’t have responded just from memory.

So a 90g can would be usable for more shots than a M1911 magazine ... about two mags worth ... three if you’re not very particular. And a kit includes 2 examples of a do-hickey that prevents slide lock; so you can practice reload drills; swapping out-&-in, mags that are non-functional in L.A.S.E.R.-blaster mode.
The caliber of people here is top notch; few would 'audit' themself (selves? Which is just weird to makes a singular word plural, anyway ...) so thx. I'm liking this idea the more I learn about it.
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  #32  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:48 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by Skeet6 View Post
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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
LOL.

I meant ...

I want the 1911 manual of arms, to see where a round would hit, and not have to manually rack the slide between trigger pulls. But thanks for the humor break
No humor meant. Bullseye competitors, (and Highpower rifle competitors) dry fire constantly. If you are watching your front sight as you should be (hard focus) you'll know exactly where the shot would have landed.
I'd venture to say I've got 50 "rounds" of dry fire to every 1 of live fire.

Mike B

PS: if you NEED to see results on target, Daisy 717 in the basement or garage.
Ah.

I hear ya and respect the benefit of dry-fire.

FWIW, I'm not concerned about fundamentals or focus on lasers instead of sights. If I won the lottery, I'd have a live range and sim range in my basement 😄

My issue is that location and commitments prevent me from live fire frequently enough to be safe. I was cleaning my weapon and realized that I hadn't actually fired it in months 😞

Between kids and traveling for work, I'd love to be able to sit in a hotel room and practice. Especially if I can use a laptop, mobile phone, and see results.
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  #33  
Old 01-27-2019, 01:22 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by 1970MP View Post
I've been using LaserAmmo for over a year, now. I use this with LaserLyte targets. It is a real step forward in accuracy/stability feedback. Since the 1911 is a single action, I use the LaserLyte for multiple engagement practice, moving, etc. I downloaded an android timer app, "Dry Practice Drill," that is very useful, as well. LaserLyte is cool, but IMHO nothing beats practicing with your primary carry.
Thx!
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  #34  
Old 01-27-2019, 01:24 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by Schlitz 45 View Post
I have a Umarex Colt licensed 1911 air pistol that's all metal (heavy) & fits most of my 1911 holsters pretty well-very realistic. I have made a few full size silhouettes out of 2" sheets of extruded polystyrene. I set them up from time to time in the house when no one's around and practice taking shots down the hallway into the living room. The foam captures the pellets without any issues as long as my aim's on-great fun on a snowy day.
I'm sensing a business idea here ... 😄

Can you share links to the target material?
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  #35  
Old 01-27-2019, 03:19 PM
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tgt_usa tgt_usa is offline
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Green-gas

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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
"Green gas"?? School me ...
Propane with a suspension of silicone:

- propane both cheap and believed to be very low in toxicity

- silicone serves as both a lubricant and gas seal (e.g. O-ring) treatment

Small cans are available mail-order. What I do is charge from a propane can, e.g. a Coleman camp-stove tank, several times (~5) for each charge from an actual green-gas can.

Semi-auto AirSofts are often req’d equipment for force-on-force training classes; and in others BYOG is optional. In either of those cases, I’ll bring it. My training counsellor advises students during prep for force-on-force that propane is much cheaper and that the seals needn’t be siliconed @ magazine. After adopting that advice: one of my green-gas guns has been running and killing wasps for at least 8yrs. It’s a 2nd/3rd tier model: ~$100, about like this:

https://www.amazon.com/WE-1911-Pisto.../dp/B001M5WGAY


... ah, I see the price has gone up some.
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Last edited by tgt_usa; 01-27-2019 at 08:56 PM.
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  #36  
Old 02-02-2019, 11:16 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by tgt_usa View Post
Propane with a suspension of silicone:

- propane both cheap and believed to be very low in toxicity

- silicone serves as both a lubricant and gas seal (e.g. O-ring) treatment

Small cans are available mail-order. What I do is charge from a propane can, e.g. a Coleman camp-stove tank, several times (~5) for each charge from an actual green-gas can.

Semi-auto AirSofts are often req’d equipment for force-on-force training classes; and in others BYOG is optional. In either of those cases, I’ll bring it. My training counsellor advises students during prep for force-on-force that propane is much cheaper and that the seals needn’t be siliconed @ magazine. After adopting that advice: one of my green-gas guns has been running and killing wasps for at least 8yrs. It’s a 2nd/3rd tier model: ~$100, about like this:

https://www.amazon.com/WE-1911-Pisto.../dp/B001M5WGAY


... ah, I see the price has gone up some.
@tgt_usa ... adding value since 1776

This is a good option. Anbd much cheaper than a RIA 1911 plus barrel swap.

Follow-up question:
caveat: I think the semi-auto airsoft green gas unit listed above and the real steel plus coolfire offger the same benefits except as follows:
1. real steel provides more realistic weapon manipulation: trigger press, weight, mag changes(?)
2. real steel enables all the benefits of laser training
3. airsoft is easier to travel with
4. airsoft is cheaper for a cycling action

I miss anything major?
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  #37  
Old 02-03-2019, 10:58 AM
Oldgunner_43 Oldgunner_43 is offline
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I've found that my 1911A1 airsoft pistol is quite useful for indoor practice - at 5 yards range in my apartment. One standard CO2 cartridge will give you at least 60 shots with slide blowback and a surprisingly decent trigger. Accuracy is good enough to keep all shots in a 3 inch bullseye if you're doing your part. I've got the Colt 1911- 2011 Anniversary model made by Swiss Air. I believe that the one listed at Pyramid Air is probably identical. Here's the link - https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Colt_...ull_Metal/2537.
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  #38  
Old 02-03-2019, 11:07 AM
sendit2012 sendit2012 is offline
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Originally Posted by Oldgunner_43 View Post
I've found that my 1911A1 airsoft pistol is quite useful for indoor practice - at 5 yards range in my apartment. One standard CO2 cartridge will give you at least 60 shots with slide blowback and a surprisingly decent trigger. Accuracy is good enough to keep all shots in a 3 inch bullseye if you're doing your part. I've got the Colt 1911- 2011 Anniversary model made by Swiss Air. I believe that the one listed at Pyramid Air is probably identical. Here's the link - https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Colt_...ull_Metal/2537.
Thanks!
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  #39  
Old 02-03-2019, 02:16 PM
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tgt_usa tgt_usa is offline
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Comparison:

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Originally Posted by sendit2012 View Post
@tgt_usa ... adding value since 1776

This is a good option. Anbd much cheaper than a RIA 1911 plus barrel swap.

Follow-up question:
caveat: I think the semi-auto airsoft green gas unit listed above and the real steel plus coolfire offger the same benefits except as follows:
...
1. real steel provides more realistic weapon manipulation: trigger press, weight, mag changes(?)
Realistic as in real:
The real trigger ... excepting that my practice and, last I know, your plan is a dedicated frame. My dedicated CoolFire frame trigger, so far, is not quite as nice as on a CCW / competition gun would be.

Weight of a CoolFire setup on a 1911 is very little different than setup for shooting Pd. -But- my WE is mostly metal; a little lighter than an alloy-frame firearm, but not egregiously so.

As to mag changes, I don’t do drills using the AirSoft. Didn’t reason this out or too long ago and habitual now. Reverse-engineering it might be because the AirSoft mags aren’t / weren’t sturdy-feeling. But that practice may apply to earlier models and no longer valid for current equipment ... now, thanks to your question, I’ll re-assess.
:- j

2. real steel enables all the benefits of laser training
Yes ... electronic score-keeping and timing, etc. When I tried my shot timer with shooting blanks in my AirSoft it was not loud enough to reliably catch each shot. A different timer might be more sensitive and actually shooting with AirSoft BBs seems louder.

3. airsoft is easier to travel with
IDK, seems like an extremely low-power L.A.S.E.R.-blaster ought to have no more problems in travel than a plastic BB-gun. Since I always travel with a firearm, taking along the CoolFire would be a little easier for me.

4. airsoft is cheaper for a cycling action
More accessible it seems ... though I expect CO2 would be cheaper ... haven’t really compared price since either is much less than firearm ammunition. But green-gas is readily available mail-order and stocked at big-box sporting-goods stores last I knew.

I miss anything major?
Using AirSoft with the BBs can put real holes or dents in things. The BBs retain a lot of their muzzle energy even after a ricouchet from a hard surface: so eyes are mandatory for all in the area. Needs application of all firearm safety rules ... whereas for L.A.S.E.R. I feel free to disregard rule #3:

3). ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded unless ready to use it.



What I like about CoolFire more are these:
Anything is a target either shooting “blanks” or L.A.S.E.R. The L.A.S.E.R. won’t damage [much of] anything.

Greater precision ... more even than a firearm, much more than AirSoft.

Electronic scoring and timing.



What I like about AirSoft more are these:
Less expensive equipment.

Use of kinetically reactive targets (e.g. soda cans, wasps).


For shooting blanks - no L.A.S.E.R. / no BBs - they’re pretty similar. The perceived recoil of CoolFire probably measures more but so much less than as a firearm, the difference between CO2 and green-gas seems consequential to me.

Even though AirSoft is not as accurate/precise, my AirSofts, especially the WE 1911, are surprisingly good in still air. Previously mentioned, my annual Autumn wasp hunt: Fall of ‘17, I killed ~50 wasps using ~80 shots. Shots taken were from 2m - 7m / 6 1/2 - 23ft. And wasps are both small and non-circular.

Trigger on the WE 1911 is no slouch.
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  #40  
Old 02-03-2019, 04:42 PM
Oldgunner_43 Oldgunner_43 is offline
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Shooting wasps! Now there's a great idea. I've got a fishing cabin on a lake with an ample supply of wasps and carpenter bees throughout the spring and summer. I could sit out on the deck and shoot at them with biodegradable airsoft pellets with no worries about cleaning them up. Yes, there are biodegradable pellets on the market and they cost no more than the regular ones. I currently use them for shooting tin cans and plastic bottles. Cheap fun and good practice.
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  #41  
Old 02-03-2019, 06:11 PM
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Biodegradeable

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Originally Posted by Oldgunner_43 View Post
Shooting wasps! Now there's a great idea. I've got a fishing cabin on a lake with an ample supply of wasps and carpenter bees throughout the spring and summer. I could sit out on the deck and shoot at them with biodegradable airsoft pellets with no worries about cleaning them up. Yes, there are biodegradable pellets on the market and they cost no more than the regular ones. I currently use them for shooting tin cans and plastic bottles. Cheap fun and good practice.
Who knew? Not I ... not about AirSoft. Thanks!

But the ammo for a Bug-A-Salt gun is salt. It’s pure poison on flies and mosquitoes; and out to 2m, pretty likely to disable wasps’ flight capabilities. Once they’re flighless ... no contest.
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  #42  
Old 02-07-2019, 12:57 AM
1whobuys 1whobuys is offline
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Look into a tool named MANTIS X

It and a Smart Phone and you're all set.
You can dry fire you pistol to your hearts content and it will tell you exactly what is going on before, during the trigger pull and what you are doing after the pull and it will also tell you how to correct what you are doing right and wrong.

Good Luck, don't forget to get an adaptor to go on your 1911 mag if you don't have a rail.
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  #43  
Old 02-18-2019, 06:01 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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For me -- just me -- I've kind of felt that live firing involves enough difference in senses (recoil and sound being the obvious, but also simply knowing that it's a loaded firearm) in comparison to dry firing that I try to stick with actual live range shooting.

I'm probably in the minority in this thinking, so please understand that I've very respectful of those who find dry fire practice to be helpful. You guys are 100% good to go!

But I am curious if anyone else might think similarly to me … or am I alone in focusing strictly on live fire? I have pretty easy access to a range, so I understand that that might influence my preference.
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  #44  
Old 02-18-2019, 06:22 PM
Chunker Chunker is online now
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Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
For me -- just me -- I've kind of felt that live firing involves enough difference in senses (recoil and sound being the obvious, but also simply knowing that it's a loaded firearm) in comparison to dry firing that I try to stick with actual live range shooting.

I'm probably in the minority in this thinking, so please understand that I've very respectful of those who find dry fire practice to be helpful. You guys are 100% good to go!

But I am curious if anyone else might think similarly to me … or am I alone in focusing strictly on live fire? I have pretty easy access to a range, so I understand that that might influence my preference.
Not just you, I'm with you. I tried dry fire and never got anything out of. Learned to squeeze those shots off correctly using live ammo. I had a habit of pushing shots on my big bores anticipating recoil. Practice with live rounds and concentration solved the problem. Of course being able to hit the range when I want helped...
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  #45  
Old 02-18-2019, 06:34 PM
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You are not alone

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Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
For me -- just me -- I've kind of felt that live firing involves enough difference in senses (recoil and sound being the obvious, but also simply knowing that it's a loaded firearm) in comparison to dry firing that I try to stick with actual live range shooting.

I'm probably in the minority in this thinking, so please understand that I've very respectful of those who find dry fire practice to be helpful. You guys are 100% good to go!

But I am curious if anyone else might think similarly to me … or am I alone in focusing strictly on live fire? I have pretty easy access to a range, so I understand that that might influence my preference.
Yours is a view that I’ve encountered often. When I was competing, even though in training and in theory, it was (and remains) a view I did not myself hold: it was, essentially, my practice. \ -: Until Obama’s record-shattering run as an ammunition salesman, I’d shoot 500 - 1000rds per week ... BUT ... due to the training and theory afermentioned, 95% of that was .22LR. That in order to *minimize* recoil and report. Then current, and I believe still current, modern teaching is that the psychological and physiological effects of recoil and report impede learning*. Early in the millenium, the big dogs in practical shooting sports and training for practical shooting sports, largely taught to dry-fire 10x for each round of live-fire to dillute the effect on the unconscious mind of recoil/report that works against shooting skills. Those teachers were better than I, so I adopted the teachings ... in theory. But I couldn’t be motivated to do that much dry-fire ... it wasn’t interesting enough. But I enjoy a .22LR or even a AirSoft BB shot as much as a .458 Winchester Magnum ... or ... actually ... more.
;- j

Thus my .22LR compromise. After Obama raised demand -far- faster than supply could follow AND giving up my steady part-time gig teaching pistol, 500rds was too expensive to sustain*. Groups sizes / hit percentage in rimfire and center-fire have always stayed very close to the same for me. So I regard rimfire as skill-building and center-fire as skill-testing. In theory, dry-fire should be even better skill building. My purpose for a *good* trainer is to make it interesting enough to return to shooting 1000rds per week.

*1- My own theory is that a devoted, steady diet of recoil and report will eventually inoculate one against them. As an amateur, I couldn’t devote enough time and money to test that theory. But I'd seen high-volume professionals that appeared to do so.

*2- Though, today I did burn up 420rds: 400rds of .22LR and 20rds of .45ACP.
:- )
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  #46  
Old 02-18-2019, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
For me -- just me -- I've kind of felt that live firing involves enough difference in senses (recoil and sound being the obvious, but also simply knowing that it's a loaded firearm) in comparison to dry firing that I try to stick with actual live range shooting.

I'm probably in the minority in this thinking, so please understand that I've very respectful of those who find dry fire practice to be helpful. You guys are 100% good to go!

But I am curious if anyone else might think similarly to me … or am I alone in focusing strictly on live fire? I have pretty easy access to a range, so I understand that that might influence my preference.
I respect your opinion my Friend...No training method works for everyone...I think it also depends how often one goes to the range. Obviously, dry fire is not a substitute to live rounds, have to have that recoil in the mix, especially if shooting 45, 357M, or "above". But it is the next best thing.

I go to the range every 3-4 weeks and on the weeks I don't go, I dry fire. There are many books and articles speaking to the benefit, so I will not repeat them...

Recently, as I posted above, in this now maturing thread, I've added the SIRT laser gun to my dry fire. I highly recommend it. It kicks up dry fire to the next notch, maybe two notches, because there are things you can do with the sirt which you can't simulate with an unloaded gun (like the trigger resting as if the gun was cocking, which makes a big difference in strings of fire). Same goes with the feedback you get sirt vs unloaded gun (where the laser hits as you pull the trigger tells a much more complete story than when you call the shot with traditional dry-fire)...There are also other options which include laser and co2, the latter for recoil. That is considered a firearm in NJ because they shoot pellets/bb's (if you take the laser out) so I would have to get a pistol permit first.

I also dry fire because it is just plane fun, especially now with the SIRT (dang-thing is addictive). So now on off weeks from the range I do a two days of sirt and on one of those days I also do traditional dry fire with a real gun.

I've only been to the range once since I got the sirt, and it was a total mud pit, so I was shooting at 21 yards rather than 25 yards, but my initial view is that the few weeks I had the SIRT before that range visit, my speed and accuracy (which was already very good) has gotten better...I'll have a better opinion of this over the next few range sessions.

BTW, how often do you go to the range (on average)?
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Last edited by combat auto; 02-18-2019 at 07:32 PM.
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  #47  
Old 02-18-2019, 10:11 PM
chrysanthemum chrysanthemum is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combat auto View Post
I respect your opinion my Friend...No training method works for everyone...I think it also depends how often one goes to the range. Obviously, dry fire is not a substitute to live rounds, have to have that recoil in the mix, especially if shooting 45, 357M, or "above". But it is the next best thing.

I go to the range every 3-4 weeks and on the weeks I don't go, I dry fire. There are many books and articles speaking to the benefit, so I will not repeat them...

Recently, as I posted above, in this now maturing thread, I've added the SIRT laser gun to my dry fire. I highly recommend it. It kicks up dry fire to the next notch, maybe two notches, because there are things you can do with the sirt which you can't simulate with an unloaded gun (like the trigger resting as if the gun was cocking, which makes a big difference in strings of fire). Same goes with the feedback you get sirt vs unloaded gun (where the laser hits as you pull the trigger tells a much more complete story than when you call the shot with traditional dry-fire)...There are also other options which include laser and co2, the latter for recoil. That is considered a firearm in NJ because they shoot pellets/bb's (if you take the laser out) so I would have to get a pistol permit first.

I also dry fire because it is just plane fun, especially now with the SIRT (dang-thing is addictive). So now on off weeks from the range I do a two days of sirt and on one of those days I also do traditional dry fire with a real gun.

I've only been to the range once since I got the sirt, and it was a total mud pit, so I was shooting at 21 yards rather than 25 yards, but my initial view is that the few weeks I had the SIRT before that range visit, my speed and accuracy (which was already very good) has gotten better...I'll have a better opinion of this over the next few range sessions.

BTW, how often do you go to the range (on average)?
Starting at the end, not nearly enough these days. Would prefer 4-6 times monthly. (And I'm paying for club membership). About the same situation for the golf course and travel. (Currently "strung out" between two homes/cities and helping the closest of relatives in navigating what's likely the last chapter of life ... priorities...)

And +1911 on everything my friend.
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Last edited by chrysanthemum; 02-19-2019 at 01:19 AM.
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  #48  
Old 02-18-2019, 11:54 PM
tomrkba tomrkba is offline
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  #49  
Old 02-19-2019, 06:16 AM
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combat auto combat auto is online now
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Originally Posted by chrysanthemum View Post
Starting at the end, not nearly enough these days. Would prefer 4-6 times monthly. (And I'm paying for club membership). About the same situation for the golf course and travel. (Currently "strung out" between two homes/cities and helping the closest of relatives in navigating what's likely the last chapter of life ... priorities...)

And +1911 on everything my friend.
That is great 4-6 X/month. If I could get to the range that often, I wouldn't be dry firing either (except on a rare exception i wanted to immediately try something at home).
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  #50  
Old 06-04-2019, 06:34 PM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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Nothing electronic is needed for effective dry fire training.

If you get to live fire a lot, that's great. Dry fire gets you free, convenient reps on training your eyes, draws, mag changes and other gun handling. The benefit of having the sights in front of your eyes lined up on a target as much as you can will become apparent if you objectively measure your improvement, such as via shooting matches.
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