How bright is too bright? - Page 2 - 1911Forum
1911Forum
Advertise Here
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > >

Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #26  
Old 09-26-2019, 01:11 PM
DRM813 DRM813 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 794
I have been using 600 lumen lights on my guns for several years. I like them. I just got a new M-4 that came with a new suppressor, EOtech, and a 1,000 lumen light.

I was prepared to dislike it and so far I have not. I have been on two night operations with it so far and have not had the back plash of light like I expected.

Still evaluating but so far so good.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-04-2019, 06:05 AM
ECHO154's Avatar
ECHO154 ECHO154 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: IL
Posts: 371
I carried a 1911/Surefire 300 for a number of years as a 3rd shift K-9 guy.......never had a blinding problem....rather I loved the illumination of the system as well as the ease of operation....grip pressure switch. Now a strobe effect takes getting used too.
__________________
If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence,try orderin' sombody else's dog around!

Welcome to Illinois...where weed will be legal....but you still can't get as high as our taxes
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-04-2019, 06:42 AM
Rwehavinfunyet Rwehavinfunyet is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 7,616
Small flashlights for LEO's

When I was a LEO, working as a Deputy Sheriff in Orange County FL (Orlando area), I was issued a large and heavy Maglite flashlight that was over a foot long....the only positive thing was that it could be used as a blunt object weapon..... I kept the large Maglite in my patrol vehicle, but opted for a small yet very powerful Streamlight flashlight with 1,000 lumens. It was fully rechargeable and came with a cigarette light adapter to recharge the flashlight if needed from a vehicle. This flashlight was small and light enough to carry on my duty belt, and mine fit in the holster that I could use for carrying an "asp" which I seldom carried. We also had to carry a Taser pistol, so I would rather use the Taser than strike someone with an asp. The asp was still in my patrol vehicle if needed. I believe my Streamlight was slightly over 6" in length, and had a "strobe light" option that could help to blind a criminal when shined in their face....It is a high quality flashlight that was in the $125 price range with my LE discount. I still have it, and it now sits on my nightstand by my bed in arms reach....

I think the whole concept of "too many lumens" is pure hogwash.....the good thing about a 1,000 lumen flashlight is you don't have to shine it directly on a criminal in a room of a home or office, since just shining it on a wall near a suspect will create enough light to easily define the target. I did not like a weapon mounted light, since it is too easy to give your position away on a search in a large building like a warehouse. I preferred to carry my flashlight in my weak hand using the Harris technique when searching to clear a house or warehouse. When holding a handgun in the strong hand, the weak hand and flashlight is wrapped under then placed so the gun and the backs of both hands will be touching. This does allow better recoil control when properly done. If I had to shoot a suspect at a room's length encounter or even out to 15 yards, I shoot strong hand only very well, and using the Harris flashlight technique in a room of a house or building is even better..... If I knew there was a criminal hiding in a warehouse, I would call and have plenty of back up officers and a K-9 officer with his dog, to help with a search, cover all the entry and exit points with officers, and turn on any and all available overhead lights.....and use the Harris technique if I needed to conduct a search when using a flashlight!
Attached Thumbnails
Harris Flashlight technique for handguns.jpg  

Last edited by Rwehavinfunyet; 10-04-2019 at 06:59 AM.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #29  
Old 10-04-2019, 01:11 PM
DRM813 DRM813 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 794
Rwehavinfunyet,

I used to feel like you about weapon mounted lights. Too many building searches that had cops with guns out after the search was over, pointing their guns as flashlights.

I spent a lot of time analyzing this and my thinking changed. It is as simple as this for me. The best way to get shots on target with a handgun is to have two hands on the gun. The best way to do that at night, is to have the light I am using attached to the gun where my two hands are at.

Still drives me nuts at in service training when people use their lights on their guns inappropriately, and I growl at them like the old cop I am!
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-05-2019, 08:29 PM
ECHO154's Avatar
ECHO154 ECHO154 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: IL
Posts: 371
A K-9 officer without a weapon light is at a big disadvantage as one hand is tied up with a leash leaving only a weapon hand free. I am not a big fan of weapon mounted "search lights". I always had an Olight 750 lumen on my belt too. that was for looking around or shining in vehicles. I'm a big believer that deployment from a holster, if you practice, was as fast on target as one in your hand at your side. but you could let go of the weapon to quickly free your hand. Searching a building known to have creepy crawlers....likely armed is different altogether.
__________________
If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence,try orderin' sombody else's dog around!

Welcome to Illinois...where weed will be legal....but you still can't get as high as our taxes
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-05-2019, 08:48 PM
Alabama-Ohio Alabama-Ohio is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 928
yes, there is such a thing as too bright inside. try to find a light with an adjustable spill/hot spot. flood for close work and a twist to make it a spot light for outside.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-05-2019, 11:50 PM
mark2734 mark2734 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: California
Posts: 4,873
Thanks everyone for your replies.

Again, I work mainly in extremely dense urban settings, slum/project apartments and big old houses that have been converted into tiny apartments.

The few times we're outside the ambient light makes NVG and lights much less effective. Out in the wilds a 1,000 lumen light may be able to reach out to 100 yards. In urban cities your lucky to have line of sight to 50 yards.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-06-2019, 01:22 AM
ECHO154's Avatar
ECHO154 ECHO154 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: IL
Posts: 371
Years ago I won a "search ball" at an ITOA conference. It was an LED that was weighted to always land with the beam up. It had a strobe option as well. I liked it, not as much as my partner the "fur missile" did unfortunately.......I guess it was only "virtually indestructible. Throwing it into a a room gave good illumination and the strobe was disorienting. It ran on a Cr123 battery.
__________________
If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence,try orderin' sombody else's dog around!

Welcome to Illinois...where weed will be legal....but you still can't get as high as our taxes
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-10-2020, 11:25 PM
NW GUY NW GUY is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 16
THE TROUBLE with working at a time when we had to dodge the T-rexs and raptors because they hadn't gone extinct yet, was there was NONE of that great hi lumen lighting available.

I had 3 light sources when I had to clear a building.
My 7 cell Maglite
my AA minimag that was on the belt as "backup"
Then my throw light.

You could never really get "too much" light when going through those machine shops and warehouses. And if you were on a hot body search you had to be sure you were not giving away too much.
THus
the throw light.
I had one of those super bright(supposed to be 100,000cp) rescue lights you found in the back of Popular Science that flashed. IF the room was big, and dark and maybe had someone inside waiting to say hello with his little friend.. I had the light on a 10' piece of paracord. I would turn it on and chuck it into the room. Now, imagine you are a BG waiting for the cops to come in, you have to watch the door, but the light is blinding, but you can't turn away.
We would let it pulse for a couple minutes and at the same time it was so bright you could piece search the room with an extended handle inspection mirror from outside of the doorway. . Light flashes it would light up a LOT of space.
So, after a couple minutes of watching that thing go off an elephant could go through the door and the BG wouldn't see it. A couple of times even had a B&E guy give up because his eyes were fried. WHen ready to enter, would drag the light back out and throw a coat or hat over it and make entry instead of taking the time to turn it off.

Going from old history it is hard to imagine "too much light".

But a light on my 1911 ... nope, not then, not now, not ever.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-15-2020, 04:47 AM
Buccaneer12 Buccaneer12 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 85
overlighting is a real thing. Light manufacturers are getting as bad with chasing more lumens as truck companies are at chasing "best in class". Im every bit as annoyed by the fact a 1500 series truck today is bigger than a 2500 series truck 10 years ago as i am the fact the weaponlights for handguns come in two flavors: too much light and not enough light.

I'm in a position where manufacturers frequently ask for our input and commentary on their products, and then to field test the result. Every single time a particular lighting company has asked me what i needed in a weaponlight, my answer has been the same. More spill and more brightness adjustability.

The light I need moving building to building is not the same light I need once I'm in the building, and we don't always go to NVG. The inforce lights are good because of the beam they cast is very usable in doors...it think the APL takes the cake on that, personally. Duty holsters can difficult to find for them though, and while I am a slowly dying breed, I still demand some kind of retention beyond friction on my side arm when in the field.

IMO the best light out there for a handgun would be a X300 that has an adjuster dial on the bezel that would allow you to adjust the light from 300 to 1000+ lumens, or just fit the intellibeam system to the x300.

I've just had to accept that for the most part, the gun is going to throw too much light. I generally settle on a x300 for most pistols, though, as it ends up being the least compromising of options. On smaller lights, the xc-1 and tlr7 have a good form factor, but i wish the xc-1 was brighter and i wish the tlr7 had more spill. Ive also had reliability issues from the XC1's, surprisingly.

Maybe when i retire I'll start a new weaponlight company and fix all this.

Last edited by Buccaneer12; 01-15-2020 at 04:50 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:44 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2015 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved