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  #26  
Old 08-04-2015, 06:16 AM
Sergio Natali Sergio Natali is offline
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How many 1914 were produced by Kongsberg arsenal?
I've never seen that many of them around, would it be a better collectible than a WWI 1911?
Recently I've seen a Springfield 1911 made in 1918 , if I'm not wrong Springfield made about 45K of them.
I'd like to get a nice collectible piece but I'm a bit undecided what to get, considering that a Kongsberg would cost around USD 2,400.00 while for the Springfield they ask almost twice as much.
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  #27  
Old 08-12-2015, 01:12 AM
Matyoka Matyoka is offline
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hey guys, I am pretty much new on the 1911 arena and I have been reading in my spare time tons about the 1911 and their cousin,the 1914.

Colt45acp, in total approximately 32,000 Norwegian M1914 pistols were produced, 8,223 during Nazi occupation. Of the 8,223 made for the Germans, only 920 had the waffenamt applied marking the gun as a Nazi 1911.
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  #28  
Old 08-12-2015, 01:14 AM
Matyoka Matyoka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scoville View Post
Attachment 147989

Attachment 147990

Attachment 147991

New member here, picked this up last month.
Scoville, this has to be one of the nicest Kongsberg Colts I have seen lately. There are a couple members here that have 90% condition 1914s but yours is astonishing!!!
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  #29  
Old 08-12-2015, 06:37 PM
Matyoka Matyoka is offline
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In total approximately 32,000 Norwegian M1914 pistols were produced, 8,223 during Nazi occupation. Of the 8,223 made for the Germans, only 920 had the waffenamt applied – marking the gun as a Nazi “1911.”
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  #30  
Old 11-08-2015, 08:34 PM
gildman gildman is offline
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Were the mags serial numbered to the gun? I have one with matching serial number on mag( I think last 3 digits). Was this done later? Also there is no serial number on the hammer. I ask a forum member on another forum who is a collector in Norway about this and his rely "From serial number around 21941 (pistols assembled for the Norwegian Navy - 1933) the hammer was no longer numbered." Anyone comment? I do know from a factory letter that it was issued to the Norwegian Navy. Does anyone else have a similar gun with no serial number on the hammer?

Last edited by gildman; 11-08-2015 at 09:00 PM.
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  #31  
Old 12-02-2015, 06:18 AM
gunselmanM gunselmanM is offline
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Help with Kongsberg m1914

Guys,

Need help. Have come across a Kongsberg m1914 with serial numbers 17038 on all visable parts. Needing to know how much to offer and where to stop with trying to buy it from the lady. HELP.

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  #32  
Old 12-02-2015, 10:12 AM
amd6547 amd6547 is offline
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Mine came home from Europe with my dad, who served in an armored cav unit. Complete with bringback papers hand typed in France.
When I asked him how he acquired it, all he said was "took it off a DP". His unit did go into a lot of German towns to put up the surrender proclamation, and have all the weapons turned in...they destroyed longarms by setting them on curbs and driving a Stuart tank over them.
He often regretted seeing fine, privately owned German target rifles destroyed in this way.


Last edited by amd6547; 12-02-2015 at 10:28 AM.
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  #33  
Old 04-04-2016, 11:10 PM
shawnhoag shawnhoag is offline
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Anybody have pictures of the different mags and identifying features?
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  #34  
Old 04-05-2016, 07:24 PM
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Melter942 Melter942 is offline
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All Kongsberg M1914 magazines had pinned bases with lanyard loops. Two features to look for are coarse grinding marks across the bottom of the base plate and rough sanding at the bottom of the magazine tube where the pins were flushed.

The early mags are interesting in that they were made to mimic the Colt two tone mags. The delineation between the two colors is crisp and often straight. These were used until ca. SN 3000 (approx. May, 1923)

The later mags were tinned, and appear almost galvanized overall. These were standard production through WWII.

Hanevik notes some darker magazines were produced after WWII.

I hope this helps.
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  #35  
Old 04-06-2016, 08:06 PM
fred1911 fred1911 is offline
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I just purchased a real nice Kongsberg 1914 serial number 313XX and the hammer, mag catch, barrel bushing, extractor and firing pin have no serial number but the rest of the parts do. Is this normal? Thanks for any help. Fred
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  #36  
Old 04-07-2016, 08:39 AM
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31275-31323 and 31325- 31394 were assembled from leftover parts in February 1946
31324 was assembled in July 1946

With the onset of WWII, some small parts were no longer serialized and the post war assembled pistols may have even fewer numbered parts.

Yours is most likely correct.
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  #37  
Old 04-07-2016, 09:26 AM
fred1911 fred1911 is offline
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Thanks it's a real nice example with a correct holster
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  #38  
Old 03-02-2017, 02:01 AM
Steve solberg Steve solberg is offline
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Lend lease 1911a1s to Norway

[B[/B]
Quote:
Originally Posted by visaman View Post
Talk about a "chance in the force" for a country, after issuing the Nagant revolver for many years, Norway adopted the Colt Model 1911 in 1914. But with a twist or two. In addition to the United States, many other countries around the world adopted the Model of 1911 pistol. One of the first happened to be Norway. Having adopted the 7.5mm Nagant revolver in 1883, Norway used this and the model 1893 Nagant for some 30 years until it was replaced by the .45 ACP caliber Colt Model of 1911. Indeed, the first of these pistols were purchased from Colt.

Small arms genius John Browning designed pistols for both Colt and Fabrique National (F.N.), of Belgium. It was agreed that Colt owned the patents on pistols that Browning designed for Colt, and that Fabrique National owned the patents on Browning-designed F.N. pistols. It was also agreed each company had exclusive right, license and privilege to manufacture, or have manufactured, automatic pistols containing Browning patents. Each company could exercise these rights in their own territory without interference from the other company.

Norway began testing automatic pistols in 1909, and through 1912 a Board of Officers continually reviewed all native or foreign pistols submitted to it. Prior to 1910, Colt submitted both the .38 and .45 Military Models with the .45 Military Model being most favorably received. During 1909 and 1910, this pistol was used as the standard against which all others were judged.

Late in 1911, Colt submitted what may have been a pre-production sample of the .45 Military Model of 1911 that was even better received by the Norwegian Military Board. By 1912, the pistol was approved and adopted into Norwegian Service with a nomenclature: COLT AUTOMATISK PISTOL MODEL 1912.

A New Legend?

Colt was given an order for 400 .45 ACP caliber Government Model pistols to be delivered as soon as possible. These pistols were taken from commercial production sometime in the latter part of 1913, or during the first months of 1914. Commercial serial numbering was used with the standard "C" prefix, and while serial numbers are unrecorded, they are believed to have been in the 10,000 range. It's reported this entire order was issued to the Norwegian Navy.

Norway contemplated placing larger orders for the pistol when World War I began, and may actually have purchased another 300 guns, but before negotiations could begin for additional orders, the United States had entered the war and all of Colt's production was taken by the U.S. Government. This prompted the Norwegians to manufacture their own version of the pistol. However, licensing Norway to make the Browning-designed Model of 1911 pistol required the approval of Fabrique National, because Norway was in its territory.

In January, 1915, negotiations between the Norwegian Government, Fabrique National and Colt resulted in a license agreement permitting Norway to manufacture the Colt Government Model (1911) pistol for issuance to Norwegian Military Forces. Designated as the Model 1914, the pistol was produced at Norway's Kongsberg Vapenfabrikk in Kongsberg, Norway. Some of the Government Model pistols Norway had purchased from Colt were probably used as models during production startup. What royalty arrangements were agreed upon for Norwegian production is unknown.

Norway's 1911

Production of the Norwegian Model 1914 pistol began at Kongsberg in the summer of 1917, and the first pistols were assembled and tested in December of that year. Made in .45 ACP caliber, the designation was in millimeters as 11.25mm. The original nomenclature of "COLT AUT. PISTOL M/1912," was stamped on the left side of the slide. Between July, 1917 and June, 1919, a total of 500 pistols were fabricated at the Kongsberg factory. Beginning at #1, the serial numbers ran to 500, and the year of manufacture was also included.Serial 1 is in Bady's book " Gouvernment Models", its whereabouts today is unknown, and serial number 2 was stolen from the The Norwegian Armed Troops Museum in 1978.
They really want that gun back!

These pistols were identical to the Colt Model of 1911, except for a minor detail in the hammer checkering. During the two year period required to produce the first 500 pistols, a complete mass production tooling took place. By 1919, the Kongsberg Arsenal was ready to begin high speed quantity production of the pistol.

The final production pistol exhibited certain design changes from the original 500 pistols. In this version, the slide stop is extended down and back, assuming a tail-like shape to make it easier to operate. This change required a cut-out in the left stock. Although this was the only significant change to the pistol throughout its production, the new version also had a new designation. The left side of the slide is stamped "11.25 m/m AUT. PISTOL M/1914."

The first specimens of the Norwegian M/1914 pistol numbered from 501 on. Initially finished in blue, the M/1914 pistol was equipped with hardwood grips checkered in the large diamond pattern found on the original Colt Model of 1911. How many pistols used grips made of walnut is not known, but at some point, the hardwood used was light in color, and the grips were blackened using a paint-like stain. There was no lanyard loop on the M/1914 pistol.

Manufacture of the M/1914 continued periodically through 1941. During the German occupation of Norway, manufacture of the pistol was continued, and specimens produced under German control have Waffenampt acceptance marks, and are quite rare since most did not survive the war.The fraction of pistols produced and their affirmation varied greatly from month to month. This was because the workers at Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk, most against the German occupation, rarely worked at full capacity. This was done as a silent challenge against the Germans. Often the pistols and other weapons produced were of poor quality, this also due to the protest.

Some of the most rare are the "Matpakke-Colt" (lunch box Colt) that were made out of parts smuggled out during WW2 by workers and passed down by resistance forces.
These have usually no serial markings or acceptance marks and the finish is usually not completed.

After the war, limited production continued for about a year. This run of M/1914 pistols was identical to those made during the war, but without the Waffenampt markings. By 1946 a total of some 33,000 Norwegian 1911-type pistols had been made by Kongsberg Arsenal.

At some time during its production, the M/1914 pistol was changed from a blued to a Parkerized finish, and during this time its exterior became less refined than previous pistols. Nevertheless, all major and many minor parts are stamped either with the pistol's entire serial number or the last three digits preceded by a period. All M/1914 pistols were made in the 1911 configuration with none of the improvements found in the Model 1911A1 pistol. Disassembly is identical to the Colt.

Values of unaltered Norwegian M/1914 pistols vary with age and condition, and there are at least five variations for the collector, with each of them commanding their own price. The few M/1914 pistols made after NAZI occupation are relatively unknown.

The Kongsberg Colt was phased out of use in the 80's.

What price can you really put on this kind of history? I wonder how many were "converted" by unknowing pistol-smiths over the years and now tote adjustable sights and speed safties?

I know that it exists a wery good book about the Kongsberg Colt.
Kongsberg-Colten by
Karl Egil Hanevik

Sadly, it is on norwegian only.



Before the Kongsberg Colt was phased out, some of them was checked for fatigue cracks. A lot of them had fatigue cracks in the frame, barrel lugs, top of cartridge chamber and around the cartridge chamber. They was then deemed to "be unsafe in a peace situation".
So, if you have a orginal Kongsberg Colt and is planning to fire it.. Have it checked by a competent gunsmith!

Kontrollofiserer= officer of approval and control.
The * star symbol was used on parts that had minor faults, but was still accepted.

How .45 acp is was measured in "norwegian".

Any comments ?
I had owned a 1945 dated 1911a1 Norwegian markings parkerized 11.25 on the slide. I believe made in USA for Norwegian government. Do you know who made it?
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  #39  
Old 03-17-2017, 11:34 AM
ozarkmac ozarkmac is offline
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Am I correct to understand that parts are hard to find for these? I've searched on Numrich's and another site and can't find much. Can't find any for sale listings either.

I've located two what I would call parts guns. One has been re-blued but all parts are matching including the barrel and the other has some small parts missing and its a mix-master.

I don't want to buy them and get stuck with them if I can't sell the parts. What are original barrels and any other parts going for?
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  #40  
Old 03-17-2017, 09:14 PM
stan2 stan2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarkmac View Post
Am I correct to understand that parts are hard to find for these? I've searched on Numrich's and another site and can't find much. Can't find any for sale listings either.

I've located two what I would call parts guns. One has been re-blued but all parts are matching including the barrel and the other has some small parts missing and its a mix-master.

I don't want to buy them and get stuck with them if I can't sell the parts. What are original barrels and any other parts going for?
ozarkmac,

Most likely, parts will be very hard to find. Not aware of any "loose" M/1914 parts or vendors with any (at least for the last 30 years).

Only heard one story,---an old collector that had a M/1914 with a Colt slide stop. He looked for over 15 years for a M/1914 style SS, and he eventually found one in a used parts bin at a gun show,---it was numbered to his pistol!

Best Regards,
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  #41  
Old 03-17-2017, 11:01 PM
ozarkmac ozarkmac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan2 View Post
ozarkmac,

Most likely, parts will be very hard to find. Not aware of any "loose" M/1914 parts or vendors with any (at least for the last 30 years).

Only heard one story,---an old collector that had a M/1914 with a Colt slide stop. He looked for over 15 years for a M/1914 style SS, and he eventually found one in a used parts bin at a gun show,---it was numbered to his pistol!

Best Regards,
True or not, it sounds kewl!
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  #42  
Old 04-19-2017, 12:35 PM
Knigge Knigge is offline
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Parts for the KV Colt are not that hard to find here in Norway
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  #43  
Old 04-19-2017, 04:54 PM
drail drail is offline
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Norwegians ROCK! You also have some of the most beautiful women on the planet. Seeing Norway is on my bucket list.......
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  #44  
Old 04-22-2017, 04:06 AM
Knigge Knigge is offline
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You are very welcome to visit us
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  #45  
Old 04-22-2017, 09:00 AM
kurusu kurusu is offline
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To OP. Thank you for a very good Historial on the Norvegian "1911".

Can't find that darned "thumbsup" icon".
What do you mean "it isnt" there"? It's kind of a "must have " thing. (hint to the mods )

Last edited by kurusu; 04-22-2017 at 09:02 AM.
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  #46  
Old 05-12-2017, 06:25 PM
O-Danger O-Danger is offline
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I'll Share:

Here is my 1919 Kongsberg. All matching except frustratingly the thumb safety. It is in well used condition and shows signs of extended carry in it's 98 years.




Although not matching, the thumb safety matches in wear pattern


small piece of grip missing



Interestingly the slide is re-stamped at some stage with 1(inverted)7548 - Any Ideas as to who or why this may have occurred? I wonder if this was brought back to the factory and this is an updated serial number perhaps?
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  #47  
Old 11-04-2017, 01:28 PM
indianrunfarm indianrunfarm is offline
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Kronsberg 1914

Hello,
I have just picked up my Kronsberg in the last couple of months. Id like to find out as much as I possible can about it. Any and all info would be much appreciated. Its serial #31176 dated 1945. All parts match. Finish was totally gone so I made the decision to have it restored as Blue book of guns said most had and it was in terrible shape. I would like to post pics if I can get that function to work. Thanks
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  #48  
Old 11-04-2017, 05:17 PM
GONRA GONRA is offline
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GONRA's is 1945 with Nazi stamp. Looked Brand New Unfired to me. ???
Purchased directly from importer INTERARMCO waaaay back....
$50 + Railway Express $$$. Shoots great!

(Verk buddy and I each got one. His serial nr. is right next to mine - maybe 1 or 2 off.)

Ahhh the Good Olde Days....

Last edited by GONRA; 11-04-2017 at 05:25 PM.
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  #49  
Old 01-06-2018, 06:10 PM
TFLeader TFLeader is offline
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Saw a Kongsberg at a GS today

Pretty cool gun Any idea what these are worth? Had the Nazi markings, could not find a s/n on mag. Was asking $4700.
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  #50  
Old 03-11-2019, 11:06 PM
Pappy1600 Pappy1600 is offline
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New here, reviving a old thread, I have had this one a couple of years now, recently lettered.



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