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  #1  
Old 10-07-2006, 04:03 PM
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guy sajer guy sajer is offline
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"Official" USGI 1911 Photo Thread

We have a wealth of great photos posted here , but they're not easily retrieved (scattered all over) . Much could be learned if we have a complete photo thread in an easy to find location .

Please feel free to post your photos & descriptions of your (GI only) 1911 / 1911A1 pistols .

I'm hoping to get good participation . I'll sticky it if we do . Thanks .

Enjoy

ps: I found this old thread , but many photos don't show anymore .
https://forums.1911forum.com/showthre...t=photo+thread
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  #2  
Old 10-08-2006, 11:54 AM
nrmcolt nrmcolt is offline
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Quote:
Please feel free to post your photos & descriptions of your (GI only) 1911 / 1911A1 pistols .
This should be gooood!
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  #3  
Old 10-08-2006, 04:18 PM
230grfmj 230grfmj is offline
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I'll play Mitch

Here is a Colt 1911 that according to the letter from Colt, shipped to the “Commanding Officer” Springfield Armory on September 22, 1917 in a shipment of 800 guns. To my knowledge it is 100% correct, and has the two tone magazine as well.









This picture shows how the finishing process changed directions (I hope someone can chime in and give a more correct explanation on that) as doing such left a noticeable difference in appearance just below the trigger guard on the front of the grip strap.




Correct H P marked barrel
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  #4  
Old 10-08-2006, 05:36 PM
gunner.45 gunner.45 is offline
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1943 USGI Colt - all correct and unaltered -


Back in the late 1980"s I picked up this Colt for $200 and I feel it was one
of my better investments.
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  #5  
Old 10-09-2006, 02:11 PM
jacobtowne jacobtowne is offline
 
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Quote:
This picture shows how the finishing process changed directions (I hope someone can chime in and give a more correct explanation on that) as doing such left a noticeable difference in appearance just below the trigger guard on the front of the grip strap.
Mine's the same way, with two-direction brush marks. I'll post a photo in a minute. (That's no explanation, but I'm sure someone will come along and provide information. My U.S. M1917 Colt has a similar finish, BTW.) That pistol of yours is in beautiful condition.

[IMG][/IMG]

[IMG][/IMG]

Here's the rig.

[IMG][/IMG]


The Colt was shipped November, 1917, SN196xxx. The Warren holster and Mills belt and pouch are all dated 1918. The lanyard has the 1917 patent stamp.

JT

Last edited by jacobtowne; 10-09-2006 at 02:23 PM.
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  #6  
Old 10-09-2006, 10:05 PM
Freddo Freddo is offline
 
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I bought this 1911A1 about a decade or so ago. The shop that it came from was a gunsmith shop. The smith there said he didn't know who did the work on it, but that "it was done right".
Now I know this is a mod'd 1911 but it started out as a USGI 1911. Complete with proof marks including G.H.D. (there appears to be another character inbetween the H and the D but it may have been a first attempt at the D character).
The gun has a NM bbl, bushing and slide, but the NM numbers don't match. The most intriquing thing about this gun is the revolver sight milled into the slide. I haven't seen another example of this. Anyone else?
Any other comments from the more knowledgeable 1911 fans out there?






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  #7  
Old 10-09-2006, 10:25 PM
Johnny Peppers Johnny Peppers is offline
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NM Numbers

Those are parts numbers, so the barrel will not have the same number as the bushing, and the slide will not match either one. On some Springfield Armory NM pistols the bushing, barrel, and slide were serial numbered to the frame, but this was in addition to the parts numbers.
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  #8  
Old 10-09-2006, 10:39 PM
Johnny Peppers Johnny Peppers is offline
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NM Numbers

The NM numbers you refer to are part numbers. The bushing will never have the same part number as the barrel, and the slide will never have the same part number of either the barrel or bushing. On the Springfield Armory NM pistols the barrel, bushing, and slide were serial numbered to the frame on some years production.
The extra letter in the G.H.D. is a bounce when the die was struck by hand.

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  #9  
Old 10-09-2006, 10:53 PM
Dr.um Dr.um is offline
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Freddo's gun and mine Colt No 940987 have the same "41" inspector mark on the right side trigger guard.



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  #10  
Old 10-10-2006, 01:28 AM
Freddo Freddo is offline
 
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Johnny Peppers, thanks for the great info. Glad to know NM parts don't match. And yes, I sort of thought that extra mark in the GHD was a bounce, but wasn't sure.
The gun is a tackdriver. I actually traded this for a Winchester Stainless Marine from a friend. We used to go shooting together frequently and I just HAD to have his Colt... kept bugging him to sell it to me until one day he said "I want a Stainless Marine", so I went to a local sporting good store, bought one, and traded him for it. I think I got a good deal.

Dr.um, I read your post of your very nice Colt, great looking gun and you got some great pics there! I'm more of a shooter than a collector (primarily due to lack of funds to become a serious collector), but there is something really nice about true vintage 1911's and 1911A1's. And even just in the USGI realm, so many, MANY variations to collect. It only takes... more money than I can spare. Sigh.
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  #11  
Old 10-10-2006, 02:42 PM
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guy sajer guy sajer is offline
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Excellent !

Looking good guys . Keep'em coming

Thanks
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2006, 03:07 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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Freddo,

It was once fairly popular to install S&W revolver sights on automatics.
That one is in what is known as the "protected position" with the sight leaf at the location of the stock fixed sight. The main advantage to the gunsmith was that he didn't have to fill the dovetail as he would to put the sight at the rear of the slide. But that was common, too. Armand Swenson did a lot that way.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2006, 08:30 PM
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Last edited by Sgt Art; 10-10-2006 at 08:41 PM.
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  #14  
Old 10-11-2006, 12:13 AM
Freddo Freddo is offline
 
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Jim,
Thanks for that great info. I had no idea who put the S&W sights on or why. Course I never bothered to ask "on the net" before, and figured, after browsing a few gun sites, THIS site was the one to ask. Besides, gave me a chance to show off my 1911.
AND to look at all the original-dress 1911s and A1s and drool... Now I want to get one of these "original" 1911A1s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson
Freddo,

It was once fairly popular to install S&W revolver sights on automatics.
That one is in what is known as the "protected position" with the sight leaf at the location of the stock fixed sight. The main advantage to the gunsmith was that he didn't have to fill the dovetail as he would to put the sight at the rear of the slide. But that was common, too. Armand Swenson did a lot that way.
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  #15  
Old 10-11-2006, 12:26 AM
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This is one of my .38 Supers


The work was done by Wes Barksdale, B'ham, AL about 20 years ago.

Last edited by Sgt Art; 10-11-2006 at 12:29 AM.
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  #16  
Old 10-14-2006, 11:44 AM
nightfire800 nightfire800 is offline
 
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Here's a RR from the Lowlands.







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  #17  
Old 10-15-2006, 06:55 PM
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guy sajer guy sajer is offline
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Quote:
I'm hoping to get good participation . I'll sticky it if we do . Thanks .
As promised . Keep'em coming .

Great stuff guys !
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  #18  
Old 10-16-2006, 06:04 PM
230grfmj 230grfmj is offline
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Here is a mint and nearly new 1911a1 made by Remington Rand under a US Government Contract in the mid 1940’s. During WW II times, there were many civilian product related companies that were under contract to the US Government to manufacture “war effort” related items.

Other companies that also made these for the Government were of course Colt, Ithaca, Union Switch & Signal, and Singer, who made only a very small quantity. An interesting fact about Remington Rands is that more than half the work force was women. They also produced the highest number of .45s at the lowest cost, and are thought by many to have been the best quality of all producers. They actually produced almost as many as the other three wartime producers.

The barrels were under contract to different companies. The barrel in this gun was manufactured by High Standard as was commonly found in Remington Rands.

The magazines were also made under contract and normally Remington Rands came equipped with magazines made by General Shaver, which was a division of Remington Rand, and were marked with a G, as it is on this one.

I know that in WW II there were many companies that were producing the badly needed items for the war effort. As a result, the US Government deemed certain industries as “essential industries” and the employees of those companies were then draft exempt from the military service. I would certainly imagine this would have applied to the male employees of Remington Rand during this time.

Remington Rand was formed by the 1927 merger of the Remington Typewriter Company, Rand Kardex Company, and Powers Accounting Machine Company. They were not only a known manufacturer of typewriters, but in the late 1930’s they developed the world first “dry electric shaver”.

As an interesting side note, in the 1950’s the now retired Army General Douglas MacArthur served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Remington Rand.

Remington Rand was a very aggressive company and at one time they were producing 50,000 pistols monthly. They also made strong efforts to improve manufacturing processes. As a result on some of their efforts to be better and faster, they developed the Austempering heat treating process that was perfected in the fall of 1944. I understand that process is still a standard today for many gun parts.




















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  #19  
Old 10-25-2006, 05:11 PM
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guy sajer guy sajer is offline
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Very nice guys

Unfortunately , I sold most of mine about 10 yrs ago . I did keep this 1942 Colt . Nothing fancy . Just some honest wear .

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  #20  
Old 10-27-2006, 10:53 AM
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guy sajer guy sajer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddo
Nice guys, very nice...

There's something about the 1911 that I find "more appealing" than the 1911A1... I dunno why... maybe it's because they were "the original" 1911. Anyone else find the 1911 more attractive than the A1, or am I nuts?

On another note... can you believe some of these pistols are approaching NINETY years old !!!!!! And can still shoot as good as the day they rolled off the factory floor. Amazing.
92 yrs here

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  #21  
Old 11-13-2006, 12:29 AM
CSG CSG is offline
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Here's my 1944 Remington

I traded a friend my Bushmaster V-Match AR-15 for it. His idea. It is totally original and most of the wear came from the holster it came with.
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  #22  
Old 11-13-2006, 04:35 PM
hitch1911 hitch1911 is offline
 
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1943 Ithaca with Slide Markings

1943 Ithaca shipped to Rock Island Arsenal 9/24/43 in a shipment of 2000 guns. I also have copies of the documents. It's almost brand new.
[IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
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  #23  
Old 11-17-2006, 10:46 PM
oldcanuck oldcanuck is offline
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Ok...I'll play...this is not one of my nicest, but it might be my rarest.... I guess old #55 is near, and dear, because we were both born in Canada.








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  #24  
Old 11-18-2006, 01:54 AM
Freddo Freddo is offline
 
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Oldcanuck, you're giving me a heart attack! A genuine North American Arms 1911.
I wonder how many are "out there"... not many left I'm sure.
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2006, 09:00 AM
oldcanuck oldcanuck is offline
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Freddo,

There are 21 known survivors, out of 105 originally built.

Bob
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